New Hampshire Route 118

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New Hampshire Route 118 marker

New Hampshire Route 118
Map of New Hampshire Route 118
Map of Grafton County in northwestern New Hampshire with NH 118 highlighted in red
Route information
Maintained by NHDOT
Length: 37.003 mi[1] (59.551 km)
Major junctions
South end: US 4 in Canaan
North end: NH 112 in Woodstock
Location
Counties: Grafton
Highway system
NH 117 NH 119

New Hampshire Route 118 (abbreviated NH 118) is a 37.003-mile-long (59.551 km) secondary north–south highway in Grafton County, New Hampshire. NH 118 stretches from Woodstock in the White Mountains Region south to Canaan in the Upper Valley region.

The northern terminus of NH 118 is at New Hampshire Route 112 (the Lost River Road) in Woodstock. The road runs southward through the towns of Warren, Wentworth, Rumney, and Dorchester. The southern terminus of NH 118 is at U.S. Route 4 in Canaan. From Canaan to Wentworth, the highway is named Dorchester Road. The section from Warren to the Lost River is known as the Sawyer Highway.

Major intersections[edit]

The entire route is in Grafton County. [1][2]

Location[1][2] mi[1][2] km Destinations Notes
Canaan 0.000 0.000 US 4 (Church Street) – Enfield, Lebanon, Grafton, Danbury Southern terminus of NH 118
Rumney 15.035 24.196 NH 25 east – Plymouth Southern end of concurrency with NH 25
Wentworth 19.250 30.980 NH 25A west (Orford Road) – Orford Eastern terminus of NH 25A
Warren 23.095 37.168 NH 25C west (Lake Tarleton Road) – Piermont Eastern terminus of NH 25C
23.994 38.615 NH 25 west (Mount Moosilauke Highway) – Haverhill Northern end of concurrency with NH 25
Woodstock 37.003 59.551 NH 112 (Lost River Road) – Woodsville, North Woodstock, Lincoln Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Bureau of Planning & Community Assistance (February 20, 2015). "NH Public Roads". Concord, New Hampshire: New Hampshire Department of Transportation. Retrieved April 7, 2015. 
  2. ^ a b Bureau of Planning & Community Assistance (April 3, 2015). "Nodal Reference 2015, State of New Hampshire". New Hampshire Department of Transportation. Retrieved April 7, 2015. 

External links[edit]

KML is from Wikidata