New Providence, New Jersey

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New Providence, New Jersey
Centennial Park in Downtown New Providence
Centennial Park in Downtown New Providence
Map of New Providence in Union County. Inset: Location of Union County in New Jersey
Map of New Providence in Union County. Inset: Location of Union County in New Jersey
Census Bureau map of New Providence, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of New Providence, New Jersey
New Providence is located in Union County, New Jersey
New Providence
New Providence
Location in Union County
New Providence is located in New Jersey
New Providence
New Providence
Location in New Jersey
New Providence is located in the United States
New Providence
New Providence
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 40°41′56″N 74°24′24″W / 40.69889°N 74.406623°W / 40.69889; -74.406623Coordinates: 40°41′56″N 74°24′24″W / 40.69889°N 74.406623°W / 40.69889; -74.406623[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
CountyUnion
IncorporatedMarch 14, 1899
Government
 • TypeBorough
 • BodyBorough Council
 • MayorAllen B. Morgan (R), term ends December 31, 2022)[3][4]
 • AdministratorBernadette C. Cuccaro[5]
 • Municipal clerkWendi B. Barry[6]
Area
 • Total3.71 sq mi (9.61 km2)
 • Land3.69 sq mi (9.55 km2)
 • Water0.02 sq mi (0.05 km2)  0.57%
 • Rank307th of 565 in state
14th of 21 in county[1]
Elevation217 ft (66 m)
Population
 • Total13,650
 • Rank201st of 566 in state
16th of 21 in county[11]
 • Density3,701.19/sq mi (1,428.92/km2)
  • Rank196th of 566 in state
17th of 21 in county[11]
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
Area code(s)908 and 973[14]
FIPS code3403951810[1][15][16]
GNIS feature ID0885321[1][17]
Websitewww.newprov.org

New Providence is a borough on the northwestern edge of Union County, in the U.S. state of New Jersey. It is located on the Passaic River, which forms the county boundary with Morris County bordering Chatham Township. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 12,171,[18][19][20] reflecting an increase of 264 (+2.2%) from the 11,907 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 468 (+4.1%) from the 11,439 counted in the 1990 Census.[21]

The borough is home to much of the Murray Hill neighborhood with the remainder lying in neighboring Berkeley Heights. Service on the NJ Transit is available at the New Providence[22] and Murray Hill stations.[23] More than 9% of New Providence's land is publicly-owned and protected parkland.

History[edit]

The written history of New Providence begins in 1664 when James, Duke of York and brother to King Charles II, purchased the land that became known as the Elizabethtown Tract from the Lenape Native Americans. Its first European settlers were members of a Puritan colony established in 1720, which was the first permanent settlement of its type.[24] The settlement was originally called "Turkey" or "Turkey Town", due to the presence of wild turkeys in the area.[25][26]

The Presbyterian Church established in 1737 was a focal point for the community, and the lack of serious injuries when the church's balcony collapsed in 1759 was deemed to be an example of Divine intervention, leading residents to change the area's name to New Providence.[26][27]

According to local tradition, George Washington spent the night in a local home, which still stands to this day. Supposedly, the local stream, Salt Brook, is named for an incident when the salt supply of the colonial village was dumped into the brook to prevent passing British soldiers from taking it. Ironically, the British Army never crossed the Watchung Mountains into this region. Salt Brook winds through town, starting near the eponymous Salt Brook Elementary School.

On April 14, 1794, Springfield Township was formed, which included the present-day township, along with the towns of Summit, New Providence, and Berkeley Heights.[28] Growth continued in the area, and on November 8, 1809, New Providence Township was formed from within Springfield Township. It included what is now Summit, New Providence, and Berkeley Heights.[28] On March 23, 1869, Summit withdrew from the New Providence Township and reincorporated as a township without any other town.[28]

On March 14, 1899, New Providence also withdrew from New Providence Township and was reincorporated as a borough.[28] With Boroughitis sweeping across the state, many communities within townships were reverting to small, locally governed communities (mostly reincorporating as boroughs) due to acts of the New Jersey Legislature that made it economically advantageous for communities so do so. New Providence Township was renamed to Berkeley Heights as of November 6, 1951.[28]

The cultivation of roses played an important role in the local economy in the 1900s.[29]

New Providence had long been a semi-dry town, under which there were no bars and no restaurants permitted to sell alcoholic beverages. Retail liquor sales were legal and restaurant-goers may bring their own alcoholic beverages. In 2011, the borough announced that it was considering issuing on-premises liquor licenses, which could bring in as much as $500,000 for each bar granted a license, with plans to use the money raised to pay for improvements to recreation areas.[30] Liquor licenses were granted in 2015 to a pair of restaurants, ending a 100-year period in which the borough had no on-premises liquor licenses.[31]

The 2011 film Win Win is set at New Providence High School, having been written by Tom McCarthy and Joe Tiboni, two former students at the school.[32]

Landmarks[edit]

Bell Laboratories, New Providence
  • Nokia Bell Labs, formerly known as Bell Telephone Laboratories, is located in the New Providence neighborhood of Murray Hill. Researchers at this facility were credited with the development of radio astronomy, the transistor, the laser, the photovoltaic cell and other advances in technology. Nine Nobel Prizes have been awarded for work completed at this facility.[33]
  • The Presbyterian Church is a large, white, historic church in the center of town.
  • The Village Shopping Center is a shopping center that takes up the majority of downtown New Providence.
  • New Providence School District currently links together the computer networks of its buildings by using a wireless LAN which includes Yagi antennas at two towers by the large copper pyramid-shaped roof.
  • Our Lady of Peace is a Roman Catholic church and school located on South Street. The parking lot at OLP becomes the home of the town's OLP fair, held for three days each spring, complete with rides, games, food, and an indoor auction/junk fest.
  • The Salt Box Museum, located at 1350 Springfield Avenue, is an 18th-century farmhouse owned by the New Providence Historical Society.[34]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, New Providence borough had a total area of 3.71 square miles (9.61 km2), including 3.69 square miles (9.55 km2) of land and 0.02 square miles (0.05 km2) of water (0.57%).[1][2]

New Providence is bordered by Berkeley Heights to the southwest and south, and by Summit to the east in Union County; and to the north by Chatham Township, across the Passaic River, in Morris County.[35][36][37]

Much of the Murray Hill neighborhood lies in New Providence, with the remainder in Berkeley Heights; Other unincorporated communities, localities and place names within the borough include Tall Oaks, Johnsons Bridge and West Summit.[38]

The borough lies on the western slope of Second Watchung Mountain. There are several creek beds carved into the landscape, most of which are forks and branches of Salt Brook. These creeks join together near the center of town then flow into the Passaic River, along the banks of which Passaic River Parkway is found. Over nine percent of New Providence's land area is permanently protected, publicly owned parkland. Most of this land is wooded floodplain adjacent to the Passaic. Union County owns much of the riverfront parkland and New Providence owns the remainder. There are several borough-owned parks that bracket Salt Brook, including Veterans Memorial Park on South Street, Lions Park on Livingston Avenue, and Clearwater Park near the end of Central Avenue.[39]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900565
191087354.5%
19201,20337.8%
19301,91859.4%
19402,37423.8%
19503,38042.4%
196010,243203.0%
197013,79634.7%
198012,426−9.9%
199011,439−7.9%
200011,9074.1%
201012,1712.2%
202013,65012.2%
Population sources: 1900–1920[40]
1900–1910[41] 1910–1930[42]
1930–1990[43] 2000[44][45] 2010[46][18][19][20] 2020[10]
</ref>

Census 2010[edit]

The 2010 United States census counted 12,171 people, 4,408 households, and 3,337 families in the borough. The population density was 3,343.4 per square mile (1,290.9/km2). There were 4,537 housing units at an average density of 1,246.3 per square mile (481.2/km2). The racial makeup was 85.98% (10,465) White, 1.27% (155) Black or African American, 0.10% (12) Native American, 9.78% (1,190) Asian, 0.04% (5) Pacific Islander, 1.22% (148) from other races, and 1.61% (196) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.43% (783) of the population.[18]

Of the 4,408 households, 39.2% had children under the age of 18; 66.2% were married couples living together; 7.2% had a female householder with no husband present and 24.3% were non-families. Of all households, 20.8% were made up of individuals and 8.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.73 and the average family size was 3.20.[18]

27.3% of the population were under the age of 18, 4.9% from 18 to 24, 24.3% from 25 to 44, 29.6% from 45 to 64, and 13.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.0 years. For every 100 females, the population had 94.8 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 91.4 males.[18]

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $113,542 (with a margin of error of +/− $12,769) and the median family income was $144,837 (+/− $13,137). Males had a median income of $103,237 (+/− $7,256) versus $60,029 (+/− $10,693) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $53,564 (+/− $3,739). About 3.2% of families and 4.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.1% of those under age 18 and 0.9% of those age 65 or over.[47]

Census 2000[edit]

A residential street

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 11,907 people, 4,404 households, and 3,307 families residing in New Providence. The population density was 3,236.9 people per square mile (1,249.3/km2). There were 4,485 housing units at an average density of 1,219.2 per square mile (470.6/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 89.77% White, 0.88% African American, 0.03% Native American, 7.60% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.68% from other races, and 1.01% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.50% of the population.[44][45]

There were 4,404 households, out of which 37.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.3% were married couples living together, 6.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.9% were non-families. 21.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.67 and the average family size was 3.13.[44][45]

In New Providence the population was spread out, with 26.3% under the age of 18, 4.0% from 18 to 24, 31.0% from 25 to 44, 23.3% from 45 to 64, and 15.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.3 males.[44][45]

The median income for a household in the borough was $90,964, and the median income for a family was $105,013. Males had a median income of $72,926 versus $46,948 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $42,995. About 1.3% of families and 1.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.0% of those under age 18 and 2.0% of those age 65 or over.[44][45]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Municipal building

New Providence is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government, which is used in 218 municipalities (of the 564) statewide, making it the most common form of government in New Jersey.[48] The governing body is comprised of the Mayor and the Borough Council, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. The Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council is comprised of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[7] The Borough form of government used by New Providence is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[49][50]

As of 2022, the Mayor of New Providence is Republican Allen B. Morgan, whose term of office ends December 31, 2022. Members of the New Providence Borough Council are Council President Nadine Geoffroy (R, 2023), Diane Bilicska (R, 2022; appointed to serve an unexpired term), Matthew E. Cumiskey (R, 2024), Peter C. DeSarno (R, 2024), Lisa McKnight (R, 2023) and Robert Muñoz (R, 2022).[3][51][52][53][54][55][56]

In January 2022, the Borough Council appointed Diane Bilicska to fill the seat expiring in December 2022 that was became vacant after Michele Matsikoudis resigned from office to take a seat in the New Jersey General Assembly.[57]

List of mayors[edit]

Mayor Term Begins Term Ends Notes
Allen B. Morgan[58] 1999 2006 Republican, Morgan had previously served as mayor for two terms between 1999 and 2006 before reutnring to the post following the crisis around Mayor Hern in 2012.
John Thoms[59] 2007 2010 Republican, Served as mayor for one term. Was denied the town's GOP endorsement during re-election which instead went to Morgan. Launched an unsuccessful bid for re-election as an independent.
J. Brooke Hern[60] 2011 2014 Republican, upset Morgan in the primary, had a successful career as mayor, but family issues would pressure him to not seek a second term.
Allen B. Morgan[58][61] 2015 Incumbent Republican, re-elected following Hern's decision to not seek a second term. In 2022 he won re-election to a third consecutive term against the first Democrat challenger in decades. Morgan won 3,000 votes to the Democrat’s 2,643.

Federal, state, and county representation[edit]

New Providence is located in the 7th Congressional District[62] and is part of New Jersey's 21st state legislative district.[19][63][64]

For the 117th United States Congress. New Jersey's Seventh Congressional District is represented by Tom Malinowski (D, Rocky Hill).[65] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2027)[66] and Bob Menendez (Harrison, term ends 2025).[67][68]

For the 2022–2023 session, the 21st Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Jon Bramnick (R, Westfield) and in the General Assembly by Michele Matsikoudis (R, New Providence) and Nancy Munoz (R, Summit).[69]

Union County is governed by a Board of County Commissioners, whose nine members are elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis with three seats coming up for election each year, with an appointed County Manager overseeing the day-to-day operations of the county. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Chair and Vice Chair from among its members.[70] As of 2022, Union County's County Commissioners are Chair Rebecca Williams (D, Plainfield, term as commissioner and as chair ends December 31, 2022),[71] Vice Chair Christopher Hudak (D, Linden, term as commissioner ends 2023; term as vice chair ends 2022),[72] James E. Baker Jr. (D, Rahway, 2024),[73] Angela R. Garretson (D, Hillside, 2023),[74] Sergio Granados (D, Elizabeth, 2022),[75] Bette Jane Kowalski (D, Cranford, 2022),[76] Lourdes M. Leon (D, Elizabeth, 2023),[77] Alexander Mirabella (D, Fanwood, 2024)[78] and Kimberly Palmieri-Mouded (D, Westfield, 2024).[79][80] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Joanne Rajoppi (D, Union Township, 2025),[81][82] Sheriff Peter Corvelli (D, Kenilworth, 2023)[83][84] and Surrogate Susan Dinardo (acting).[85][86] The County Manager is Edward Oatman.[87]

Politics[edit]

As of September 16, 2022, there were a total of 9,997 registered voters in New Providence, of which 3,190 (31.9% vs. 48% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 2,852 (28.5% vs. 15.98%) were registered as Republicans and 3,889 (38.9% vs. 34.78%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 66 voters registered to other parties, such as Libertarians or Greens.[88] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 82.3% (vs. 53.3% in Union County) were registered to vote, including 89.5% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 70.6% countywide).[89][90]

In the 2016 presidential election, Democrat Hillary Clinton received 3,084 votes, ahead of Republican Donald Trump who had 2,517 votes, with others getting 261 votes; this is the first time in recent years that a Democrat carried New Providence in the past four elections.[91] In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 3,267 votes (53.7% vs. 32.3% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 2,726 votes (44.8% vs. 66.0%) and other candidates with 68 votes (1.1% vs. 0.8%), among the 6,080 ballots cast by the borough's 8,493 registered voters, for a turnout of 71.6% (vs. 68.8% in Union County).[92][93] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 3,367 votes (52.8% vs. 35.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 2,914 votes (45.7% vs. 63.1%) and other candidates with 64 votes (1.0% vs. 0.9%), among the 6,372 ballots cast by the borough's 8,086 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.8% (vs. 74.7% in Union County).[94] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 3,443 votes (55.5% vs. 40.3% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 2,674 votes (43.1% vs. 58.3%) and other candidates with 52 votes (0.8% vs. 0.7%), among the 6,202 ballots cast by the borough's 7,801 registered voters, for a turnout of 79.5% (vs. 72.3% in the whole county).[95]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 71.3% of the vote (2,468 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 27.0% (935 votes), and other candidates with 1.7% (60 votes), among the 3,516 ballots cast by the borough's 8,298 registered voters (53 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 42.4%.[96][97] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 2,559 votes (58.8% vs. 41.7% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 1,361 votes (31.3% vs. 50.6%), Independent Chris Daggett with 393 votes (9.0% vs. 5.9%) and other candidates with 21 votes (0.5% vs. 0.8%), among the 4,351 ballots cast by the borough's 7,961 registered voters, yielding a 54.7% turnout (vs. 46.5% in the county).[98]

Education[edit]

Salt Brook Elementary School

The New Providence School District serves students in public school for pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade.[99] As of the 2018–19 school year, the district, comprised of four schools, had an enrollment of 2,420 students and 183.8 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 13.2:1.[100] Schools in the district (with 2018–19 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[101]) are Allen W. Roberts Elementary School[102] with 702 students in grades Pre-K–6, Salt Brook Elementary School[103] with 650 students in grades K–6, New Providence Middle School[104] with 411 students in grades 7–8 and New Providence High School[105] with 625 students in grades 9–12.[106] The middle school and high school share a common building and some of the same facilities (art rooms, auditorium, east wing, west wing, gyms, music rooms, TV production room, cafeteria).

During the 2007–2008 school year, New Providence Middle School was recognized with the National Blue Ribbon School Award of Excellence by the United States Department of Education,[107] the highest award an American school can receive.[108][109] The district's high school was the top-ranked public high school in New Jersey out of 328 schools statewide in New Jersey Monthly magazine's September 2012 cover story on the state's "Top Public High Schools", after being ranked 5th in 2010 out of 322 schools listed.[110]

Serving students in Pre-K–3 through Grade 8, The Academy of Our Lady of Peace is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools and operates under the auspices of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Newark.[111] The school was one of eight private schools recognized in 2017 by the National Blue Ribbon Schools Program as an Exemplary High Performing School by the United States Department of Education.[112]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

CR 512 in New Providence

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 50.88 miles (81.88 km) of roadways, of which 44.58 miles (71.74 km) were maintained by the municipality and 6.30 miles (10.14 km) by Union County.[113]

No state, U.S. or Interstate highways directly serve New Providence. The most prominent road through the borough is County Route 512 known as Springfield Avenue.[114]

Public transportation[edit]

Commuter train station

Service on the NJ Transit Gladstone Branch of the Morris & Essex Lines is available at the New Providence station[22] and Murray Hill station,[23] offering service to Hoboken Terminal and to Penn Station in Midtown Manhattan. Two Gladstone Branch trains each weekday morning offer one-seat rides to Manhattan, and two evening trains leave New York and stop at both of New Providence's stations on the way to Gladstone. All other rail service is to or from Hoboken. These trains connect at Summit or Newark Broad Street with Manhattan-bound trains.

New Jersey Transit offer local bus service on the 986 route.[115]

Lakeland Bus Lines offers weekday rush hour service from stops along Springfield Avenue to New York's Port Authority Bus Terminal.[116]

Newark Liberty International Airport is approximately 16 miles (26 km) east of New Providence.

Economy[edit]

Companies based in New Providence include the publishers Martindale-Hubbell and R. R. Bowker.

Community activities[edit]

People and local businesses in New Providence active in organizing community activities.

In 2017, a first annual Carved Pumpkin Contest was organized.[117] In 2016 and 2017, Scarecrow Contest was organized.[118][119]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with New Providence include:

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e 2019 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 1, 2020.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b Mayor and Borough Council, Borough of New Providence. Accessed April 30, 2022.
  4. ^ 2022 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed March 1, 2022.
  5. ^ Borough Administrator, Borough of New Providence. Accessed April 30, 2022.
  6. ^ Borough Clerk, Borough of New Providence. Accessed April 30, 2022.
  7. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 94.
  8. ^ "ArcGIS REST Services Directory". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 11, 2022.
  9. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of New Providence, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 8, 2013.
  10. ^ a b QuickFacts New Providence borough, New Jersey; Union County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 21, 2022.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 20, 2013.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for New Providence, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed July 25, 2012.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 28, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for New Providence, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 28, 2013.
  15. ^ a b U.S. Census website , United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  16. ^ Geographic Codes Lookup for New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed April 1, 2022.
  17. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  18. ^ a b c d e DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for New Providence borough, Union County, New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 25, 2012.
  19. ^ a b c Municipalities Sorted by 2011-2020 Legislative District, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  20. ^ a b Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for New Providence borough Archived August 25, 2014, at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed July 25, 2012.
  21. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed July 25, 2012.
  22. ^ a b New Providence, NJ Transit. Accessed August 4, 2016.
  23. ^ a b Murray Hill, NJ Transit. Accessed August 4, 2016.
  24. ^ History of Union County, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed July 25, 2012.
  25. ^ Meola, Patricia E. "Data reveal much about life in New Providence", Independent press, December 16, 2008. Accessed July 25, 2012. "Once named Turkey Town, the more modern New Providence contains an abundance of older homes, with 84% constructed prior to 1969 and the majority of the homes built in the mid-1950s."
  26. ^ a b History Archived March 22, 2012, at the Wayback Machine, Borough of New Providence. Accessed July 25, 2012.
  27. ^ Hutchinson, Viola L. The Origin of New Jersey Place Names, New Jersey Public Library Commission, May 1945. Accessed September 10, 2015.
  28. ^ a b c d e Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 239 re New Providence, p. 241 re Springfield Township. Accessed July 25, 2012.
  29. ^ New Providence community profile, EPodunk. Accessed October 10, 2007.
  30. ^ Neavill, Mike. "Council ponders cocktail mixing booze, Open Space", The Independent Press, April 8, 2011. Accessed April 8, 2011. "Sobered by a thirst for improved recreational facilities coupled with limited funds, the governing body is taking the unprecedented move of shifting the borough from 'dry' to 'wet'. Although there are package stores in New Providence, there are no on-premises consumption licenses. Basically, the borough has been a 'bring your own' town. 'We're looking for ways to generate income for turf fields,' Mayor J. Brook Hern said."
  31. ^ Ivers, Marianne. "Two New Providence Restaurants to Obtain Liquor Licenses", TAP Into New Providence, December 23, 2015. Accessed June 28, 2016. "Councilman Robert Robinson noted that the borough has been without a liquor license for more than 100 years."
  32. ^ Angelo, Megan. "Just Like the Good Old Days in the Ring", The New York Times, March 18, 2011. Accessed July 25, 2012. ""I just called Joe and said, 'Let's develop a movie based on New Providence wrestling,' " Mr. McCarthy said.... Because of tax credits, they shot on Long Island rather than in New Providence. But they scouted locations tirelessly, most notably the office and home that Mr. Giamatti's character shuttles between.... Though the locations might have been fudged, the filmmakers kept New Providence High School in the film by using its banners, uniforms and wrestling mats, an effort facilitated by one of their former classmates, who's now the school's principal."
  33. ^ "2018 Nobel Prize in Physics laureate Arthur Ashkin delivers his Nobel Lecture at Nokia Bell Labs". Nokia news release. Retrieved September 28, 2020.
  34. ^ Salt Box Museum, New Providence Historical Society. Accessed December 2, 2019.
  35. ^ Areas touching New Providence, MapIt. Accessed March 1, 2020.
  36. ^ Union County Municipal Profiles, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed March 1, 2020.
  37. ^ New Jersey Municipal Boundaries, New Jersey Department of Transportation. Accessed November 15, 2019.
  38. ^ Locality Search, State of New Jersey. Accessed April 7, 2015.
  39. ^ Recreation - Parks and Facilities Archived March 23, 2015, at the Wayback Machine, Borough of New Providence. Accessed April 7, 2015.
  40. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed May 21, 2013.
  41. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 339. Accessed July 24, 2012.
  42. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 719. Accessed July 24, 2012.
  43. ^ Table 6. New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed June 28, 2015.
  44. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for New Providence borough, New Jersey Archived August 11, 2014, at the Wayback Machine, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 25, 2012.
  45. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for New Providence borough, Union County, New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 25, 2012.
  46. ^ Staff. "Census Results 2010: Union County", Asbury Park Press. Accessed July 25, 2012.
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