New York University Grossman School of Medicine

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NYU Grossman School of Medicine
New York University School of Medicine Shield.png
TypePrivate
Established1841; 180 years ago (1841)
Parent institution
New York University
DeanRobert I. Grossman
Students657 MD students[1]
242 PhD students[1]
68 MD/PhD students[1]
Location, ,
40°44′31″N 73°58′28″W / 40.74205°N 73.97444°W / 40.74205; -73.97444Coordinates: 40°44′31″N 73°58′28″W / 40.74205°N 73.97444°W / 40.74205; -73.97444
CampusUrban
ColorsViolet and white    
Websitemed.nyu.edu

New York University Grossman School of Medicine founded in 1841, is the medical school of New York University.[2]

NYU Grossman School of Medicine is part of NYU Langone Health, named after Kenneth Langone, the investment banker and financial backer of The Home Depot.[3] NYU Langone Health is home to the NYU Grossman School of Medicine and the Vicek Institute of Graduate Biomedical Sciences.

In August 2018, the School of Medicine announced it would be offering full-tuition scholarships to all current and future students in its MD degree program

Medical education[edit]

New York University School of Medicine implemented the curriculum for the 21st century, consisting of 18 months of basic science and two and a half years of clinical training. Students take the USMLE Step 1 exam after the clerkship year (with the exception of MD/PhD students, who take it before starting their PhD work). This allows students additional time to take electives, conduct research, or go on away rotations. Other features of the curriculum include NYU3T (a joint program with the New York University College of Nursing) and PLACE (Patient-Based Longitudinal Ambulatory Care Experience).

The NYU School of Medicine also offers several 5-year joint degree programs, some of which can be optionally completed in 4 years:[4]

Since 1964, NYU School of Medicine has offered MD/PhD dual degree training through the Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP).

In 2010, the NYU School of Medicine introduced a 3-year MD program based on the program first pioneered in Canada at McMaster University Medical School in 1965.[5] The 3-year program can only be applied to by students accepted into the 4 year stream. 3-year program students are guaranteed a residency placement in their specialty of choice at NYU Langone Medical Center.[5] They complete their preclinical training at the same time as 4 year students, however they start clinical rotations 6 weeks earlier and also spend the summer after their first year doing a summer fellowship in the department of their specialty of choice.[5]

Facilities[edit]

In 2011 NYU Grossman School of Medicine opened an emergency simulation center at NYC Health + Hospitals/Bellevue in a joint effort with the City University of New York.[6] The New York Simulation Center for the Health Sciences provides training for emergency personnel[7]

Research facilities include the Vilcek Institute of Graduate Biomedical Sciences[8] and the Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine.[9]

History[edit]

New York University College of Medicine was established in 1841. The medical school merged with Bellevue Hospital Medical College in 1898 to form the University and Bellevue Hospital Medical College. The name New York Grossman School of Medicine was adopted in 2019.[10]

The NYU School of Medicine is home to many key advancements in medical education. In 1854, human dissection in New York was legalized due to efforts of the faculty. In 1884, the Carnegie Laboratory, the first facility in the U.S. devoted to teaching and research in bacteriology and pathology, was established at NYU. In 1932, the first department of forensic medicine in the U.S. was established at NYU. In 1941, NYU opened the first department of physical medicine and rehabilitation in the U.S. The Institute and Department of Environmental Medicine were established in 1964. In 1980, NYU professor Saul Krugman, M.D., developed the first vaccine against hepatitis B.

In 1866, NYU professors produced a report for the Council of Hygiene and Public Health which led to establishment of New York City's Health Department. The same year, NYU opened the first outpatient clinic in the United States. In 1872, NYU Professor Steven Smith founded the American Public Health Association. In 1899, NYU graduate Walter Reed discovered the mosquito transmission of yellow fever. The 1993 construction of the Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine is the largest building project in history of NYU.

During World War II, NYU College of Medicine was one of 131 colleges and universities nationally that took part in the V-12 Navy College Training Program which offered students a path to a Navy commission.[11]

In 1998, the Mount Sinai-NYU Health System was established when the NYU Medical System merged with Mount Sinai Hospitals. The joint organization included Mount Sinai Hospital, Mount Sinai Hospital of Queens, Tisch Hospital, Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine, Hospital for Joint Diseases Orthopaedic Institute, NYU Downtown Hospital, and Mount Sinai School of Medicine. The merger made NYU the only private university in the country with two medical schools.[12] The union dissolved in 2003 while confronting a shared debt of $665.6 million, but NYU continued to award Mount Sinai's degrees.[13] In 2010, however, the Mount Sinai School of Medicine was accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education and became an independent degree-granting institution without a university affiliation for the first time in its history.[14]

In 2018, NYU Grossman School of Medicine began offering full-tuition scholarships to all current and future students in its MD degree program regardless of need or merit.[15]

Evolution of the NYU Grossman School of Medicine[edit]

  • 1841 - University Medical College organized as the Medical Department of the University of the City of New York
  • 1861 - Bellevue Hospital Medical College Founded
  • 1882 - New York Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital founded (incorporated in 1886)
  • 1896 - Name of the University of the City of New York changed to New York University
  • 1898 - University and Bellevue Hospital Medical College formed by merging of the University Medical College and Bellevue Hospital Medical College
  • 1935 - Name changed to New York University College of Medicine
  • 1945 - Post-graduate Division of New York University College of Medicine established
  • 1948 - New York University Post-Graduate Medical school formed, representing a union of the Postgraduate Division of the College of Medicine and the New York Post-Graduate Medical School
  • 1960 - Name of New York University-Bellevue Medical Center changed to New York University Medical Center - Name of New York University College of Medicine changed to New York University School of Medicine
  • 2008 - New York University Medical Center Hospitals and School of Medicine renamed NYU Langone Medical Center
  • 2020 - New York University School of Medicine renamed New York University Grossman School of Medicine

Timeline of notable events and discoveries[edit]

Smilow Research building
  • 1841: The New York University College of Medicine opens, ten years after the founding of the university. Among the original faculty is John Revere, son of patriot Paul Revere, and Valentine Mott, probably the foremost surgeon of his day.
  • 1854: Human dissection in New York is legalized due to efforts of faculty at the NYU College of Medicine. Also, the first successful resection of a hip joint is performed by Lewis A. Sayre, M.D., the first professor of orthopedic surgery in the United States.
  • 1866: NYU professors of medicine produce a Report for the Council of Hygiene and Public Health. It leads to the establishment of New York City's Health Department.
  • 1867: Established the first clinical professorship devoted to dermatology.[16] Also, the first outpatient clinic in the United States opens at NYU.
  • 1884: The Carnegie Laboratory, the first facility in the United States devoted to teaching and research in bacteriology and pathology, is established at NYU.
  • 1897: Merged with the New York Skin and Cancer Hospital.
  • 1899: Dr. Walter Reed discovers the mosquito transmission of yellow fever at NYU.
  • 1911: The first outpatient cardiac clinic in New York is established by Hubert V. Guile, M.D. at NYU
  • 1932: The first department of forensic medicine in the United States is established at NYU. Also, NYU organizes one of the nation's first interdisciplinary research efforts, the Rheumatic Diseases Study Group, helping to usher in the era of modern rheumatology.
  • 1933: William S. Tillett, M.D. conducts groundbreaking studies of enzymes involved in blood clotting. His work leads to the development of streptokinase, used to combat heart attacks.
  • 1941: The first department of physical medicine and rehabilitation in the United States is established at NYU.
  • 1941-45: During the war years, NYU-trained Julius Axelrod, M.D., works with James Shannon, M.D., and other faculty members in the Medical Schools malaria program. Dr. Axelrod is later awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine.
  • 1947: A site for a new Medical Center, consisting of the NYU School of Medicine, the Post-Graduate Medical School, University (now Tisch) Hospital, and the Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine, is selected. The Institute of Industrial Medicine is established.
  • 1948: University Hospital is created through a merger of the New York Post-Graduate Hospital and New York Skin and Cancer Hospital.
  • 1955: The Medical Science Building and the Henry W. and Albert Berg Institute opens at NYU.
  • 1957: The Hall of Research and Alumni Hall are constructed.
  • 1959: The Nobel Prize for Medicine is awarded to NYU faculty member Severo Ochoa, M.D., for his seminal study of biochemical genetics and nucleic acids.
  • 1960: The Clinical Research Center, funded by the NIH, is established at NYU.
  • 1960s: NYU pathologist Baruj Benacerraf, M.D., conducts pioneering research on genetic regulation of the immune system, for which he is later awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine in 1980.
  • 1963: The new University Hospital opens.
  • 1964: NYU establishes one of the first three Medical Scientist Training Programs (dual MD/PhD graduate programs funded by the NIH) in the United States.
  • 1964: The Institute and Department of Environmental Medicine are established.
  • 1975: One of the first designated national cancer centers is established at NYU, later named the Rita and Stanley H. Kaplan Center.
  • 1981: NYU scientists present the first evidence linking rare cancer, Kaposi's sarcoma, with immune deficiency in a distinct population of homosexual men, a key step in identifying AIDS.
  • 1992: NYU Medical Center opens Women's Health Services under the auspices of the Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Radiology.
  • 1993: The School of Medicine's Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine, the largest building project in history of NYU, is opened as an uncompromising commitment to the advancement and understanding of molecular approaches for the treatment of various important diseases.
  • 1995: The Sir Harold Acton Society is established to recognize donors of $1 million or more.[17][18]
  • 1998: NYU Medical Center is restructured, creating the "NYU Hospitals Center" (including Tisch Hospital and Rusk Institute), the "NYU Health System" (consisting of NYU Hospitals Center, Hospital for Joint Diseases and NYU Downtown Hospital), and the "NYU School of Medicine" which remains an administrative unit of New York University.
  • 2004: The NYU Clinical Cancer Center is opened.
  • 2004: The Nobel Prize for Chemistry is awarded to the distinguished NYU adjunct faculty member Avram Hershko, M.D., for his seminal discovery of the ubiquitin system in protein degradation.
  • 2006: The School of Medicine's Joan and Joel Smilow Research Center is opened to house 4 major programmatic areas: Cancer, Pathology, Dermatology/Cutaneous Biology, and Cardiovascular Biology.
  • 2014: NYU School of Medicine expands into The Alexandria Center of Life Science to host the Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology and the Department of Microbiology, as well as the facilities of Proteomics and Metabolomics.
  • 2019: NYU Grossman School of Medicine's Science Building is opened, encompassing more than 365,000 square feet and 10 floors of laboratory space dedicated to research in the area of Human Genetics, System Biology, Neurobiology, and Medicine.

Institutional Pedigrees[edit]

Institutional Pedigree of the New York University School of Medicine
New York University Medical College founded 1841[19]                
      1898[19] merge   →   University and Bellevue Hospital Medical College   →   1960 name change   →   New York University Medical School
Bellevue Hospital Medical College founded 1861[19]                
Institutional Pedigree of the New York University Hospital
Red Cross Hospital founded 1893[20] 1914 name change[21] Park Hospital    
     
Demilt Dispensary founded 1851[22]   1922 merge[23] created Reconstruction Hospital  →    
         
  Clinic for Functional Re-education founded 1918[24]        
     
Post Graduate Hospital founded 1882[25]   Reconstruction Hospital absorbed into Post Graduate Hospital in 1929[26]    
    1948 merge created University Hospital
New York Skin and Cancer Hospital founded 1883[27]      

Notable people[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "NYU Langone Medical Center Annual Report 2011".
  2. ^ Fein, Esther B. (1998-01-25). "After Earlier Failure, N.Y.U. and Mount Sinai Medical Centers to Merge". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-03-19.
  3. ^ Barron, James (2008-04-16). "N.Y.U. Medical Center Gets Another $100 Million Gift". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-03-19.
  4. ^ Program Information
  5. ^ a b c Cangiarella, Joan; Cohen, Elisabeth; Rivera, Rafael; Gillespie, Colleen; Abramson, Steven (2020). "Evolution of an Accelerated 3-Year Pathway to the MD Degree: The Experience of New York University Grossman School of Medicine". Academic Medicine. 95 (4): 534–539. doi:10.1097/ACM.0000000000003013. ISSN 1040-2446.
  6. ^ Flegenheimer, Matt (2011-09-06). "Using Pretend Patients to Train for Real Crises". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-04-01.
  7. ^ "Emergency Simulation Center Nearly Ready At Bellevue" New York Times Sep 4, 2011
  8. ^ "The Sackler Institute". Retrieved 23 August 2015.
  9. ^ anonymous. "Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine". Retrieved 23 August 2015.
  10. ^ Tullman, Anya. "NYU medical school renamed after Robert Grossman, Penn Medicine alum and former prof". www.thedp.com. Retrieved 2021-03-24.
  11. ^ "Biography of Victor Parsonnet". Heart Rhythm Society. December 23, 1998. Archived from the original on December 10, 2011. Retrieved September 29, 2011.
  12. ^ Fein, Esther B. After Earlier Failure, N.Y.U. and Mount Sinai Medical Centers to Merge." The New York Times, 25 January 1998.
  13. ^ Pérez-Peña, Richard (2003-07-04). "For Hospitals Seeking Split, Debt Is Glue". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-04-15.
  14. ^ MSSM Accreditation Retrieved January 11, 2011
  15. ^ "NYU School of Medicine Offers Full-Tuition Scholarships to All New & Current Medical Students". nyulangone.org.
  16. ^ Shelley, Walter (1 October 1954). "MD". AMA Archives of Dermatology. 70 (4): 411–416. doi:10.1001/archderm.1954.01540220013002.
  17. ^ "The Sir Harold Acton Society."
  18. ^ "Acton Society Adds New Million–Dollar Donors". Global Health Nexus spring 2007. NYU College of Dentistry. Retrieved 23 March 2012.
  19. ^ a b c Friss, Evan (December 6, 2004), "Chronicles: A Look at NYU's Past; Practicing Medicine Through the Years", NYU Today, New York: New York University, Office of Public Affairs, 18 (5), OCLC 37719351
  20. ^ Dock, Lavinia L.; Pickett, Sarah Elizabeth; Noyes, Clara D.; Clement, Fannie F.; Fox, Elizabeth G.; Van Meter, Anna R. (1922), History of American Red Cross Nursing, New York: The Macmillan Company, p. 23, OCLC 1170933.
  21. ^ Dock, et al. (1922) p. 35.
  22. ^ "THE DEMILT DISPENSARY.; Anniversary Celebration", The New York Times, March 27, 1855
  23. ^ "RECONSTRUCTION PLANS TO EXTEND HOSPITAL; $1,500,000 Needed for Expansion and Equipment to Make It Self-Supporting", The New York Times, January 29, 1922
  24. ^ New York State Legislature (1920), "Dispensaries Licensed", New York Legislative Documents, Albany, New York: J.B. Lyon Company, XIX (38): 186
  25. ^ "MENTAL CLINIC AIMS AT WIDER SERVICE; Post-Graduate Hospital Unit Founded by Dr. M.G. Schlapp Marks 47th Anniversary. INDIVIDUAL AID TO PATIENTS Main Purpose Is to Easy Social Burden by Treating Neuroses and Border-Line Cases", The New York Times, November 10, 1929
  26. ^ "Post Graduate Absorbs", Time, Albany, New York: J.B. Lyon Company, XIV (24), December 9, 1929
  27. ^ "First Year's Work Of A Hospital", The New York Times, March 1, 1884

External links[edit]