New Politics (magazine)

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New Politics
Editor Saulo Colón, Dan La Botz, Nancy Holmstrom, Jason Schulman, Julia Wrigley
Former editors Julius Jacobson, Phyllis Jacobson
Categories Politics
Frequency Biannual
Founder Julius Jacobson, Phyllis Jacobson
Year founded 1961
First issue  1961 (1961-Fall)
Country United States
Based in New York City
Language English
Website newpol.org
ISSN 0028-6494

New Politics is an independent socialist journal founded in 1961 and still published in the United States today. While it is inclusive of articles from a variety of left-of-center positions, the publication leans strongly toward a Third camp, democratic Marxist perspective, placing it typically to the left of the liberal or social democratic views in the journal Dissent.

Julius and Phyllis Jacobson were the founders and longtime co-editors of the journal, which had a political center of gravity reflective of their youthful formative experience in the Independent Socialist League of the 1940s and 1950s. During the Cold War, New Politics espoused the idea that socialism is indissoluble from democracy and freedom and argued strongly against totalitarian communist states and models of socialism as corruptions of and departures from the socialist ideal. The journal is perhaps best known for having published the seminal article by Hal Draper, "The Two Souls of Socialism," in 1966. It was also the first English-language publication to publish articles by the dissident Polish socialists Jacek Kuroń and Karol Modzelewski.

The first series of New Politics ran from 1961 through 1976, after which it ceased publication for a decade. The journal was restarted in 1986 and has been in print ever since, publishing two issues per year.

The current co-editors are Saulo Colón, Dan La Botz, Nancy Holmstrom, Jason Schulman, and Julia Wrigley, and its editorial board members are Riad Azar, Sam Bottone, Barry Finger, Amber A'Lee Frost, Thomas Harrison, Michael Hirsch, Micah Landau, Joanne Landy, Amy Littlefield, Marvin Mandell, Scott McLemee, Stephen R. Shalom, Alan Stowers, Bhaskar Sunkara, Adaner Usmani, Lois Weiner, and Reginald Wilson.

Contributors have included Michael Albert, Bettina Aptheker, Stanley Aronowitz, Elaine Bernard, Janet Biehl, Ian Birchall, Murray Bookchin, Johanna Brenner, Stephen Eric Bronner, Paul Buhle, Eric Chester, Tony Cliff, Noam Chomsky, Bogdan Denitch, Hal Draper, Martin Duberman, Martin Glaberman, Robin Hahnel, Herbert Hill, Doug Ireland, Staughton Lynd, Sidney Lens, Nelson Lichtenstein, Michael Löwy, Manning Marable, Sean Matgamna, Paul Mattick, Kim Moody, Christopher Phelps, Adolph Reed, David Roediger, Saskia Sassen, Jane Slaughter, Immanuel Wallerstein, Stan Weir, Cornel West, B. J. Widick, Ellen Willis, and Howard Zinn.

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  • Worcester, Kent. "New Politics," in The Encyclopedia of the American Left, 2d ed., ed. Mari Jo Buhle, Paul Buhle, and Dan Georgakas (New York: Oxford University Press, 1998): 555–556.