Socialist group, associated (National Assembly)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from New Left group)
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Socialists and affiliated
Groupe Socialistes et apparentés
Socialists and affiliated logo
Chamber National Assembly
Legislature(s) Since the 6th of the Third Republic
Previous name(s) Socialist group (1958–67, 1969–73, 1978–2007)
Groupe socialiste
Federation of the Democratic and Socialist Left group (1967–69)
Groupe de la Fédération de la gauche démocrate et socialiste
Socialist Party and radicals of the left group (1973–78)
Groupe du Parti socialiste et des radicaux de gauche
Socialist, Radical and Citizen group (2007)
Groupe socialiste, radical et citoyen
Socialist, Radical, Citizen and Miscellaneous Left group (2007–12)
Groupe socialiste, radical, citoyen et divers gauche
Socialist, Republican and Citizen group (2012–16)
Groupe socialiste, républicain et citoyen
Socialist, Ecologist and Republican group (2016–17)
Groupe socialiste, écologiste et républicain
New Left group (2017-2018)
Groupe Nouvelle Gauche
Member parties PS
MRC
PPM
DVG
President Valérie Rabault
Constituency Seine-et-Marne's 11th
Representation
31 / 577
Ideology Social democracy
Website http://deputes.lessocialistes.fr/

The Socialists and affiliated group (French: groupe Socialistes et apparentés) is a parliamentary group in the National Assembly including representatives of the Socialist Party (PS).

History[edit]

The first socialist parliamentary group emerged in 1893 under the Third Republic, with the socialists remaining present in the Chamber of Deputies through the end of the republic in 1940, resuming within the National Assembly during the brief period of the Fourth Republic.[1]

The first socialist group of the Fifth Republic was formed in the 1st National Assembly on 9 December 1958 with 47 deputies,[2] under the name of the socialist group (groupe socialiste),[3] and was re-formed with 66 seats on 6 December 1962 following legislative elections.[2] On 3 April 1967, the Federation of the Democratic and Socialist Left group (groupe de la Fédération de la gauche démocrate et socialiste) was formed,[4] consisting of 121 deputies. Following the poor performance of the FGDS in the 1968 legislative elections, with the group re-formed on 11 July 1968 including only 57 deputies,[2] and François Mitterrand subsequently resigned on 7 November, followed by Guy Mollet on 22 December, marking the end of the FGDS.[5] The associated FGDS group in the National Assembly, however, survived until its eventual dissolution on 3 October 1969, when the socialist group (groupe socialiste) was formed, with deputies transferring to the new group.[6]

Following the 1973 legislative elections in which the Socialist Party (PS) competed for the first time, a parliamentary group was formed with the radicals of the MRG (now known as the PRG) with the name Socialist Party and radicals of the left group (groupe du Parti socialiste et des radicaux de gauche) on 2 April,[7] with 102 deputies in total.[2] In subsequent years, the group was simply re-formed as the socialist group (groupe socialiste), starting on 3 April 1978 with 113 seats following legislative elections, on 2 July 1981 with 285 seats following legislative elections, on 1 April 1986 with 212 seats following legislative elections, on 16 July 1988 with 275 seats following legislative elections, on 2 April 1993 with 57 seats following legislative elections, on 12 June 1997 with 250 seats following legislative elections, and on 25 June 2002 with 141 seats following legislative elections. The group was reconstituted under a new name following the 2007 legislative elections; including 204 deputies,[2] with 186 members and 18 related, it took the name of the Socialist, Radical and Citizen group (groupe socialiste, radical et citoyen), abbreviated as SRC; on 11 July 2007, it was renamed again to become the Socialist, Radical, Citizen and Miscellaneous Left group (groupe socialiste, radical, citoyen et divers gauche).[8]

The name was again changed following the 2012 legislative elections; initially named the Socialist, Republican and Citizen group (groupe socialiste, républicain et citoyen) on 26 June,[9] the name was subsequently changed to the Socialist, Ecologist and Republican group (groupe socialiste, écologiste et républicain) on 24 May 2016,[10] after the departure of six "reformist" deputies from the ecologist group to join the socialist group amid the Denis Baupin affair and a split within Europe Ecology – The Greens (EELV) over support for Hollande's government left it with too few deputies to constitute a parliamentary group.[11]

In the 2017 legislative elections, the Socialists suffered a historically poor performance, securing only 30 seats in the National Assembly. Despite being few in number, divisions within the group over support for the new government persisted, with a number sympathetic to the ideas of president Emmanuel Macron.[12] The most recent president of the group, Olivier Faure, was re-elected on 22 June with 28 votes against Delphine Batho with 3 votes;[13] he subsequently announced on 27 June that the name of the socialist group would change to the "New Left group" (groupe Nouvelle Gauche).[14] At the time of its formation on 27 June, the parliamentary group included 31 deputies, including 3 associated members.[15]

The group was reduced by one member after the election of Joël Aviragnet was annulled, forcing a by-election, by the Constitutional Council on 18 December 2017.[16] After Faure was elected as First Secretary of the French Socialist Party, he was succeeded by Valérie Rabault on 11 April 2018, who secured 21 votes against 7 for Guillaume Garot following the withdrawal of Boris Vallaud that morning.[17]

List of presidents[edit]

Name Term start Term end Notes
Francis Leenhardt 9 December 1958 9 October 1962 [18][19]
Gaston Defferre 7 December 1962 22 May 1981 [20][21]
Pierre Joxe 30 June 1981 19 July 1984 [22][23]
André Billardon 24 July 1984 27 March 1986 [24][25]
Pierre Joxe 27 March 1986 14 May 1988 [25][26]
Louis Mermaz 21 June 1988 2 October 1990 [27][28]
Jean Auroux 10 October 1990 1 April 1993 [29][30]
Martin Malvy 1 April 1993 1 October 1995 [30][31]
Laurent Fabius 3 October 1995 21 April 1997 [32][33]
Jean-Marc Ayrault 5 June 1997 15 May 2012 [34][35]
Bruno Le Roux 21 June 2012 6 December 2016 [36][37]
Seybah Dagoma 6 December 2016 12 December 2016 [38][39]
Olivier Faure 13 December 2016 11 April 2018 [39][17]
Valérie Rabault 11 April 2018 present [17]

Historical membership[edit]

Year Seats Change Notes
1958 Steady [2]
1962 Increase19 [2]
1967 Increase55 [2]
1968 Decrease64 [2]
1973 Increase45 [2]
1978 Increase11 [2]
1981 Increase172 [2]
1986 Decrease73 [2]
1988 Increase63 [2]
1993 Decrease218 [2]
1997 Increase193 [2]
2002 Decrease109 [2]
2007 Increase63 [2]
2012 Increase91 [9]
2017 Decrease264 [15]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nicolas, Roussellier (2006). "Les socialistes face à la forme parlementaire : l'intrusion de la discipline partisane (1893–1940)". Parlement[s], Revue d'histoire politique. 6 (2): 30–39. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r "Législatures". Assemblée nationale. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  3. ^ "Liste alphabétique des députés de la Ire législature, 1958–1962 (groupe politique, département)". Assemblée nationale. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  4. ^ "Liste alphabétique des députés de la IIIe législature, 1967–1968 (groupe politique, département)". Assemblée nationale. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  5. ^ Bouneau, Christine (6 April 2009). Socialisme et jeunesse en France des années 1880 à la fin des années 1960 (1879-1969). Pessac, Gironde: Publications de la Maison des sciences de l'homme d'Aquitaine. p. 552.
  6. ^ "Tables générales des documents et débats parlementaires établies par le Service des Archives, 11 juillet 1968 – 1er avril 1973" (PDF). Imprimerie de l'Assemblée nationale. 1976. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  7. ^ "Liste alphabétique des députés de la Ve législature, 1973–1978 (groupe politique, département)". Assemblée nationale. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  8. ^ "Les déclarations politiques des groupes, signées de leurs membres, accompagnées de la liste de ces membres et des députés apparentés, ainsi que du nom du président du groupe, ont été remises le mardi 26 juin 2007 au Secrétariat général de la Présidence". Assemblée nationale. 26 June 2007. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  9. ^ a b "Les déclarations politiques des groupes, signées de leurs membres, accompagnées de la liste de ces membres et des députés apparentés, ainsi que du nom du président du groupe, ont été remises le mardi 26 juin 2012 au Secrétariat général de la Présidence". Assemblée nationale. 26 June 2012. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  10. ^ "Modifications apportées à la composition de l'Assemblée nationale". Assemblée nationale. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  11. ^ "Le groupe écologiste à l'Assemblée nationale disparaît". Le Monde. 19 May 2016. Retrieved 26 June 2016.
  12. ^ Lilian Alemagna (21 June 2017). "La confiance, premier test d'unité pour les députés socialistes". Libération. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  13. ^ "Olivier Faure réélu à la tête du groupe socialiste de l'Assemblée nationale". Le Monde. Agence France-Presse. 22 June 2017. Retrieved 27 June 2017.
  14. ^ "En direct : Mélenchon élu à la tête du groupe de La France insoumise à l'Assemblée". Le Monde. 27 June 2017. Retrieved 27 June 2017.
  15. ^ a b "Groupe Nouvelle Gauche". Assemblée nationale. Retrieved 28 June 2017.
  16. ^ "Décision n° 2017-5098/5159 AN du 18 décembre 2017". Conseil constitutionnel. 18 December 2017. Retrieved 18 December 2017.
  17. ^ a b c Audrey Tonnelier; Astrid de Villaines (11 April 2018). "Valérie Rabault succède à Olivier Faure à la tête du groupe Nouvelle Gauche". Le Monde. Retrieved 11 April 2018.
  18. ^ "Francis, Emile, Daniel Leenhardt – Base de données des députés français depuis 1789". Assemblée nationale. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  19. ^ "Tables générales des documents et débats parlementaires rédigées par le Service des Archives, 9 Décembre 1958 – 4 Octobre 1962" (PDF). Assemblée nationale. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  20. ^ "M. GASTON DEFFERRE ÉLU PRÉSIDENT DU GROUPE SOCIALISTE". Le Monde. 10 December 1962. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  21. ^ "Gaston Defferre : Tables nominatives des interventions devant l'Assemblée nationale". Assemblée nationale. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  22. ^ "M. Pierre Joxe élu président du groupe socialiste". Le Monde. 2 July 1981. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  23. ^ "Pierre Joxe : Tables nominatives des interventions devant l'Assemblée nationale". Assemblée nationale. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  24. ^ "M. Billardon, " l'industriel "". Le Monde. 26 July 1984. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  25. ^ a b Thierry Bréhier; Jean-Louis Andréani (29 March 1986). "Comment soutenir le président et critiquer le gouvernement sans troubler l'opinion". Le Monde. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  26. ^ "Table des matières établies par le service des archives de l'Assemblée nationale du 26 février au 14 mai 1988" (PDF). Assemblée nationale. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  27. ^ "PS : M. Mermaz par acclamation". Le Monde. 22 June 1988. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  28. ^ "Fabiusiens et jospinistes pourraient se disputer la présidence du groupe socialiste à l'Assemblée nationale". Le Monde. 4 October 1990. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  29. ^ "La succession de M. Mermaz à l'Assemblée M. Auroux devient président du groupe socialiste". Le Monde. 11 October 1990. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  30. ^ a b "La réunion du comité directeur du PS M. Fabius reçoit le renfort des " quadras " dans son refus d'états généraux en juillet". Le Monde. 3 April 1993. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  31. ^ Cecile Chambraud; Gérard Courtois (3 October 1995). "Le gouvernement va devoir répondre aux inquiétudes des députés". Le Monde. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  32. ^ Michel Noblecourt (3 October 1995). "Laurent Fabius devrait être élu président du groupe socialiste de l'Assemblée". Le Monde. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  33. ^ "Jacques Chirac demande aux Français les moyens de poursuivre son action". Le Monde. 22 April 1997. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  34. ^ Michel Noblecourt (6 June 1997). "Jean-Marc Ayrault va présider le groupe des députés socialistes au Palais-Bourbon". Le Monde. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  35. ^ Patrick Roger (15 May 2012). "Jean-Marc Ayrault, le "réformiste décomplexé"". Le Monde. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  36. ^ "Bruno Le Roux élu président du groupe socialiste à l'Assemblée". L'Express. Agence France-Presse. 21 June 2012. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  37. ^ Anne-Charlotte Dusseaulx (6 December 2016). "Bruno Le Roux, l'ultrafidèle, de l'Assemblée à l'Intérieur". Le Journal du Dimanche. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  38. ^ "La succession de Le Roux à la tête des députés PS est ouverte". Public Sénat. 6 December 2016. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  39. ^ a b "Olivier Faure élu président du groupe PS de l'Assemblée nationale". Le Monde. Agence France-Presse. 12 December 2016. Retrieved 26 June 2017.

External links[edit]