New York Legal Assistance Group

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New York Legal Assistance Group
Abbreviation NYLAG
Motto Justice for All
Founded 1990
Legal status 501(c)(3)
Purpose NYLAG Provides free civil legal services to low-income New Yorkers.
Headquarters New York City
Website http://www.nylag.org

The New York Legal Assistance Group (NYLAG) is a non-profit organization that provides free civil legal services to low-income New Yorkers. Its services include direct representation, case consultation, advocacy, community education, training, financial counseling, and impact litigation.

Approach[edit]

NYLAG is able to provide services to undocumented immigrants, and individuals and families who earn above the government-designated poverty threshold because the agency does not accept Federal Legal Services Corporation funding. In the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014, NYLAG had a budget of $23 million, supplemented by partnerships with law firms and volunteers that donated over 100,000 hours in pro bono services, valued at over $17 million.[1] On average, NYLAG provides services at an internal cost of $200 per client. In 2014, the agency served over 75,000 clients - over fifty per cent of whom were immigrants.

NYLAG has 125 community offices located in courts, hospitals, and community- based organizations in all five boroughs of New York City, Long Island and Westchester and Rockland Counties. The agency partners with 600 health and human services agencies, and provides cross-referrals. [2]

The agency has a paid staff of 250 (as of April, 2015) and uses the services of approximately 1,200 pro bono attorneys and other volunteers.

Populations Served[3] Immigrants Children with special needs Victims of domestic violence Veterans Elderly Holocaust survivors Disabled Tenants Homeowners Victims of natural disasters Serious or chronically ill patients Consumers

In 2008, NYLAG filed a class action lawsuit with the Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund, suing the United States government for delays in the processing of Immigration Applications.[4]