New York State Hospital Commission

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The New York State Hospital Commission is a subdivision of the New York State Department of Health. It was called the State Commission in Lunacy from 1895 to 1912.

History[edit]

In 1894 New York State adopted the New York State Constitution. It took effect on January 1, 1895. It created a State Commission in Lunacy having "exclusive jurisdiction over all institutions for the care and treatment of the insane, epileptics and idiots". By the provisions of chapter 121 of the Laws of 1912, the State Commission in Lunacy was designated the State Hospital Commission. The Commission consisted of three commissioners appointed by the Governor of New York for terms of six years, with the exception of New York State Medical Commissioner, who served based on his "good behavior". Every private institution for the insane had to be issued a license from the commission. By chapter 32 of the Laws of 1909, the Commission was given supervision over the expenditures of all New York State hospitals for the insane: "no disbursements for any purpose can be made by these institutions except upon quarterly estimates, which must be submitted to the Commission for revision and approval. All vouchers for the maintenance and building improvements account of the State hospitals are paid through the office of the Commission." There was also a Bureau of Deportation which acted under the direction of the Commission to return nonresident insane persons to their place of origin.[1]

Bureaus[edit]

Members[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ New York State Hospital Commission. 1916. By the adoption in 1894 of the new Constitution, which took effect on January 1, 1895, the State Commission in Lunacy became a constitutional body, vested with exclusive jurisdiction over all institutions for the care and treatment of the insane, epileptics and idiots expressly excepted. The Legislature. is empowered to confer additional powers and duties upon the Commission, but all laws existing at the date of the adoption of the Constitution, so far as they do not conflict with its provisions, are preserved. By the provisions of chapter 121 of the Laws of 1912, the State Commission in Lunacy is designated the State Hospital Commission. The Commission consists of three members appointed by the Governor (by and with the consent of the Senate) for terms of six years, with the exception of Medical Commissioner, who serves during good behavior. No private institution for the insane can lawfully exist without a license from the Commission. By chapter 32 of the Laws of 1909, the Commission is given supervision over the expenditures of all State hospitals for the insane; no disbursements for any purpose can be made by these institutions except upon quarterly estimates, which must be submitted to the Commission for revision and approval. All vouchers for the maintenance and building improvements account of the State hospitals are paid through the office of the Commission. There is also a New York State Bureau of Deportation which acts under the direction of the Commission in securing the return to other countries and states of alien and nonresident insane persons who have not obtained a legal residence in New York ... 
  2. ^ Dowbiggin, Ian (1997). Keeping America Sane. New York: Cornell University Press. pp. 49, 56, 212. ISBN 978-0801483981. 
  3. ^ a b Sanger, William; Bissell, Herbert; May, James (1913). State of New York, State Hospital Commission, Twenty-fourth Annual Report, October 1, 1911 to September 30, 1912. Albany, New York: J. B. Lyon Company. p. 44. 
  4. ^ "Lunacy Board's Powers. Managers Can Make No Expenditures Without Its Consent. President MacDonald of the State Commission Ridicules the Idea, that the Patronage of the Hospitals for the Insane Will Go to Politicians". New York Times. May 15, 1896. Retrieved 2015-04-22. Dr. Carlos F. MacDonald, President of the State Commission in Lunacy, yesterday ridiculed the notion that the patronage of the State hospitals for the insane would be transferred to politicians through the operation of the Horton act, which was signed by Gov. Morton on Wednesday. ... 
  5. ^ "Andrew D. Morgan". The New York red book. 1916. Andrew D. Morgan, Member of the State Hospital Commission, is a lifelong resident of Ilion, Herkimer county, N. Y., and is a former postmaster, and leading merchant of that village. Mr. Morgan is a member of the Herkimer County Bar and has served as president of the village of Ilion. Mr. Morgan is married, and is about forty-eight years of age. 
  6. ^ "Col. Sanger Resigns Office. Leaves State Hospital Commission on Account of His Health". New York Times. January 4, 1913. Retrieved 2015-04-22.