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New Jersey Army National Guard

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New Jersey Army National Guard
New Jersey Army National Guard Headquarters DUI
Active1945/46−present (as Army National Guard)
Country United States
BranchArmy National Guard
Part ofNew Jersey Department of Military and Veterans Affairs
New Jersey National Guard
Commanders
Current
commander
Major General Lisa J. Hou, D.O.
Adjutant General

The New Jersey Army National Guard consists of more than 6,000 Citizen-Soldiers.[citation needed] The New Jersey Army National Guard is currently engaged in multiple worldwide and homeland missions. Units have deployed to Iraq, Guantanamo Bay, Afghanistan, Germany, Kosovo, Kuwait, Qatar, Bahrain, and Egypt. The Guard has also deployed to help with the recovery from Hurricane Irma in Texas and the U.S. Virgin Islands, Hurricane Maria in Florida and Puerto Rico, and Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans.

The New Jersey Army National Guard is governed through the New Jersey Department of Military and Veterans Affairs.

On the home front, the Guard is responsible for homeland security tasks in the State of New Jersey.[1]

The New Jersey National Guard maintains a State Partnership Program with the militaries of Albania and the Republic of Cyprus[2]

The New Jersey National Guard contributed forces to the 44th Division when it was reformed on Oct. 19, 1920 as a result of the National Defense Act of 1920's major expansion of the National Guard.[3][4] As originally conceived, the division was to consist of National Guard units from the States of Delaware, New Jersey and New York. The 57th Infantry Brigade was the New Jersey contribution. The brigade had the 113th and 114th Infantry Regiments.

The New Jersey Army National Guard maintained the 50th Armored Division in the force from 1946 to 1988, and afterwards contributed a New Jersey brigade to the 42nd Infantry Division.

Commander-in-Chief: Phil Murphy, Governor of New Jersey

The Adjutant General: Maj. Gen. Lisa J. Hou, D.O.

Deputy Adjutant General: Col. Yvonne L. Mays

Acting Deputy Commissioner for Veterans Affairs: Col. (Retired) Walter R. Nall

A soldier of the 1-114th Infantry reunites with his family at the Joint Training and Training Development Center, Fort Dix (Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst), May 18, 2015. (New Jersey National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Mark C. Olsen)

Structure[edit]

Adjutants Generals of New Jersey[edit]

  • Colonel William Bott, 1776–1793
  • Brigadier General Anthony Walton White, 1793–1803
  • Mr. John Morgan, 1803–1804
  • Brigadier General Ebenezer Elmer, 1804
  • Brigadier General Peter Hunt, 1804–1810
  • Brigadier General James J. Wilson, 1810–1812, 1814
  • Brigadier General John Beatty, 1812–1814
  • Brigadier General Charles Gordon, 1814–1816
  • Brigadier General Zechariah Rossell, 1816–1842
  • Major General Thomas McCall Cadwalader, 1842–1858
  • Major General Robert Field Stockton, 1858–1867
  • Major General William Scudder Stryker, 1867–1900
  • Brigadier General Alexander Coulter Oliphant, 1900–1902
  • Brigadier General Reginald Heber Breintnall, 1902–1909
  • Brigadier General Wilbur Fisk Sadler Jr., 1909–1916
  • Brigadier General Charles V. Barber, 1916–1917
  • Brigadier General Frederick Gilkyson, 1917–1932
  • Brigadier General William A. Higgins, 1932–1941
  • Colonel Edgar N. Bloomer, 1941–1942
  • Brigadier General James Isaiah Bowers, 1942–1947
  • Major General Clifford Ross Powell, 1947–1948
  • Major General Edward C. Rose, 1948–1954
  • Major General James F. Cantwell, 1964–1970
  • Major General William R. Sharp, 1970–1974
  • Major General Wilfred C. Menard Jr., 1974–1982
  • Major General Francis R. Gerard, 1982–1990
  • Major General Vito Morgano, 1990–1994
  • Major General Paul J. Glazar, 1994–2002
  • Major General Glenn K. Rieth, 2002–2011
  • Brigadier General Michael L. Cunniff, 2011–2018
  • Major General Jemal J. Beale, 2018–2020
  • Colonel Lisa J. Hou, 2020-2021 (Acting)
  • Major General Lisa J. Hou, 2021–Present

Awards and Decorations in Order of Precedence[edit]

  • New Jersey Distinguished Service Medal
  • New Jersey Medal of Valor
  • New Jersey Meritorious Service Medal
  • New Jersey Commendation Medal
  • New Jersey Ribbon of Honor
  • New Jersey Good Conduct Ribbon
  • New Jersey Merit Award
  • New Jersey Desert Storm Service Medal
  • New Jersey Desert Storm Ribbon
  • New Jersey State Service Award
  • New Jersey Recruiting Award
  • New Jersey Governor's Unit Award
  • New Jersey Unit Strength Award
Troops of the 250th Signal Battalion in Iraq.

Historic units[edit]

  • 102nd Cavalry Regiment
  • 112th Field Artillery Regiment
  • 113th Infantry Regiment, one of only nineteen Army National Guard units with campaign credit for the War of 1812
  • 157th Field Artillery Battalion
  • 157th Armored Field Artillery Battalion
  • 165th Armored Field Artillery Battalion
  • 199th Armored Field Artillery Battalion
  • 228th Armored Field Artillery Battalion
  • 254th Air Defense Artillery Regiment

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "102nd Armor Battalion". National Guard Militia Museum of New Jersey. 2019-08-07. Retrieved 2021-02-06.
  2. ^ "State Partnership Program". www.nj.gov. Retrieved 2024-06-13.
  3. ^ Doubler, Michael D. "Civilian in Peace, Soldier in War: The Army National Guard, 1636–2000" (University Press of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, 2003), p. 190.
  4. ^ Wilson, John B., The Army Lineage Series: "Armies, Corps, Divisions and Separate Brigades" (US Army Center of Military History Washington, D.C, 1999), rp374.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be "NJ NG Directory". The State of New Jersey. November 12, 2019.
  6. ^ a b "Organization". The State of New Jersey. November 12, 2019.
  7. ^ "254th Regiment (CA)". The State of New Jersey. November 12, 2019.
  8. ^ "254th Regiment (CA)". The State of New Jersey. November 12, 2019.
  9. ^ "JT2DC gains a new command team". Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst. November 12, 2019.
  10. ^ "RTS-M Home". The State of New Jersey. November 12, 2019.

External links[edit]