New York State Route 910D

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NYS Route 910D marker

NYS Route 910D
Washington Avenue Extension
Route information
Maintained by NYSDOT
Length: 2.91 mi[2] (4.68 km)
Existed: By 1973[1] – present
Major junctions
West end: NY 155 / CR 157 in Albany
East end: CR 156 in Albany
Location
Counties: Albany
Highway system

New York State Route 910D (NY 910D) is an unsigned reference route designation for Washington Avenue Extension, a divided highway extension of Washington Avenue in Albany, New York, in the United States. The state-maintained portion of the highway begins at an intersection with NY 155 (here county-maintained as County Route 157 or CR 157) and ends at CR 156 (Fuller Road). Past Fuller Road, the highway is maintained by the city of Albany and known as Washington Avenue. Washington Avenue Extension was constructed in the late 1960s and open to traffic by 1973.

Route description[edit]

Washington Avenue Extension (unsigned NY 910D) begins at an intersection with NY 155 (here county-maintained as CR 157) near the western Albany city line. The highway heads southeastward as a four-lane divided highway, paralleling the routing of nearby Interstate 90 (I-90) to New York State Thruway exit 24. This portion of Washington Avenue Extension is flanked on both sides by named Frontage Roads, both of which begin at NY 155. The northern road ends prior to Rapp Road while the southern road ends just short of Crossgates Mall.

At exit 24, Washington Avenue Extension dips southward to serve Crossgates Mall and avoid exit 1 on the Adirondack Northway (I-87) and the Northside Route (I-90). Past the interchange, the road returns northeastward and follows I-90 east to CR 156 (Fuller Road). At this junction, state jurisdiction of Washington Avenue ends and Washington Avenue continues into downtown Albany as a city street. This section of Washington Avenue connects to the University at Albany uptown campus, the W. Averill Harriman State Office Complex, and NY 85.

While the speed limit is 55 miles per hour (89 km/h) until the final 0.5-mile (0.8 km) stretch approaching Fuller Road (which is a frequently-disobeyed 45 mph), the route is controlled by traffic signals at every intersection, save the interchange for Crossgates Mall, a grade-separated interchange. This causes traffic to flow at speeds up to 25 miles per hour (40 km/h) below the limit during peak hours. At Crossgates, Washington Avenue Extension curves southward around the exit 1 interchange of I-90 and the Northway, curving northward afterward to resume it original course, as the speed limit drops to 45 miles per hour (72 km/h).

History[edit]

When the New York State Thruway was constructed near Albany in the early 1950s, exit 24 on the highway initially connected to Washington Avenue, a city street leading into downtown Albany.[3][4] In the mid-1960s, the portion of Washington Avenue from the Thruway to Fuller Road was dismantled as part of the construction of the Northside Route; that is, the modern routing of I-90 through downtown Albany. At the same time, construction began on a new divided highway routing for Washington Avenue between Fuller Road and NY 155 along the southern edge of I-90.[5][6][7] The highway, named Washington Avenue Extension, was completed by 1973[1] and designated as NY 910D, an unsigned reference route.[8]

As of May 2012, major reconstruction work is well underway to realign Washington Avenue Extension to the north of the CSNE UAlbany Nanotech College complex. The current signalized intersection will be replaced with a two-lane roundabout with an overpass carrying Washington Avenue through traffic.[9]

Major intersections[edit]

The entire route is in Albany, Albany County.

Mile[2] km Destinations Notes
0.00 0.00 NY 155 / CR 157 (Karner Road)
2.03 3.27 Crossgates Mall Road Interchange; to Crossgates Commons
2.91 4.68 CR 156 (Fuller Road) to I-87 / I-90 west / NY Thruway Access to I-90 east via Washington Avenue east
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Sunoco (1973). New York (Map). Cartography by H.M. Gousha Company (1973 ed.).
  2. ^ a b "2008 Traffic Data Report for New York State" (PDF). New York State Department of Transportation. June 16, 2009. p. 341. Retrieved January 10, 2010. 
  3. ^ Sunoco (1952). New York (Map). Cartography by Rand McNally and Company.
  4. ^ Esso (1954). New York with Special Maps of Putnam–Rockland–Westchester Counties and Finger Lakes Region (Map). Cartography by General Drafting (1955–56 ed.).
  5. ^ Sinclair (1964). New York and Metropolitan New York (Map). Cartography by Rand McNally and Company.
  6. ^ Esso (1968). New York (Map). Cartography by General Drafting (1969–70 ed.).
  7. ^ New York State Legislature. "New York State Highway Law § 349-e". Retrieved June 19, 2009. 
  8. ^ New York State Department of Transportation (October 2004). Official Description of Highway Touring Routes, Scenic Byways, & Bicycle Routes in New York State (PDF). Retrieved June 19, 2009. 
  9. ^ Albany County Department of Public Works. "County Route 156 Fuller Road Reconstruction Project". Retrieved June 19, 2009.