New South Wales Z20 class locomotive

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New South Wales Z20 class
NSWGR Class Z20 Locomotive.jpg
Class Z20 Locomotive in service
Type and origin
Power type Steam
Builder Beyer, Peacock & Co. (12, new)
Serial number BP 3202–3207, 3289–3294 (new)
Build date 1890–1891 (new)
Total produced 19 new, 14 rebuilt from Z19 class
Specifications
Configuration:
 • Whyte 2-6-4T
 • UIC 1'C2'nt
Gauge 4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm)
Driver dia. 4 ft 0 in (1.219 m)
Adhesive weight E(10): 77,000 lb (35 t);
A/E: 84,000 lb (38 t)
Loco weight E(10): 126,000 lb (57 t);
A/E: 137,000 lb (62 t)
Fuel type Coal
Firebox:
 • Firegrate area
18 sq ft (1.7 m2)
Boiler pressure 150 psi (1.03 MPa)
Heating surface E(10): 1,380 sq ft (128 m2);
A/E: 1,320 sq ft (123 m2)
Superheater None
Cylinders Two
Cylinder size 18 in × 24 in (457 mm × 610 mm)
Performance figures
Tractive effort 20,655 lbf (91.9 kN)
Career
Operators New South Wales Government Railways
Class New: E(10), rebuilds: A/E; both later Z20
Disposition 1 preserved, 32 scrapped

The Z20 class (formerly E.10 and A/E class) is a class of steam locomotive built for and operated by the New South Wales Government Railways of Australia.[1][2][3]

History[edit]

2007 at Kurrajong
2029 on the Moorebank branch

There was a total of 33 members of this class of 2-6-4T mixed traffic side tank locomotives. There were three differing types.

Twelve were classified E(10) class under the pre-1924 recording. These locomotives were built by Beyer, Peacock and Company and delivered in 1891 for use on Newcastle coal traffic. They proved very successful in suburban goods and coal traffic, but were unsuited to main line passenger traffic. When displaced by more powerful locomotives, many were used as shunters. Their final services were on short light branch lines, such as Richmond-Kurrajong, Carlingford, Camden, Rogans Hill and Morpeth. A number were also to be found shunting the industrial sidings at Port Kembla.[4][5]

In 1902 there was a shortage of tank locomotives. Six members of the A(93) class 0-6-0 tender engines were converted to a new A/E class tank locomotives by Eveleigh Railway Workshops. A further eight conversions were made in 1909/10. In 1911 seven new locomotives were constructed at Eveleigh. In 1924, these 21 locomotives were grouped with the twelve E(10) class to form the (Z)20-class.[6]

Later Years[edit]

As more tender locomotives became available for suburban goods traffic, the surplus locomotives of the combined class were scrapped or sold. Some of the locomotives which were sold to industrial interests include:

The last member of the class in service with the New South Wales Government Railways was 2029 which had been retained for working the Liverpool to Moorebank branch. This has been preserved by the New South Wales Rail Transport Museum, Thirlmere and cosmetically restored.[7]

Preservation[edit]

Preserved Z20 Class Locomotives
No. Description Manufacturer Year Current Organisation Location Status Ref
2029 2-6-4T passenger Eveleigh Railway Workshops 1911 NSW Rail Transport Museum Thirlmere static exhibit NSW Locomotive, Steam 2029

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Preston, Ron G (1984). Tender into Tank. Sydney: New South Wales Rail Transport Museum. pp. 11–57. ISBN 0 909862 18 4. 
  2. ^ Grunbach, Alex (1989). A Compendium of New South Wales Steam Locomotives. Sydney: Australian Railway Historical Society, NSW Division. pp. 41–45. ISBN 0 909650 27 6. 
  3. ^ New South Wales Railways 1855-1955. Published by Department of Railways
  4. ^ Preston, Ron G (1984). Tender into Tank. Sydney: New South Wales Rail Transport Museum. pp. 151–199. ISBN 0 909862 18 4. 
  5. ^ Grunbach, Alex (1989). A Compendium of New South Wales Steam Locomotives. Sydney: Australian Railway Historical Society, NSW Division. pp. 92–93, 138–139. ISBN 0 909650 27 6. 
  6. ^ Oberg, Leon (1984). Locomotives of Australia 1850's - 1980's. Frenchs Forest: Reed Books. p. 36. ISBN 0 730100 05 7. 
  7. ^ Locomotive, Steam 2029 Department of Environment & Heritage