New York City Subway rolling stock

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The "2007 Holiday Shopper's Special", which ran on December Sundays in 2007, consists of a group of R1, R4, R7A, and R9 cars
The "Holiday Shopper's Special", a train of R1, R4, R6, R7A, and R9 subway cars running in special service at the 23rd Street (Sixth Avenue) station
The empty interior of a newer R142A car on the 5 train
An R142A series car interior in service on the 4 route
A "Vaktrak" vacuuming train
A Vaktrak track vacuuming train[1]

The New York City Subway is a large rapid transit system and has a large fleet of rolling stock. As of November 2016, the New York City Subway has 6418 cars on the roster.

The system maintains two separate fleets of passenger cars: one for the A Division (numbered) routes, the other for the B Division (lettered) routes. All A Division equipment is approximately 8 feet 9 inches (2.67 m) wide and 51 feet (15.54 m) long. B Division cars, on the other hand, are about 10 feet (3.05 m) wide and either 60 feet 6 inches (18.44 m) or 75 feet 6 inches (23.01 m) long. The A Division and B Division trains operate only in their own division; operating in the other division is not allowed. All rolling stock, in both the A and B Divisions, run on the same 4 foot 8.5 inches (1,435 mm) standard gauge and use the same third-rail geometry and voltage. A typical revenue train consists of 8 to 10 cars, although in practice, range between 2 and 11 cars.

The subway's rolling stock have operated under the Interborough Rapid Transit, Brooklyn-Manhattan Transit, Independent Subway System, and their merge to the now-called New York City Transit Authority. Cars purchased by the City of New York since the inception of the IND and for the other divisions beginning in 1948 are identified by the letter "R" followed by a number. Various kinds of cars are also used for maintenance work, including flatcars and vacuum trains. Some retired fleet have also been preserved.

Total fleet[edit]

As of November 2016, the New York City Subway has 6418 cars on the roster.[2][a] The system maintains two separate fleets of passenger cars: one for the A Division routes, the other for the B Division routes. All A Division equipment is approximately 8 feet 9 inches (2.67 m) wide and 51 feet (15.54 m) long. B Division cars, on the other hand, are about 10 feet (3.05 m) wide and either 60 feet 6 inches (18.44 m) or 75 feet 6 inches (23.01 m) long. The 75-foot cars, such as R44s, R46s, R68s, and R68As, are not permitted on BMT Eastern Division – the J, L, M, and Z trains – because of sharper curves on those tracks.

The A Division and B Division trains operate only in their own division; operating in the other division is not allowed. The A Division sections have narrower tunnel segments, tighter curves, and tighter platform clearances than the B Division sections, so B Division trains cannot fit in the A Division tunnels and stations, while A Division trains would have an unacceptably large gap between the platform and train if they were allowed in the B Division lines. Also, the safety train stop (trip cock) mechanism is not compatible between divisions, being located on opposite sides of the track and train in each division. Service and maintenance trains are composed of A Division-sized cars, so they can operate with either division's clearances and have safety train stops installed on both sides of the trucks. All rolling stock, in both the A and B Divisions, run on the same 4 foot 8.5 inches (1,435 mm) standard gauge and use the same third-rail geometry and voltage.

A typical revenue train consists of 8 to 10 cars, although shuttles can be as short as two. The G runs 4-car trains, and the 7 runs 11-car trains.

When the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company entered into agreements to operate some of the new subway lines, they decided to design a new type of car, 10 feet (3.05 m) wide and 67 feet (20.42 m) long. The subject of several patents, the car's larger profile was similar to that of steam railroad coaches, permitting greater passenger capacity, more comfortable seating, and other advantages. The BRT unveiled its design, designated BMT Standard, to the public in 1913 and received such wide acceptance that all future subway lines, whether built for the BRT, the IRT,[dubious ] or eventually, the IND, were built to handle the wider cars.

When the R44s and R46s were rebuilt, the rollsigns on the side of the cars were replaced with electronic LCD signs while the front service sign remained as a rollsign. In sharp contrast, the rebuilt R32s and R38s retained rollsigns on the sides, but a flip-dot display was placed in the front. The MTA has been incorporating newer subway cars into its stock in the past two decades. Since 1999, the R142s, R142As, R143s, R160s, R179s, and R188s have been added into service.[3][4] All cars built since 1992, (including the now out-of-service R110As and R110Bs) are equipped with digital signs on the front, sides, and interior (except for the R110Bs, which had rollsigns on the front).

Old cars, some from the original companies (IRT, BMT, and IND), are preserved at the New York Transit Museum, while others have been sold to private individuals and/or other railway/trolley museums.

Between 1984 and 1989, some of the IRT trains were painted red, giving them the name Redbirds.[b] By July 2020, various older B Division cars, such as the entire fleets of R38s, R40s, R40As, R42s, and NYCTA-built R44s, were retired and replaced by newer models, including the R160s and R179s.

General Overhaul Program[edit]

The General Overhaul Program (GOH) was a mid-life overhaul program for neglected subway cars, which involved a thorough rebuilding of the fleet. Since the completion of the GOH program, the new Scheduled Maintenance System (SMS) program has replaced the GOH program by ensuring that trains do not reach a state in which they would need such an overhaul. The car types, which were part of the MTA NYCT GOH program, are the IRT Redbirds (R26, R28, R29, R33, R33S, R36), as well as IND/BMT cars (R30 GE, R32, R38, R40, R40A, R42, R44, and R46). These cars were rebuilt between 1985 and 1992. Some cars in various classes from R10 to R46 were also given lighter overhauls during this period.

"R"-prefixed orders[edit]

Cars purchased by the City of New York since the inception of the IND and for the other divisions beginning in 1948 are identified by the letter "R" followed by a number; e.g.: R46. This number is the contract number under which the cars were purchased. Cars with nearby contract numbers (e.g.: R1 through R9, or R21 through R36, or R143 through R160B) may be virtually identical, simply being purchased under different contracts.

The New York City Board of Transportation settled on a system of documentation that is still in place under MTA New York City Transit. This included a prefix letter or letters that indicated the Department that the specific documentation, followed by a series of numbers of a length defined by the specific department concerned. For example, the Surface Department used the letter "S", while the Rapid Transit Department used the letter "R". A new R- number is assigned for any vehicle purchase involving a bidding process. Since the 1970s, the system has suffered from "R- inflation" going through only 46 R- numbers in its first 40 years, but over 114 in its subsequent 30. Possible reasons include an increased number of specialized maintenance vehicles that were previously made in house or a lower floor for requiring a formal bidding process to reduce waste and abuse.[citation needed]

Disposal at sea[edit]

Retired subway cars being transported to the ocean, where they will be dropped into the water to create an artificial reef

In 2001, the New York City Transit Authority started disposing of retired subway cars by dumping them at sea to create artificial reefs, with the intention of promoting marine life. This option was chosen because it was less expensive than removing asbestos from the cars; the asbestos was determined to not be a hazard in the ocean.[5] Further, the artificial reefs would provide environmental and economic benefits, such as providing shelter for marine animals and creating new fishing opportunities. The first reef constructed was Redbird Reef in Delaware. Eventually, multiple states received retired subway cars for reefs.[6] The program was discontinued in 2010, after more than 2,500 cars were reefed, because newer cars contained more plastic, which was too expensive to economically remove before reefing.[7][8]

Current fleet[edit]

Contract # Division Year Built Builder Car
Length[c]
Car
Width
Photo Fleet numbers
(Total ordered)
Amount in service CBTC Assigned Services
(As of April 27, 2020)
Yard
assignment
Notes
R32 B 1964–1965 Budd Company 60 feet (18.3 m) 10 feet (3.0 m) MTA NYC Subway J train leaving Lorimer St..JPG
  • 3350–3949
    (600 total)
136 No "J" train "Z" train
  • Married pairs; even numbered cars have motor generator and battery, odd numbered cars have air compressor.
  • Mismatched pairs common due to losses from accidents.
  • First production cars made out of stainless steel.
R44 B 1971–1973 St. Louis Car
Company
75 feet (22.9 m) 10 feet (3.0 m) MTA Staten Island Railway local train at Oakwood Heights.jpg
  • 388–435
  • 436–466 (even
    numbers only)
    (352 total)
61
SIR only
No NYCS-bull-trans-SIR-Std.svg – 61 cars
  • Single cars; even numbered cars ("A" cars) have single full-width cabs, odd numbered cars ("B" cars) have blind ends.
  • New York City Subway car numbers were originally 100–387 and renumbered 5202–5479 (see here).
R46 B 1975–1978 Pullman Company 75 feet (22.9 m) 10 feet (3.0 m)
  • 5482–6207
    (4-car sets)
  • 6208–6258
    (even numbers only)
    (754 total)
750 No "A" train – 216 cars (27 trains, AM rush)
224 cars (28 trains, PM rush)
"C" train – 72 cars (9 trains, AM rush)
 – 64 cars (8 trains, PM rush
"N" train "W" train – 144 cars (18 trains)
"Q" train – 168 cars (21 trains)
Rockaway Park Shuttle – 12 cars (3 trains)[9]
  • 5482–6207 are in A-B-B-A configuration as 4-car sets.
    • Even numbered cars have single full-width cabs, and are known as "A" cars
    • Odd numbered cars have blind ends, and are known as "B" cars.
  • 6208–6258 are in A-A configuration (even numbers only).
  • Car numbers were originally 500–1227 and 1228–1278 (even numbers only).
  • Two cars (941 & 1054) wrecked and scrapped prior to General Overhaul.
  • Two cars (6150 & 6151) wrecked after General Overhaul.[10]
R62 A 1983–1985 Kawasaki Heavy
Industries
51 feet (15.5 m) 8 feet 9 inches (2.7 m) NYCSubway1551.jpg 1301–1625
(325 total)
315 No "3" train – 260 cars (26 trains)[11]
  • Originally single cars, now 5-car sets.
  • 10 cars (1366–1370, 1435–1437, 1439–1440) wrecked and scrapped.
    • 1366–1370 were wrecked in 2000 due to an accident. Car 1369 was scrapped in 2005. Car 1366 and half of car 1370 are at the FDNY Randall's Island training center. Cars 1367 and 1368 were reefed in 2008.
    • 1435–1437 and 1439–1440 were wrecked in 1991 due to a derailment. 1437 and 1439–1440 were scrapped in 2001. Car 1436 was reefed in 2008. 1438 is now part of a 5-car set with 1431–1434.
R62A A 1984–1987 Bombardier Transportation 51 feet (15.5 m) 8 feet 9 inches (2.7 m) MTA NYC Subway 1 train leaving 125th St.jpg 1651–2475
(825 total)
822 No "1" train – 310 cars (31 trains)
"6" train – 370 cars (37 trains)
42nd Street Shuttle – 7 cars (2 trains)[12]
  • Originally single cars, most cars linked in 3, 4, or 5-car sets.
    • 1651–1905, 1961–2475, and select other 1900s have full-width cabs at ends of sets.
  • 1909 was wrecked and scrapped.[13]
R68 B 1986–1988 Westinghouse-Amrail Company 75 feet (22.9 m) 10 feet (3.0 m) NYCSubway2590.jpg 2500–2924
(425 total)
425 No "B" train – 48 cars (6 trains, AM rush)
 – 40 cars (5 trains, PM rush)
"D" train – 232 cars (29 trains, AM rush)
 – 224 cars (28 trains, PM rush)
"G" train – 52 cars (13 trains)
"N" train "W" train – 24 cars (3 trains)
"Q" train – 8 cars (1 train, PM rush)
Franklin Avenue Shuttle – 4 cars (2 trains)[14]
  • Originally single cars.
    • 2500–2915 are now in 4-car sets.
    • 2916–2924 are singles used for the Franklin Avenue Shuttle.
R68A B 1988–1989 Kawasaki Heavy
Industries
75 feet (22.9 m) 10 feet (3.0 m) R68A B train at Prospect Park.jpg 5001–5200
(200 total)
200 No "A" train – 8 cars (1 train, PM rush)
"B" train – 152 cars (19 trains, AM rush)
 – 144 cars (18 trains, PM rush)
"N" train "W" train – 16 cars (2 trains)[15]
  • Originally single cars, now in 4-car sets.
R142 A 1999–2003 Bombardier
Transportation
51 feet (15.5 m) 8 feet 9 inches (2.7 m) NYCSubway6476.jpg 1101–1250,
6301–7180
(1030 total)
1025 Future installation[16] "2" train – 360 cars (36 trains)
 – 350 cars (35 trains, PM rush)
"4" train – 180 cars (18 trains)
"5" train – 350 cars (35 trains, AM rush)
 – 360 cars (36 trains, PM rush)[17]
  • All cars are sequentially numbered in A-B-B-B-A configuration as 5-car sets.
    • Cars ending in 1, 5, 6 and 0 have single full-width cabs and are known as "A" cars.
    • Cars ending in all other digits have no cabs and are known as "B" cars.
  • Cars 6346–6350 are out of service after suffering fire damage.[18][19]
R142A A 1999–2004 Kawasaki Heavy
Industries
51 feet (15.5 m) 8 feet 9 inches (2.7 m) 4 train leaving Harlem on August night.jpg 7591–7810
(220 total)
220 Future installation[16] "4" train – 170 cars (17 trains, AM rush)
 – 160 cars (16 trains, PM rush)[20]
  • All cars are sequentially numbered in A-B-B-B-A configuration as 5-car sets.
    • Cars ending in 1, 5, 6 and 0 have single full-width cabs and are known as "A" cars.
    • Cars ending in all other digits have no cabs and are known as "B" cars.
  • Original order was 7211–7810; cars 7211–7590 were converted to R188s between 2011 & 2016 for the IRT Flushing Line.[21]
R143 B 2001–2003 Kawasaki Heavy
Industries
60 feet (18.3 m) 10 feet (3.0 m) 8101–8312
(212 total)
212 Yes "L" train – 176 cars (22 trains)[22]
  • All cars are sequentially numbered in A-B-B-A configuration.
R160 B 2005–2010 Alstom Transportation
Kawasaki Heavy
Industries
60 feet (18.3 m) 10 feet (3.0 m) MTA NYC Subway F train arriving at Avenue P.JPG 8313–9974
(1662 total)
1662 8313–8380 only; future installation for remaining cars[23] "J" train "Z" train – 88 cars (11 trains, AM rush)
 – 80 cars (10 trains, PM rush)
"L" train – 16 cars (2 trains)
"M" train – 192 cars (24 trains, AM rush)
 – 184 cars (23 trains, PM rush)[24]
"E" train – 260 cars (26 trains)
"F" train – 460 cars (46 trains)
"N" train "W" train – 100 cars (10 trains)
"R" train – 290 cars (29 trains)[25]
  • 4 car sets (8313–8652, 9943–9974) are sequentially numbered in A-B-B-A configuration.
  • 5 car sets (8653–9942) are sequentially numbered in A-B-B-B-A configuration.
    • Cars with single full-width cabs are known as "A" cars.
    • Cars with no cabs are known as "B" cars.
R179 B 2016–2019 Bombardier
Transportation
60 feet (18.3 m) 10 feet (3.0 m) MTA NYC Subway A train arriving at Broad Channel.jpg 3010–3327
(318 total)
318
(in storage)
Future installation[26] "A" train – 110 cars (11 trains)
"C" train – 72 cars (9 trains)
"J" train "Z" train – 72 cars (9 trains)[27]
  • 4-car sets (3050–3237) are sequentially numbered in A-B-B-A configuration.
  • 5-car sets (3010–3049, 3238–3327) are sequentially numbered in A-B-B-B-A configuration.
  • Cars will single full-width cabs are known as A cars.
  • Cars with no cab are known as B cars.
  • All units currently out of service due to cars separating from each other.[28]
R188 A 2011–2016 Kawasaki Heavy Industries 51 feet (15.5 m) 8 feet 9 inches (2.7 m) R188 7 train.jpg 7211–7590,
7811–7936
(506 total)
506 Yes "7" train – 418 cars (38 trains, AM rush)
407 cars (37 trains, PM rush)[29]
  • All cars are in 5-car or 6-car sets to form 11-car trains for IRT Flushing Line service.
  • Order consists of a combination of 126 new cars & R142A conversions by the manufacturer, totaling 380 car conversions.[21][30]
    • Conversion sets numbered 7211–7590 are numbered as follows:
      • Cars ending in 0, 1, 5, and 6 have single full-width cabs and are known as "A" cars.
      • Cars ending in all other digits have no cabs and are known as "B" cars.
    • Cars 7811–7898 are eight new 11-car trains (split into four 5-car trains and four 6-car trains), with cars sequentially numbered.
      • Cars whose numbers give a remainder of 0, 1, 5, and 6 when divided by 11 have single full-width cabs and are known as "A" cars.
      • Cars whose numbers give other remainders when divided by 11 have no cabs and are known as "B" cars.
    • Cars 7899–7936 are "C" cars that are linked with converted R142A sets expand the sets to six cars.

Maintenance vehicles[edit]

Various kinds of cars are used for maintenance work, including flatcars and vacuum trains.[31]

Track geometry car[edit]

There are four track geometry cars on the New York City Subway that measure the system's track geometry to ensure that safe train operation is maintained. The cars are numbered TGC1–TGC4. TGC1 was ordered under contract R59 in 1984 for $1.4 million,[32] TGC2 was ordered under contract R63 and cost $2.5 million,[33][34] and the other two were ordered under an unknown contract. The cars use sensors, measuring systems, and data management systems to get a profile of the tracks. The train crew consists of two-track equipment maintainers, one maintenance supervisor, and two to three engineers. The trains typically operate during off-peak weekday daytime hours so as to not interfere more frequent rush hour service. A single car weighs 45 tons.[34] The cars measure:

  • Alignment – “Alignment is the projection of the track geometry of each rail or the track center line onto the horizontal plane,” (FRA Definition).[35] Also known as the “straightness” of the tracks.
  • Crosslevel – The variation in the cant of the track over the length of a predetermined “chord” length (generally 62 feet or 18.90 meters). On straight or tangent track, ideally, there should be no variation, while on curves, a cant is generally desired.
  • Curvature — The amount by which the rail deviates from being straight or tangent. The geometry car checks the actual curvature (in Degree of curvature) of a curve versus its design curvature.
  • Rail gauge — The distance between the rails. Over time, rail may become too wide or too narrow. In North America and most of the world, standard gauge is 4 ft 8½ in (1,435 mm).
  • Rail profile — Looks for rail wear and deviations from standard profile.
  • Warp – The maximum change in crosslevel over a predetermined chord length (generally sixty-two feet).[36]
  • Corrugation of running rail surface
  • Tunnel and station platform clearances
  • Third rail height and gauge
  • Vertical gap between third rail and protective board [37]

The track geometry car typically checks each stretch of track about 6 times a year; the car is manually operated, and there are no plans to automate inspection of the track geometry, which is done manually with the help of high-tech equipment aboard the car.[38]

Future fleet[edit]

Contract # Division Year Built Builder Total Photo
(mock-up or rendering)
Notes
R211 B 2020–2025 (projected) Kawasaki Heavy Industries 535 cars (460 for New York City Subway; 75 for Staten Island Railway)[39] MTA First Look at New R211 Subway Car Class (49419947913).jpg To replace all remaining R44s and R46s, and to expand the fleet for the Second Avenue Subway. CBTC-equipped. 20 cars to feature open gangways. Potential option orders for up to 1,612 cars.
R262 A 2020s TBA 1,364 cars R262 Prototype Rendering (49579487123).png To replace all R62s and R62As, and to expand the fleet. CBTC-equipped. All cars to feature open gangways.[16]:25

Originally, 168 additional cars were proposed to be built and provided for service on the E, G, L, and N services between 2015 and 2019; the contract number for these growth cars was unknown, but they were not delivered prior to 2019.

Retired fleet[edit]

IRT Pre-Unification listing[edit]

Designation Year built Builder Fleet total Car numbers Year
retired
Denotes
Composite 1903–1904 Jewett,
St. Louis Car,
Stephenson,
Wason
500 2000–2159,
3000–3339
1916
1950
2000–2159: Non-powered Trailers only
Retired from Subway service in 1916;
re-equipped with lightweight trucks and components; and continued in elevated service until 1950.
Hi-V "Gibbs" 1904–1905 American Car & Foundry 300 3350–3649 1959
Hi-V "Deck Roof" 1907–1908 American Car & Foundry 50 3650–3699 1959
Hi-V "Hedley" 1910–1911 American Car & Foundry,
Standard Steel,
Pressed Steel
325 ACF: 3700–3809,
SS: 3810–3849,
PS: 3850–4024
1959
1915 Pullman 292 4223–4514 1959 Non-powered Trailers only;
4223–4250 in their last years were motorized as blind motors with no controls.
Lo-V "Flivver" 1915 Pullman 178 4037–4214 1962 Were built with the original trucks and electrical components removed from the Composites.
Lo-V "Steinway" 1915–1916 Pullman 110 4025–4036,
4215–4222,
4555–4576,
4700–4770
1969 Equipped with special gearing for the steep grades of the Steinway Tunnels.
Lo-V "Standard" 1916–1917 Pullman 695 4515–4554,
4577–4699,
4771–5302
1969 4515–4554 and 4811–4965 were non-powered trailers
1922 Pullman 100 5303–5402 1963 Non-powered trailers
5303–5377 equipped with air compressors for brakes
1924–1925 American Car & Foundry 225 5403–5627 1964
Lo-V "Steinway" 1925 American Car & Foundry 25 5628–5652 1964 Equipped with special gearing for the steep grades of the Steinway Tunnels.
Lo-V "World's Fair" 1938 St. Louis Car 50 5653–5702 1969 *Single-ended cars used for the 1939 World's Fair.

BMT Pre-Unification listing[edit]

Designation Year built Builder Fleet
total
Car numbers Year
retired
Denotes
AB Standard 1914–1919 American Car & Foundry 600 2000–2599 1969
1920–1922 Pressed Steel 300 2600–2899
1924 50 4000–4049 1961 Non-powered Trailers only
BMT-SIRT (ME-1) 1925–1926 Standard Steel 25 2900–2924 1961 25 motor cars purchased from the Staten Island Railway in 1954.
D-type Triplex 1925–1928 Pressed Steel 121 6000–6120 1965
Green Hornet 1934 Pullman 1 7003 1942 Experimental unit; scrapped in 1942 for World War II.
Zephyr 1934 Budd 1 7029 1954 Experimental unit
Multi 1936 St. Louis Car 10 7004–7013 1961
Pullman 15 7014–7028
Bluebird 1938, 1940 Clark 6 8000–8005 1957

R-type listing[edit]

Contract # Year built Division Builder Fleet
total
Car numbers Year
retired
R1 1930–1931 IND American Car & Foundry 300 100–399 1977
R4 1932–1933 500 400–899 1977
R-6-3 1935–1936 250 900–1149 1977
R-6-2 1936 Pullman 150 1150–1299 1977
R-6-1 1936 Pressed Steel 100 1300–1399 1977
R7 1937 American Car & Foundry,

Pullman

150 ACF: 1400–1474,
Pullman: 1475–1549
1977
R7A 1938 100 Pullman: 1550–1599,
ACF: 1600–1649
1977
R9 1940 IND,

BMT

American Car & Foundry,

Pressed Steel

153 ACF: 1650–1701,
PS: 1702–1802
1977
R10 1948–1949 American Car & Foundry 400 1803–1852[d]
3000–3349
1989
R11 1949 Budd 10 8010–8019 1977
Test trains; rebuilt into R34 cars in 1965.
R12 1948 IRT American Car & Foundry 100 5703–5802[e] 1981
R14 1949 150 5803–5952 1984
R15 1950 100 5953–5999,
6200–6252
1984
R16 1954–1955 BMT,

IND

American Car & Foundry 200 6300–6499 1987
R17 1954–1956 IRT St. Louis Car 400 6500–6899 1988
R21 1956–1957 250 7050–7299 1987
R22 1957–1958 450 7300–7749 1987
R26 1959–1960 American Car & Foundry 110 7750–7859 2002
Semi-married pairs
Even numbered cars have motor-generator and battery, odd numbered cars have air compressor.
R27 1960–1961 IND,

BMT

St. Louis Car 230 8020–8249 1990
Married pairs
Even numbered cars have motor-generator and battery, odd numbered cars have air compressor.
R28 1960–1961 IRT American Car & Foundry 100 7860–7959 2002
Semi-married pairs
Even numbered cars have motor-generator and battery, odd numbered cars have air compressor.
R29 1962 IRT St. Louis Car 236 8570–8805 2002
Married pairs
Even numbered cars have motor-generator and battery, odd numbered cars have air compressor.
Rebuilt into R99 cars from 1985 to 1987.
R30 1961–1962 IND,

BMT

St. Louis Car 320 R30: 8250–8351
8412–8569
R30A: 8352–8411
1993
Married pairs
Even numbered cars have motor-generator and battery, odd numbered cars have air compressor.
R33 1962–1963 IRT St. Louis Car 500 8806–9305 2003
Married pairs
Even numbered cars have motor-generator and battery, odd numbered cars have air compressor.
R33S 1963 IRT St. Louis Car 40 9306–9345 2003
single cars, built for IRT Flushing Line
R34 see R11
R36 1963–1964 IRT St. Louis Car 424 9346–9769 2003
Married pairs
Even numbered cars have motor-generator and battery, odd numbered cars have air compressor.
R38 1966–1967 IND,

BMT

St. Louis Car 200 3950–4149 2009
Married pairs
Even numbered cars have motor-generator and battery, odd numbered cars have air compressor.
R39 Never built IRT,

BMT

Intended to replace old equipment running on the BMT Myrtle Avenue Line in Brooklyn and the IRT Third Avenue Line in The Bronx
Would have been built to IRT dimensions of the R38 and ordered in the late 1960s or early 1970s
Order scrapped when the Myrtle Avenue Line south of the junction with the BMT Jamaica Line was discontinued in 1969 and the remaining Third Avenue Line in 1973
The Budd Company used a possible outline of this car as U.S. Patent 3,151,538.
R40 1967–
1968
IND,

BMT

St. Louis Car Company 200 4150–4349 2009
Slanted ends, married pairs
Even numbered cars have motor-generator and battery, odd numbered cars have air compressor.
Car numbers were originally 4150–4249, 4350–4449
R40A 1968–1969 IND,

BMT

St. Louis Car
Company
200 4350–4549 2009
Married pairs
Even numbered cars have motor-generator and battery, odd numbered cars have air compressor.
Car numbers were originally 4250–4349 (straight ends),[40] 4450–4549 (slanted ends)[41]
R42 1969–1970 IND,

BMT

St. Louis Car
Company
400 4550–4949 2020
Married pairs
Even numbered cars have motor-generator and battery, odd numbered cars have air compressor.
R44 (NYCT cars) 1971–1973 IND,

BMT

St. Louis Car
Company
288 100–387 2010 (NYCT cars)
4-car sets (A-B-B-A) formation. A cars have cabs on one end, while B cars have no cabs. Car numbers were originally 100–387. 278 cars were renumbered to 5202–5479 between 1991 & 1993.
R55 Never built IND,

BMT

The R55 was a proposed car[42] for the B Division (IND/BMT).
It was considered in the early 1980s, but never left the drawing board.
This order later evolved into the future R68.
R99 see R29
R110A 1992 IRT Kawasaki 10 8001–8010 1999
(Built as Contract R130)
New Technology demonstrator
Cars ending in 1, 5, 6 and 0 have single full-width cabs, and are known as "A" cars.
Cars ending in 2, 3, 4, 7, 8 and 9 have no cabs, and are known as "B" cars.
All cars are sequentially numbered in A-B-B-B-A configuration as 5-car sets.

As of 2014, cars 8001, 8005–8006, and 8010 are stored at 207th Street Yard. Cars 8002–8004 and 8007–8009 were converted into flood pump cleanup cars in 2013.

R110B 1992 IND,

BMT

Bombardier 9 3001–3009 2000
(Built as Contract R131)
New Technology demonstrator, 67-foot (20 m) car
Cars ending in 1, 3, 4, 6, 7 and 9 have single full-width cabs, and are known as "A" cars.
Cars ending in 2, 5 and 8 have no cabs, and are known as "B" cars.
All cars are sequentially numbered in A-B-A configuration as 3-car sets.
As of 2015, cars 3002–3003, 3007, and 3009 are stored at 207th Street Yard. The other five are used for training at various facilities.

Preserved cars[edit]

Many antique cars have been preserved, dating from 1878. These cars from their private companies: Interborough Rapid Transit, Brooklyn-Manhattan Transit, Independent Subway System, and their merge to the now-called New York City Transit Authority, are preserved in the New York Transit Museum, as well as other museums and private ownerships across the United States and Europe. Other retired cars serve as converted work cars or long-term storage. This list contains all fleets from the earliest IRT elevated gate cars, Manhattan El, to the latest non-New Technology Train, R68A, that have at least a unit surviving. There are also work trains that resemble passenger cars—R65 and R127/R134—and two prototype New Technology Trains—R110A and R110B.

Retired fleets[edit]

Designation/Contract # Builder Total Number of Fleet Initial Year Built Year Retired Number Scrapped Number Preserved Number in Service Surviving Fleet Numbers Notes
Manhattan El[43] Pullman, Wason, Gilbert & Bush, Bowers & Dure, Barney & Smith, Jewett, St. Louis, Cincinnati, American Car and Foundry 1,813 1878 1955[44] 1,809 4 0
BU car Osgood-Bradley, Brill, Cincinnati, Laconia, Pullman, Gilbert & Bush, Harlan & Hollingsworth, Wason, Pressed Steel, John Stephenson, Jewett 954[47] 1884 1958 945 9 0
  • 197, 659, 1227, 1349, 1362 at Shore Line Trolley Museum
  • 1365 at National Museum of Transportation in St. Louis, Missouri
  • (See 1273, 1404, 1407 in Q-type Queens car section).
  • 197, 659, 1362, 1365 inoperable
Gibbs Hi-V American Car and Foundry 300 1904 1959 299 1 0
Deck Roof Hi-V American Car and Foundry 50 1907 1959 49 1 0
  • 3662 at Shore Line Trolley Museum
  • 3662 inoperable
AB Standard American Car and Foundry, Pressed Steel 950 1914 1969 945 5 0
  • 2204, 2390, 2391, 2392 at New York Transit Museum in Downtown Brooklyn, New York City, NY
  • 2775 at Shore Line Trolley Museum
  • 2204, 2775 inoperable[49]
Standard Lo-V Pressed Steel, American Car and Foundry, Pullman 1,020 1916 1969 1,013 7 0
  • 4902, 5290, 5292, 5443, 5483 at New York Transit Museum
  • 5466 at Shore Line Trolley Museum
  • 5600 at Trolley Museum of New York in Kingston, NY
ME-1 Standard Steel 100 1925 1973 98 2 0
  • 366 at Seashore Trolley Museum
  • 388 at Shore Line Trolley Museum
  • Both cars inoperable
D-type Triplex Pressed Steel 121 1925 1965 118 3 0
  • 6019 A-B-C, 6095 A-B-C, 6112 A-B-C at New York Transit Museum
  • 6019 A-B-C inoperable
Q-type Queens car Brooklyn-Manhattan Transit Corporation 114 1938 1969 109 5 0
  • 1602A at Trolley Museum of New York
  • 1612C, 1622A, 1622B, 1622C at New York Transit Museum
  • 1602A, 1612C inoperable
  • 1622A, 1622B, and 1622C were converted into BU cars 1407, 1273, and 1404 in 1979, while keeping its Q-type 1957 lowered roofs and 1950 lightweight trucks and motors.[51][52]
World's Fair Lo-V St. Louis 50 1938 1969 49 1 0
  • 5655 at New York Transit Museum
R1 American Car and Foundry 300 1930 1977 296 4 0
  • 100, 103, 381 at New York Transit Museum
  • 175 at Seashore Trolley Museum
  • 175 inoperable; no trucks, stripped and is used as storage and source for spare parts for the museum
R4 American Car and Foundry 500 1932 1977 496 4 0
  • 401, 484 at New York Transit Museum
  • 800 at Seashore Trolley Museum
  • 825 at Trolley Museum of New York
  • 401 has two side doors from R1 175 that lack small handle notches below the door window.
R6 American Car and Foundry, Pullman, Pressed Steel 500 1935 1977 493 7 0
  • 923, 925, 1000, 1300 at New York Transit Museum
  • 978 owned by private owner in Warwick, NY[53]
  • 983 at Craggy Mountain Line in Asheville, NC[54]
  • 1144 at Buckinghamshire Railway Centre in Aylesbury, England
  • 923, 925 inoperable
  • 978 inoperable; no trucks, part sliced away
  • 983 is operational with scrapped R32 trucks.
  • 1144 inoperable; serving as a cafeteria for the museum, no trucks
R7 American Car and Foundry, Pullman 150 1937 1977 149 1 0
  • 1440 at Seashore Trolley Museum
R7A American Car and Foundry, Pullman 100 1938 1977 99 1 0
  • 1575 at New York Transit Museum
  • 1575 has an R10 appearance, while mechanically and electrically an R7A.
R9 American Car and Foundry, Pressed Steel 153 1940 1977 150 3 0
  • 1689 at Shore Line Trolley Museum
  • 1801 at New York State Museum in Albany, NY
  • 1802 at New York Transit Museum
  • 1801 inoperable
R10 American Car and Foundry 400 1948 1989 398 2 0
  • 3184, 3189 at New York Transit Museum
  • 3189 inoperable
R11/R34 Budd 10 1949 1977 9 1 0
  • 8013 at New York Transit Museum
R12 American Car and Foundry 100 1948 1981 98 2 0
  • 5760, 35782 (ex-5782) at New York Transit Museum
  • 35782 inoperable
R14 American Car and Foundry 150 1949 1984 148 1 (1 in work service)
  • 5944 (renumbered RD340) as De-Icer car
  • 35871 (ex-5871) at New York Transit Museum
  • 35871 inoperable
R15 American Car and Foundry 100 1950 1984 99 1 0
  • 6239 at New York Transit Museum
R16 American Car and Foundry 200 1954 1987 196 4 0
  • 6305, 6339, 6387 at New York Transit Museum
  • 6398 at Trolley Museum of New York
R17 St. Louis 400 1954 1988 393 2 (2 in work service) (+3 in storages)
  • 6609 at New York Transit Museum
  • 6688 at Shore Line Trolley Museum
  • 6813, 6850 (renumbered DCR06, DCR07) as storage cars at Coney Island Yard, Brooklyn, New York City, NY[55]
  • 6835, 6899 (renumbered P6835, P6899) as Hose Reach cars[56]
  • 36895 (ex-6895) as storage car at Concourse Yard, The Bronx, New York City, NY
R21 St. Louis 250 1956 1987 238 2 (2 in work service) (+8 in storages)
  • 7055, 7210, 7211, 7243, 7278, 7289, 7296 (renumbered DCR01, CCR08, CCR04, CCR02, CCR06, CCR05, CCR07) as storage cars at Coney Island Yard
  • 7121 (renumbered P7121) as Hose Reach car
  • 7194, 7203 (renumbered 0R714, 51050) at New York Transit Museum
  • 7287 (renumbered RD345) as De-Icer car[57]
  • G7267 (ex-7267) as storage car at Concourse Yard
  • 7203 inoperable
R22 St. Louis 450 1957 1987 430 2 (10 in work service) (+8 in storages)
  • 7303, 7340, 7446, 7505, 7657, 7659, 7691 (renumbered CCR01, CCR03, DCR03, DCR04, DCR02, DCR05, DCR08) as storage cars at Coney Island Yard
  • 7346, 7376, 7413, 7432, 7571, 7629 (renumbered P7346, P7376, P7413, P7432, P7571, P7629) as Hose Reach cars
  • 7371 at Seashore Trolley Museum
  • 7397, 7441, 7608, 7633 (renumbered RD342, RD344, RD343, RD341) as De-Icer cars
  • 7422 (renumbered 1R714) at New York Transit Museum
  • G7486 (ex-7486) as storage car at 207th Street Yard, Manhattan, New York City, NY
R26 American Car and Foundry 110 1959 2002 108 2 0
  • 7774–7775 at New York Transit Museum
R28 American Car and Foundry 100 1959 2002 96 4 0
R29/R99 St. Louis 236 1962 2002 234 2 0
  • 8678–8679 at New York Transit Museum
R30 St. Louis 320 1961 1993 315 1 (2 in work service) (+2 in storage)
  • 8429, 8558 as Rail Adhesion cars[58]
  • 8481, 8522 as storage cars at 207th Street Yard
  • 8506 at New York Transit Museum
  • 8506 inoperable
R33 Main Line St. Louis 500 1962 2003 447 11 (42 in work service)
  • 8816–8817 (renumbered RD413–RD412), 8820–8821 (renumbered RD425–RD424), 8858–8859 (renumbered RD404–RD405), 8862–8863 (renumbered RD422–RD423), 8868 (renumbered RD406), 8878–8879 (renumbered RD430–RD431), 8890–8891 (renumbered RD408–RD409), 8892–8893 (renumbered RD434–RD435), 8914–8915 (renumbered RD436, RD439), 8936–8937 (renumbered RD438–RD437), 8954–8955 (renumbered RD410–RD411), 8956–8957 (renumbered RD403–RD402), 8964–8965 (renumbered RD416–RD417), 8986–8987 (renumbered RD401–RD400), 9020–9021 (renumbered RD414–RD415), 9032–9033 (renumbered RD421–RD420), 9038–9039 (renumbered RD428–RD429), 9066–9067 (renumbered RD418–RD419), 9070–9071 (renumbered RD427–RD426), 9138–9139 (renumbered RD433–RD432) as Rider cars[59]
  • 8885 as Rail Adhesion car
  • 8912–8913 at Tiffany Street Iron Shops in Hunts Point, The Bronx, New York City, NY
  • 8950–8951 (renumbered RD440–RD441) as De-Icer cars
  • 9010–9011, 9016–9017, 9068–9069, 9206–9207 at New York Transit Museum
  • 9075 at outside Queens Borough Hall in Kew Gardens, Queens, New York City, NY
  • 8912–8913 are inoperable, as they are placed on an elevated structure as a static display.[60]
  • 9075 is inoperable, as it is a converted tourist center with modified swinging doors.
R33S St. Louis 40 1963 2003 10 6 (22 in work service) (+2 in storage)
  • 9306, 9307, 9308, 9310, 9343 at New York Transit Museum
  • 9309, 9311, 9315, 9316, 9319, 9322, 19323 (ex-9323), 9324, 9325, 9326, 9329, 19330 (ex-9330), 9331, 9332, 19334 (ex-9334), 19335 (ex-9335), 19336 (ex-9336), 19337 (ex-9337), 9340, 9341, 19342 (ex-9342), 19345 (ex-9345) as Garbage cars, Rail Adhesion cars, Signal Dolly cars
  • 9327 at Seashore Trolley Museum
  • 19333 (ex-9333), 19344 (ex-9344) as storage cars at 207th Street Yard
  • 9343 inoperable
R36 Main Line St. Louis 34 1964 2003 32 2 0
  • 9542–9543 at New York Transit Museum
R36 World's Fair St. Louis 390 1963 2003 384 2 (2 in work service) (+2 in storage)
  • 9582–9583 as storage cars at Unionport Yard, The Bronx, New York City, NY
  • 9584–9585 as Rail Adhesion cars, Garbage cars, Signal Dolly cars
  • 9586–9587 at New York Transit Museum
R38 St. Louis 200 1966 2009 198 2 0
  • 4028–4029 at New York Transit Museum
R40 St. Louis 200 1967 2009 198 2 0
  • 4280–4281 at New York Transit Museum
R40A St. Louis 200 1967 2009 196 4 0
  • 4460, 4480–4481 at New York Transit Museum
  • 4461 at Randall's Island FDNY Facility in Randalls and Wards Islands, New York City, NY[61]
  • 4461 inoperable; rebuilt into slant car and is used as FDNY training car
R42 St. Louis 400 1969 2020 345 5 (8 in work service) (+42 in storages)
  • 4572–4573, 4665 at New York Transit Museum
  • 4736–4737 at Transit Tech High School in East New York, Brooklyn, New York City, NY
  • 4788–4789, 4792–4793, 4794–4795, 4796–4797, 4798–4799, 4800–4801, 4802–4803, 4804–4805, 4808–4809, 4810–4811, 4812–4813, 4814–4815, 4816–4817, 4820–4821, 4822–4823, 4824–4825, 4828–4829, 4832–4833, 4834–4835, 4836–4837, 4838–4839 as storage cars at various subway yards
  • 4790–4791, 4806–4807, 4826–4827, 4830–4831 as Garbage cars, Rail Adhesion cars
  • 4736–4737 inoperable; educational/vocational uses
State-of-the-Art Car St. Louis 2 1972 1977 0 2 0
  • 1, 2 at Seashore Trolley Museum
  • Both cars inoperable
R110A Kawasaki Heavy Industries 10 1992 1999 0 0 (6 in work service) (+4 in storage)
  • 8001, 8005–8006, 8010 as storage cars at 207th Street Yard
  • 8002–8004, 8007–8009 (renumbered P8002–P8004, P8007–P8009) as Hose Reach cars
  • 8001, 8005–8006, 8010 inoperable; most cars missing components
R110B Bombardier Transportation 9 1992 2000 0 5 (+4 in storage)
  • 3001 at NYPD Police Academy in College Point, Queens, New York City, NY
  • 3002–3003, 3007, 3009 as storage cars at 207th Street Yard
  • 3004, 3006 at Coney Island Yard's firefighting facility
  • 3005 at P.S. 248, NYC Transit Learning Center in Gravesend, Brooklyn, New York City, NY
  • 3008 at near Randall's Island FDNY Facility
  • All cars inoperable
  • 3001's part sliced away

Active fleets[edit]

Contract # Builder Total Number of Fleet Initial Year Built Year Retired Number Scrapped Number Preserved Number in Service Surviving Fleet Numbers Notes
R32/R32A Budd 600 1964 360 8 222 in regular service/in storages (10 in work service)
  • 3350–3351, 3352–3353 at New York Transit Museum
  • 3494–3495, 13510–13511 (ex-3510–3511), 13552–13553 (ex-3552–3553), 3642–3643, 3694–3695 as Garbage cars, Rail Adhesion cars, Signal Dolly cars
  • 3594–3595 at Floyd Bennett Field in Marine Park, Brooklyn, New York City, NY
  • 3786–3787 at Coney Island Yard
  • 3594–3595 are used as NYPD training cars and are not operable.
  • 3786–3787 are used as derailment re-railing training cars.
R44 St. Louis 352 1971 2010 (NYCT cars) 284 1 61 in regular service (+6 in storages)
  • 399, 5286–5289 as storage cars at Coney Island Yard
  • 466 as storage car at Clifton Yard, Staten Island, New York City, NY
  • 5240 at New York Transit Museum
  • 5240 inoperable
R46 Pullman 754 1974 2 0 750 in regular service (+2 in storage)
  • 6150 as storage car and 6151 as mockup car at 207th Street Yard
  • 6151 is inoperable, and its interior have strip maps, colored wraps, some removed seats, and added fold-up seats for future retrofits.[62]
R62 Kawasaki Heavy Industries 325 1983 8 2 315 in regular service
  • 1366, 1370 at Randall's Island FDNY Facility
  • Both cars are used as FDNY training cars and are inoperable. Part of 1370 sliced away.
R62A Bombardier Transportation 825 1984 1 0 822 in regular service (2 in work service)
  • 1906, 1907 as Garbage cars
R65[63] Kawasaki Heavy Industries 3 1989 0 0 3 in work service
  • PC01–PC03 as Pump cars
R68 Westinghouse-Amrail: Westinghouse, ANF Industrie, Jeumont-Schneider, Alstom 425 1986 0 0 425 in regular service
R68A Kawasaki Heavy Industries 200 1988 0 0 200 in regular service
R127[64] Kawasaki Heavy Industries 10 1990 0 0 10 in work service
  • EP001–EP010 as Garbage cars, Signal Dolly cars
R134 Kawasaki Heavy Industries 8 1994 0 0 8 in work service
  • EP011–EP018 as Garbage cars, Signal Dolly cars

Miscellaneous[edit]

The Train of Many Colors in 2008, during the last game at Shea Stadium in Queens
The "Train of Many Colors" makes another appearance on the 7 train in 2008, commemorating the last game at Shea Stadium
  • Air conditioning is standard on all cars R42 and later. R38s 4140–4149 and R40s 4350–4549 were also delivered with A/C, and all cars not equipped with A/C from classes R26-R40 (with the exception of the R27, R30, and R33S) were later retrofitted with A/C. All active cars are equipped with air conditioning and cars with malfunctioning air conditioning are not supposed to be put into service.[65]
  • During World War II, a group of old New York elevated line cars dating from the late 19th century was sent west to the San Francisco Bay Area by the United States Maritime Commission for use by the Shipyard Railway, a temporary wartime electric line transporting workers to the Kaiser Shipyards. After the war, most were sold to be used as units in a local motel, but their whereabouts afterwards is unknown. Two of them however were acquired and have been restored by the Western Railway Museum in Rio Vista, California.[66]
  • There are many examples of rolling stock built under contract which are not intended for revenue service, such as the R95 money train, R65 pump train, R127/R134 garbage train and R156 work locomotive.[67]
  • The table below shows what year the TA had expected to retire several car models in 1981.[68]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ See:
    • Korman, Joe (December 4, 2017). "IRT Car Assignments". JoeKorNer.
    • Korman, Joe (January 12, 2018). "BMT-IND Car Assignments". JoeKorNer.
  2. ^ Redbirds are R26, R28, R29, R33, and R36. All of these cars were replaced by more modern subway trains (R142/R142As) between 2000 and 2003, though many R33 cars are still in use as work trains. Sometimes the term "Redbird" would also be used on the R27 and R30 cars as they were repainted Gunn red during the late 1980s and early 1990s before their retirement in 1993. These were known as the BMT Redbirds. Sixteen R17s were also given this paint scheme in 1985/86, but were retired by 1988, well before the name "Redbird" caught on.
  3. ^ All A Division cars are 51 feet (15.5 m) long; B Division cars are 60 feet (18.3 m) or 75 feet (22.9 m).
  4. ^ Car number series selected to bracket pre-unification BMT number series (1853–2999). Renumbered to 2950–2999 in 1970
  5. ^ Car number series to continue from pre-unification IRT number series (5702).
  6. ^ Some R32s are still in service.
  7. ^ The New York City Subway R44s were retired in 2010. The Staten Island Railway R44s are still in service.

References[edit]

  1. ^ more photos at http://www.nycsubway.org/wiki/R-137_Vacuum_Train
  2. ^ "New York City Subway Car Fleet Jan 2012 through January 2016". TheJoeKorner. Retrieved February 6, 2016.
  3. ^ "Showing Image 59931". www.nycsubway.org.
  4. ^ "Showing Image 59998". www.nycsubway.org.
  5. ^ Kennedy, Randy (August 22, 2001). "End of Line for Subway Cars: The Ocean Floor". New York Times. Retrieved February 6, 2016.
  6. ^ Urbina, Ian (April 8, 2008). "Growing Pains for a Deep-Sea Home Built of Subway Cars". New York Times. Retrieved February 6, 2016.
  7. ^ Parke, Phoebe (February 26, 2015). "Dumping subway trains into the ocean ... in a good way". CNN. Retrieved February 6, 2016.
  8. ^ "For Subway Cars, the Final Trip". New York Times. May 15, 2011. Retrieved February 6, 2016.
  9. ^ "Subdivision 'B' Car Assignments: Cars Required April 27, 2020" (PDF). The Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association. 63 (6): 14. June 2020. Retrieved June 1, 2020.
  10. ^ "Subway Derailment In Harlem Caused By 'Human Error,' MTA Says". Retrieved June 18, 2019.
  11. ^ "Subdivision 'A' Car Assignments: Cars Required April 27, 2020" (PDF). The Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association. 63 (6): 14. June 2020. Retrieved June 1, 2020.
  12. ^ "Subdivision 'A' Car Assignments: Cars Required April 27, 2020" (PDF). The Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association. 63 (6): 14. June 2020. Retrieved June 1, 2020.
  13. ^ Barron, James (November 21, 1997). "87 Are Hurt as Subway Train Runs Into Another in Queens". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved July 26, 2017.
  14. ^ "Subdivision 'B' Car Assignments: Cars Required April 27, 2020" (PDF). The Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association. 63 (6): 14. June 2020. Retrieved June 1, 2020.
  15. ^ "Subdivision 'B' Car Assignments: Cars Required April 27, 2020" (PDF). The Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association. 63 (6): 14. June 2020. Retrieved June 1, 2020.
  16. ^ a b c "Capital Program Oversight Committee Meeting" (PDF). Metropolitan Transportation Authority. January 2019. Retrieved January 18, 2019.
  17. ^ "Subdivision 'A' Car Assignments: Cars Required April 27, 2020" (PDF). The Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association. 63 (6): 14. June 2020. Retrieved June 1, 2020.
  18. ^ Dan Rivoli [@danrivoli] (March 27, 2020). "The aftermath of the fatal subway fire" (Tweet). Retrieved March 27, 2020 – via Twitter.
  19. ^ Jose Martinez [@JMartinezNYC] (March 27, 2020). "Photos obtained by @THECITYNY of this morning's fatal subway fire at the Central Park North-110th Street station the level of destruction" (Tweet). Retrieved March 28, 2020 – via Twitter.
  20. ^ "Subdivision 'A' Car Assignments: Cars Required April 27, 2020" (PDF). The Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association. 63 (6): 14. June 2020. Retrieved June 1, 2020.
  21. ^ a b http://i42.tinypic.com/r2oqb8.jpg
  22. ^ "Subdivision 'B' Car Assignments: Cars Required April 27, 2020" (PDF). The Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association. 63 (6): 14. June 2020. Retrieved June 1, 2020.
  23. ^ "Capital Program Oversight Committee Meeting July 2017" (PDF). Metropolitan Transportation Authority. July 24, 2017. p. 18. Retrieved October 28, 2017.
  24. ^ "Subdivision 'B' Car Assignments: Cars Required April 27, 2020" (PDF). The Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association. 63 (6): 14. June 2020. Retrieved June 1, 2020.
  25. ^ "Subdivision 'B' Car Assignments: Cars Required April 27, 2020" (PDF). The Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association. 63 (6): 14. June 2020. Retrieved June 1, 2020.
  26. ^ "New York City Transit and Bus Committee Meeting October 2018" (PDF). mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. October 19, 2018. pp. 188–189. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 20, 2018. Retrieved October 20, 2018.
  27. ^ "Subdivision 'B' Car Assignments: Cars Required April 27, 2020" (PDF). The Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association. 63 (6): 14. June 2020. Retrieved June 1, 2020.
  28. ^ "MTA Pulls Subway Car Fleet Out of Service — Days Before NYC Reopens". NBC New York. Retrieved June 3, 2020.
  29. ^ "Subdivision 'A' Car Assignments: Cars Required April 27, 2020" (PDF). The Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association. 63 (6): 14. June 2020. Retrieved June 1, 2020.
  30. ^ "Page 32 (Footnotes)" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on March 5, 2009. Retrieved February 16, 2009.
  31. ^ "New Vacuum Trains Aim to Suck Trash Right in its Tracks". www.ny1.com.
  32. ^ Levine, Richard (February 13, 1987). "A SUBWAY WALKER SEARCHES THE LABYRINTH FOR PROBLEMS". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved April 3, 2017.
  33. ^ "www.nycsubway.org: Track Geometry and Inspection Cars". www.nycsubway.org. Retrieved April 3, 2017.
  34. ^ a b Kennedy, Randy (February 19, 2004). Subwayland: Adventures in the World Beneath New York. Macmillan. ISBN 9780312324346.
  35. ^ Track Safety Standards Compliance Manual. Federal Railroad Administration, 2009. Print, Web. Track Safety Standards Compliance Manual Archived July 2, 2009, at the Wayback Machine
  36. ^ Uzarski, Dr. Don. CEE 409 - Railroad Track Engineering, Class Notes. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2009. Print.
  37. ^ "MTA | news | New York City Transit's Wonder Train Car!". www.mta.info. Retrieved April 3, 2017.
  38. ^ Adam Clark Estes. "This Superheroic Train Keeps New York City's Subway Safe". Gizmodo. Gawker Media.
  39. ^ "MTA Capital Program Oversight Committee Meeting: January 2016" (PDF). mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. January 2016. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 29, 2016. Retrieved January 23, 2016.
  40. ^ "Showing Image 5292". nycsubway.org.
  41. ^ "Showing Image 12845". nycsubway.org.
  42. ^ "Roster Summary By Type". Retrieved August 25, 2009.
  43. ^ "IRT ELEVATED CARS". www.thejoekorner.com.
  44. ^ "www.nycsubway.org: Chapter 1, The Elevated Lines". www.nycsubway.org.
  45. ^ http://www.bera.org/cgi-bin/pnaerc.pl?sel_owner_now=Branford+Electric+Railway+Association
  46. ^ http://www.bera.org/cgi-bin/pnaerc.pl?sel_owner_once=Western+Railway+Museum
  47. ^ "BMT ELEVATED CARS". www.thejoekorner.com.
  48. ^ http://www.bera.org/cgi-bin/pnaerc.pl?sel_owner_once=Seashore+Trolley+Museum
  49. ^ http://www.bera.org/cgi-bin/pnaerc.pl?sel_owner_once=New+York+City+Transit+Authority
  50. ^ http://www.bera.org/cgi-bin/pnaerc.pl?sel_owner_now=Trolley+Museum+of+New+York
  51. ^ "Showing Image 26329". www.nycsubway.org.
  52. ^ "Showing Image 128112". www.nycsubway.org.
  53. ^ Breese, Robert. "55 PLUS: Expertise at work carries over into personal life". Times Herald-Record.
  54. ^ "NYC Subway Car 983 – Craggy Mountain Line".
  55. ^ "www.nycsubway.org: R-123 Continuous Welded Rail Cars". www.nycsubway.org.
  56. ^ "www.nycsubway.org: R-71 Reach Cars". www.nycsubway.org.
  57. ^ "www.nycsubway.org: R-71 Rider Cars". www.nycsubway.org.
  58. ^ "www.nycsubway.org: Track Maintenance - Rail Adhesion Train". www.nycsubway.org.
  59. ^ "www.nycsubway.org: R-161 Rider Cars". www.nycsubway.org.
  60. ^ Walsh, Kevin (August 17, 2017). "REDBIRDS OF HUNT'S POINT". Forgotten New York.
  61. ^ Pm, 2008 at 10:55 (October 30, 2008). "OUR LOCATION".
  62. ^ Rivoli, Dan. "MTA to add more space on L line by retrofitting train cars with fold-up seats". nydailynews.com.
  63. ^ "www.nycsubway.org: R-65 Pump Cars". www.nycsubway.org.
  64. ^ "www.nycsubway.org: R-127 -- R-134 Rubbish Motors". www.nycsubway.org.
  65. ^ Jaffe, Eric (August 15, 2012). "A Brief History of Air-Conditioning on the New York Subway". The Atlantic Cities. Retrieved August 15, 2012.
  66. ^ "Richmond Shipyard Railway 1943–1945" Retrieved on April 16, 2008 Archived July 21, 2006, at the Wayback Machine
  67. ^ "www.nycsubway.org". www.nycsubway.org.
  68. ^ "www.nycsubway.org". www.nycsubway.org.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]