NeoGAF

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NeoGAF
NeoGAF logo.png
Web address http://neogaf.com/forum/
Commercial? Yes
Type of site
Gaming
Registration Optional & Free
Available in English
Users 151,881
Owner Tyler Malka[1]
Created by Jim Cordeira
Launched 1999; 16 years ago (1999)
Alexa rank
positive decrease 1845 (February 2015)[2]
Current status Active

NeoGAF, formerly known as the Gaming-Age Forums, is an internet forum that discusses video games, founded as an adjunct to Gaming-Age, a video game news website. Since April 4, 2006, the site has been independently hosted and administered.

Some video game developers and publishers have said that the site has a substantial impact on the gaming industry, and many use it to get user feedback on their games.[3]

History[edit]

The Gaming-Age Forums began as an adjunct to Gaming-Age, a video game news and reviews website, running the UBB forum software and hosted on the Gaming Age servers. As Gaming-Age outgrew its hosting, IGN took over hosting of Gaming-Age's forums. After IGN ceased hosting of GAF in the summer of 2001, GAF moved to ezboards, and the administration of GAF became more estranged from Gaming Age.

As the Gaming-Age staff became gradually more divorced from the day-to-day operation of GAF, problems with the new Gamesquad hosting cropped up. As software bugs in vBulletin 2, the version GAF was using at the time, continued to worsen, the Gamesquad hosting became increasingly more impractical, until the forums' database became corrupted, forcing a move to new hosting in order to change software and salvage what was left of the forums' database. In the spring of 2004, a fundraiser was held to move GAF to new hosting. On June 6, 2004, GAF took its current form (known as "NeoGAF" to long-time posters) and moved to new hosting and new software, vBulletin 3.

As of April 4, 2006, the forums were relaunched as "NeoGAF", the former in-moniker, by its administrators. NeoGAF also features its own front page, an upfront admission that the forum's audience had drifted from that of its birthing news site, but yet mandated a single portal to represent the forum's members.

Notable members[edit]

Many notable people from the video game industry have posted on NeoGAF, including Cliff Bleszinski, Jeremiah Slaczka, Vic Ireland, Andy McNamara, Jeff Green, Gary Whitta, Shawn Elliott, Greg Kasavin, Ryan Payton, Tim Lewinson, James Stevenson and Larry Hryb.[4] Denis Dyack of Silicon Knights has also posted on the forum until he was permanently banned.[5][6]

In popular culture[edit]

In the video game Scribblenauts, if the words "neogaf" or "gaf" are written, the NeoGAF logo will appear in the game. It can be mounted by the player and used similar to a helicopter (except it will not stay aloft in the air). If it is interacted with, the logo will spawn a gamer character.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Malka, Tyler AKA "EviLore" (June 20, 2013). "NeoGAF Terms of Service". Retrieved February 16, 2015. 
  2. ^ "neogaf.com Site Overview". Alexa Internet. Retrieved February 16, 2015. 
  3. ^ Ashley, Robert (2008). "Chairman of the Boards: How Online Forums Influence Game Makers and Marketers". 1UP.com. Archived from the original on May 15, 2014. Retrieved February 16, 2015. 
  4. ^ WebCite query result
  5. ^ bleahy (August 19, 2008). "NeoGAF Bans 'Too Human' Creator, Denis Dyack". G4tv.com. Retrieved February 16, 2015. 
  6. ^ Yin-Poole, Wesley (July 23, 2008). "Peter Molyneux: 'I feel sorry for Denis Dyack'". VideoGamer.com. Retrieved February 16, 2015. 
  7. ^ RawmeatCowboy (July 13, 2009). "NeoGAF confirmed for Scribblenauts". GoNintendo. Retrieved February 16, 2015. 

External links[edit]