New York Genome Center

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About the New York Genome Center[edit]

The New York Genome Center (NYGC) is an independent nonprofit at the forefront of transforming biomedical research and clinical care with the mission of saving lives. NYGC is one of the five largest genome centers in the world today, and a vital resource in the advancement of translational genomics.

Comprised of renowned academic, medical and industry leaders across the globe, NYGC focuses on translating genomic research into clinical solutions for serious diseases. Its member organizations and partners are united in this unprecedented collaboration of technology, science and medicine. NYGC harnesses the power of innovation and discoveries to improve people’s lives — ethically, equitably, and urgently.

Member institutions include: Albert Einstein College of Medicine, American Museum of Natural History, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Columbia University, Cornell University/Weill Cornell Medicine, Hospital for Special Surgery, The Jackson Laboratory, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, The New York Stem Cell Foundation, New York University, Northwell Health (formerly North Shore-LIJ), Princeton University, The Rockefeller University, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Stony Brook University and IBM.

The New York Genome Center’s headquarters is located at 101 Avenue of the Americas (101AOA) just north of Canal Street, where the SoHo, Tribeca and Hudson Square neighborhoods meet.

The facility serves as a state-of-the-art hub for genome sequencing, analytics, bioinformatics, high-performance computing and research.[1][2][3]

New York Genome Center
Nygenomelogo-color300px.png
Established 2011 (2011)
Research type clinical research and translational research
Field of research
Genomics, Bioinformatics, DNA sequencing, Genome sequencing
Director Robert B. Darnell
Staff 180
Location New York City, New York
Affiliations Albert Einstein College of Medicine
American Museum of Natural History
Association for a Better New York
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
Columbia University
Cornell University/Weill Cornell Medicine
Hospital for Special Surgery
IBM
The Jackson Laboratory
Manhattan Chamber of Commerce
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
Mount Sinai School of Medicine
New York Bio
NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital
The New York Stem Cell Foundation
New York University
Northwell Health (Formerly North Shore-LIJ)
The Rockefeller University
Roswell Park Cancer Institute
Stony Brook
Website www.nygenome.org

Leadership[edit]

Robert B. Darnell, MD, PhD; Founding Director & CEO[4][5]

Cheryl A. Moore; President & COO[6][7]

Institutional Founding Members[edit]

Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Columbia University

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

New York-Presbyterian

NYU School of Medicine

Stony Brook University

Northwell Health (Formerly North Shore-LIJ)

The Jackson Laboratory

The Rockefeller University

Weill Cornell Medicine

Founding Technology Member[edit]

IBM

Associate Members[edit]

American Museum Natural History

Hospital for Special Surgery

Princeton University

Roswell Park Cancer Institute

The New York Stem Cell Foundation

Funding[edit]

In January 2016, NYGC received a generous philanthropic gift presented as a challenge grant from the foundations of two of its board members. The Simons Foundation[8] and The Carson Family Charitable Trust[9] will match every dollar raised up to $100 million; at the end of a successful challenge, dollars raised will total $200 million.[10][11][12][13]

In the winter of 2016, NYGC was awarded $40 million, over four years, from the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), a division of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), to create a Center for Common Disease Genomics (CCDG), which will establish a collaborative large-scale genome sequencing program. CCDG will use genome sequencing to explore the genomic contributions to common diseases such as autism, heart disease, diabetes, and stroke. The NHGRI’s CCDG Program funds four of the top genome centers in the country, of which NYGC is one. NYGC in particular will focus on autism and has the potential for funding to study additional diseases such as asthma and Alzheimer’s disease. The autism study will include researchers from NYGC, Washington University, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Columbia and UCLA.[14][15][16][17]

In the fall of 2015, NYGC was awarded $13.5 million[18] from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), Whole Genome Sequencing, and Omics Project for the Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program; funding will be used for large-scale whole genome sequencing at NYGC.[19]

Collaborations[edit]

IBM and New York Genome Center to Create Comprehensive, Open Cancer Data Repository to Tap Cognitive Insights from Watson

At the White House Precision Medicine Initiative Summit, NYGC and IBM announced a collaboration to create a comprehensive and open repository of genetic data to accelerate cancer research and scale access to precision medicine using cognitive insights from IBM Watson. Analyzing this data alongside the medical community’s growing knowledge about cancer could help accelerate the ability of doctors to deliver personalized treatment to individual patients. IBM and NYGC are working together to build the capacity to house the contributed data, train Watson’s cognitive computing capabilities for genomic analysis and enable the Center’s member institutions and other research collaborators to sequence and analyze DNA and RNA from patients’ tumors.[20][21][22][23][24][25][26]

Awards[edit]

NYGC was honored with the Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Health Sciences Advisory Council Award[27] for Distinguished Service in the fall. This award is given to individuals and organizations who have shown a strong and committed interest in health sciences and whose influence and reputation have made a significant impact on the public concerning healthcare.

Facility:[28][edit]

The New York Genome Center’s headquarters is located at 101 Avenue of the Americas (101AOA) just north of Canal Street, where the SoHo, Tribeca and Hudson Square neighborhoods meet.

Our facility serves as a state-of-the-art hub for genome sequencing, analytics, bioinformatics, high-performance computing and research. Through our Integrated Genomic Solution, NYGC connects, services and collaborates with academic, research and medical institutions, as well as pharmaceutical, biotech and IT companies.

The space is designed with an emphasis on spatial flexibility and collaboration. Labs are furnished almost entirely with mobile, height-adjustable lab benches that allow easy reconfiguration as new methods, techniques or research directions demand it. The office areas feature open workstations, a variety of inviting, media-supported meeting spaces, a locally managed employee café, a roof garden and “communicating” staircases between floors to encourage collaboration among our staff and partners throughout the facility. Expansion space in the building allows NYGC to add scientific equipment and staff as we grow.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "IBM and New York Genome Center's new cancer tumor repository aims to revolutionize treatment". Washington Post. Retrieved 2016-06-01. 
  2. ^ "About Us". New York Genome. Retrieved 2016-06-01. 
  3. ^ "IBM Collaborates with 14 Cancer Institutes to Decipher Genomic Data". GenomeWeb. Retrieved 2016-06-01. 
  4. ^ "About Us". New York Genome. Retrieved 2016-06-01. 
  5. ^ "A New 'Manhattan Project': New York Genome Center". www.medpagetoday.com. 2016-03-09. Retrieved 2016-06-01. 
  6. ^ "About Us". New York Genome. Retrieved 2016-06-01. 
  7. ^ "Cheryl A. Moore Joins the New York Genome Center" (PDF). 
  8. ^ "The Chronicle of Philanthropy". 
  9. ^ "Healthcare Finance News". 
  10. ^ "The Chronicle of Philanthropy". 
  11. ^ "Philanthropy News Digest". 
  12. ^ "GenomeWeb". 
  13. ^ "Crains New York". 
  14. ^ "The New York Genome Center Awarded $40 Million from the NIH to Use Genomic Sequencing to Explore Common Disease". Retrieved 2016-07-20. 
  15. ^ "IB Times". 
  16. ^ "The New York Genome Center Awarded $40 Million from the NIH to Use Genomic Sequencing to Explore Common Disease - Washington Business Journal". Washington Business Journal. Retrieved 2016-07-20. 
  17. ^ "The New York Genome Center Awarded $40 Million from the NIH to Use Genomic Sequencing to Explore Common Disease - New York Business Journal". New York Business Journal. Retrieved 2016-07-20. 
  18. ^ "Genome Web". 
  19. ^ "NY Genome Center Wins $13.5M from NHLBI Precision Medicine Program". Retrieved 2016-07-20. 
  20. ^ "IBM and New York Genome Center's new cancer tumor repository aims to revolutionize treatment". Washington Post. Retrieved 2016-07-20. 
  21. ^ "IBM, NYGC Expand Partnership With New Pilot Cancer Study". Retrieved 2016-07-20. 
  22. ^ IBM. "IBM Invests in Modernizing Medicine to Accelerate Adoption of Watson Technologies in Healthcare". www.prnewswire.com. Retrieved 2016-07-20. 
  23. ^ "New IBM Watson incarnation crunches academic literature". Washington Post. Retrieved 2016-07-20. 
  24. ^ "IBM's Watson Tackles The Tumor Genome, On The Way To Personalized Cancer Treatments". 2014-03-19. Retrieved 2016-07-20. 
  25. ^ "Could Watson soon be a cancer specialist? IBM and New York Genome center partner on brain cancer treatment". Washington Post. Retrieved 2016-07-20. 
  26. ^ Herper, Matthew. "IBM's Watson Attempts To Tackle The Genetics Of Brain Cancer". Retrieved 2016-07-20. 
  27. ^ "New York Genome Center is Honored by Columbia University Medical Center and NewYork-Presbyterian Health Sciences Advisory Council - New York Genome". Retrieved 2016-07-20. 
  28. ^ "Our Facility". New York Genome. Retrieved 2016-06-01. 

External links[edit]