Neopentylene fluorophosphate

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Neopentylene fluorophosphate
NPF Structure.svg
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
2-Fluoro-5,5-dimethyl-1,3,2λ5-dioxaphosphinan-2-one
Other names
NPF, neopentylene phosphoryl fluoridate
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
  • InChI=1S/C5H10FO3P/c1-5(2)3-8-10(6,7)9-4-5/h3-4H2,1-2H3
    Key: XJISJBVVETYAMI-UHFFFAOYSA-N
  • CC1(COP(=O)(OC1)F)C
Properties
C5H10FO3P
Molar mass 168.104 g·mol−1
Melting point 41–42[1] °C (106–108 °F; 314–315 K)
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

Neopentylene fluorophosphate, also known as NPF, is an organophosphate compound that is classified as a nerve agent.[2][3] It has a comparatively low potency, but is stable and persistent, with a delayed onset of action and long duration of effects.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Edmundson R. Dictionary of Organophosphorus Compounds. pp 435-436. ISBN 9780412257902
  2. ^ Hart GJ, O'Brien RD, Milbrath DS, Verkade JG (1976). "Dissociation and phosphorylation constants for the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase by 2-fluoro, 2-oxo-1,3,2-dioxaphosphorinanes". Pesticide Biochemistry and Physiology. 6 (5): 464–470. doi:10.1016/0048-3575(76)90057-2. ISSN 0048-3575.
  3. ^ Crippin JB (2006). Explosives and Chemical Weapons Identification. Taylor & Francis. p. 21. ISBN 978-0-8493-3338-5.
  4. ^ Ledgard J (2006). A laboratory history of chemical warfare agents (2nd ed.). ISBN 978-0-6151-3645-5.