New Palace (Stuttgart)

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New Palace of Stuttgart
(German: Neue Schloss)
Stuttgart Coat of Arms
Stuttgart Coat of Arms
Picture of the New Palace of Stuttgart
From the Garden
Location in Germany: Stuttgart
Location in Germany: Stuttgart
Stuttgart, Germany
Location in Germany
Etymology Second (Newer) Palace of the Kings of Württemberg
General information
Status Complete
Type Palace
Architectural style Baroque
Classification Schloss (Palace)
Location Stuttgart Schlossplatz
Address Schlossplatz 4, 70173 Stuttgart
Town or city Stuttgart
Country Germany
Coordinates 48°46′41″N 9°10′55″E / 48.77806°N 9.18194°E / 48.77806; 9.18194Coordinates: 48°46′41″N 9°10′55″E / 48.77806°N 9.18194°E / 48.77806; 9.18194
Completed 1807
Renovated 1958 to 1964
Client Baden-Württemberg Ministries of Finance and Economy[1]
Owner Baden-Württemberg
Affiliation Baden-Württemberg
Design and construction
Architect Nikolaus Friedrich Thouret, Leopold Retti, Philippe da la Guepière, Reinhard Heinrich Ferdinand Fischer[2]
Known for Residence of the Kings of Württemberg

Das Neue Schloss (English: New Castle), one of the last large city palaces to be built in Southern Germany, is the magnificent 17th Century Baroque residence of the Kings of Württemberg from 1746 to 1797 and from 1805 to 1807 (often exchanging this honor with the nearby Ludwigsburg Palace). It was commissioned by the young Duke Carl Eugen, was built and modified by Nikolaus Friedrich Thouret, Leopold Retti, Philippe da la Guepière, Reinhard Heinrich Ferdinand Fischer.[3]

commissioned by and built in the style. It was the ( (a few miles to the north). Standing on the south edge of the Schlossplatz in Stuttgart, the palace was built by numerous architects. In front of the New Palace stands the colossal Jubiläumssäule. Adjacent to the palace stands the Old Castle. Public tours of the building are only permitted by special arrangement. The Schlossplatz is adjacent to two other popular squares in Stuttgart: Karlsplatz to the south and Schillerplatz to the south west.

History[edit]

Planning[edit]

In 1737, the nine year old Charles Eugene became Duke of Württemberg. Because he was still a minor, he was sent to study in the court of the Prussian King Frederick the Great while administrators ran affairs in Württemberg. In 1744, a 16 year old Charles returned to Stuttgart but decided he wanted a more "befitting his royal dignity and extent of his royal household."[4]

Use After 1918[edit]

After Wilhelm II abdicated his throne on November 30th, 1918, the palace passed into state ownership. In 1919, the German Foreign Institute used the ground floor and some of the garden wing to house their offices and showrooms and some of the first and second floors became the headquarters for the local police.[5] In the early 1920s, nearly the entire first floor became a museum displaying the royal Kunstkammer, majolica collection, and former living places of the kings of Württemberg. When the German Foreign Institute moved out in 1928, the remaining unused portions of the palace were converted into German military and ancient antiquity museums. When the police headquarters moved out in 1926, the second floor housed the offices of the antiquities collection and historic preservation authorities.[6]

The World War II air raids on February 21st, 1944, Neue Schloss was almost completely burned to the ground by Allied bombs, leaving only the facade standing.[7] For many years, preservationists fought rebuild Neue Schloss (once, it was nearly demolished in favor of a hotel) until 1957 when finally it was agreed in the Baden-Württemberg Landtag that the castle would be rebuilt - by one vote. Since the reconstruction that began in 1958 under the careful direction of Horst Linde, the castle has been used by the State's government, starting with the Corps de logis (Now used for representation by the State Ministry) and the two wings of the castle. The only part of the castle that was not fully restored was an air raid shelter under the building that was demolished in 1958.[8] Today it is used by the State Ministries of Finance and Education and is now open to the public via regular guided tours.[9][10]

Trivia[edit]

  • Former German President Richard von Weizsäcker was born here on April 15, 1920.
  • Baden-Württemberg's Ministry of Culture, Youth and Support was based here until 2012.[11]

See also[edit]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

Note: The titles of books below have been translated into English. See below "Notes" section for their original German names.

  • Henk Bekker (2005). Adventure Guide Germany. Hunter Publishing, Inc. ISBN 978-1-58843-503-3. 
  • Fleck, Walther-Gerd; Talbot, Franz Joseph (1997). New Palace Stuttgart: 1744-1964. Freiburg: Deutsche Burgenvereinigung. ISBN 3-927558-05-2. 
  • Stephan. Old and New Castle of Stuttgart and Their Enviroments. 

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Henk Bekker (2005). Adventure Guide Germany. Hunter Publishing, Inc. p. 445. ISBN 978-1-58843-503-3. 
  2. ^ https://www.stuttgart.de/en/item/show/335705/1
  3. ^ https://www.stuttgart.de/en/item/show/335705/1
  4. ^ http://www.neues-schloss-stuttgart.de/
  5. ^ Fleck, Walther-Gerd; Talbot, Franz Joseph (1997). Neues Schloß Stuttgart: 1744-1964. Freiburg: Deutsche Burgenvereinigung. p. 103. ISBN 3-927558-05-2. 
  6. ^ Fleck, Talbot (1997). Neues Schloß Stuttgart: 1744-1964. Freiburg: Deutsche Burgenvereinigung. p. 104. ISBN 3-927558-05-2. 
  7. ^ Wiederaufbau des Neuen Schlosses in Stuttgart 1958-1964. p. 8. 
  8. ^ Stephan. Altes und Neues Schloß Stuttgart mit ihrer Umgebung. p. 43. 
  9. ^ http://mfw.baden-wuerttemberg.de/en/ministry/
  10. ^ http://www.stuttgarter-zeitung.de/inhalt.neues-schloss-kultusministerium-zieht-um.99377c2f-493b-48af-88a2-a84be7284aed.html
  11. ^ http://www.stuttgarter-zeitung.de/inhalt.neues-schloss-kultusministerium-zieht-um.99377c2f-493b-48af-88a2-a84be7284aed.html