Never Put It in Writing

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Never Put It in Writing
Directed by Andrew L. Stone
Produced by Andrew L. Stone
Virginia L. Stone
Written by Andrew L. Stone
Starring Pat Boone
Milo O'Shea
Fidelma Murphy
Reginald Beckwith
Music by Frank Cordell
Cinematography Martin Curtis
Edited by Noreen Ackland
Production
company
Seven Arts
Release date
1964
Running time
93 minutes
Country United Kingdom
Language English

Never Put It in Writing is a 1964 British comedy film directed by Andrew L. Stone and starring Pat Boone, Milo O'Shea, Fidelma Murphy and Reginald Beckwith.[1]

Plot[edit]

While in Ireland an insurance executive learns that somebody else has been promoted over his head. He writes an abusive letter to his bosses, only to discover that he is to be given another important post with the company. He desperately tries to recover the letter before it reaches his bosses.

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

The film was originally known as The Letter.[2] It was also known as Strictly Personal.[3]

Filming took place in Ireland. On the first day of shooting at Shannon Airport, a plane crashed in a camera and the director's van, injuring seven people, one of them seriously.[4] Andrew Stone and his wife were among those with minor injuries.[5] The government refused permission for any further low flying sequences, and the rest of the movie was shot in England.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://ftvdb.bfi.org.uk/sift/title/43988
  2. ^ "Drama of Nuclear Sub to Be Filmed: Anne Rogers Set for 'Zenda;' Ava Gardner Out of 'Iguana'" Scott, John L. Los Angeles Times 4 June 1963: C7.
  3. ^ "Pat Boone Hits Road to Boost New Movie" Hopper, Hedda. Chicago Tribune 20 June 1963: c6.
  4. ^ "AIRCRAFT CRASHES INTO FILM DIRECTOR'S VAN AT SHANNON: Seven injured during shooting of comedy" The Irish Times 8 July 1963: 1.
  5. ^ "DAIL QUESTION ON LOW-FLYING PLANE TO FILM DUBLIN: 'Shannon has nothing to gain'" The Irish Times 9 July 1963: 9.
  6. ^ "LOW -FLYING BAN STOPS PAT BOONE FILM" The Irish Times 5 Aug 1963: 1.

External links[edit]