Neil M. Stevenson

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Neil M. Stevenson
NeilStevenson.jpg
Born (1930-12-26)December 26, 1930
Brooklyn, New York, U.S.
Died November 21, 2009(2009-11-21) (aged 78)
Williamsburg, Virginia, U.S.
Allegiance  United States
Service/branch United States Navy
Rank Rear admiral
Commands held Chief of Chaplains of the United States Navy

Neil MacGill Stevenson (December 26, 1930 – November 21, 2009) was a rear admiral and Chief of Chaplains of the United States Navy.

Biography[edit]

Stevenson was born in Brooklyn in 1930.[1][2] He attended the Bay Ridge United Presbyterian Church (now the Bay Ridge United Church). He graduated from Fort Hamilton High School in 1948,[3] Tarkio College and Pittsburgh Theological Seminary before attending Princeton Theological Seminary. Stevenson died on November 21, 2009 in Williamsburg, Virginia.[4]

Career[edit]

Stevenson joined the United States Navy in 1957. He was later stationed at Naval Station Great Lakes, Naval Station Newport and Naval Air Station Glenview, as well as aboard the USS Saratoga (CV-60).

After serving in the Vietnam War, Stevenson was named Senior Chaplain at Naval Training Center Orlando. He later served as Fleet Chaplain of the United States Pacific Fleet Deputy Chief of Chaplains. Stevenson was Chief of Chaplains from 1983 to until his retirement in 1985.

After his retirement from the Navy, he was pastor of Williamsburg Presbyterian Church in southern Virginia for 10 years, helped launch the Stone House Presbyterian Church in Toano, Va., and was interim pastor at Yorkminster Presbyterian Church.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ United States. Bureau of Naval Personnel; Drury, C.M. (1948). The History of the Chaplain Corps, United States Navy: 1972-1981. U.S. Government Printing Office. 
  2. ^ "Stevenson, Neil M. (1930- )". U.S. Naval Institute. Retrieved 2014-04-17. 
  3. ^ Tower, Fort Hamilton High School Year Book
  4. ^ "Former Navy Chief of Chaplains Dies". United States Navy. Retrieved 2014-04-17. 
  5. ^ Washington Post,Thursday, November 26, 2009