New Zealand Maritime Museum

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
The museum on the Auckland waterfront.

The New Zealand Maritime Museum is a maritime museum in Auckland, New Zealand. It is located on Hobson Wharf, adjacent to the Viaduct Harbour in central Auckland. It houses exhibitions spanning New Zealand's maritime history, from the first Polynesian explorers and settlers to modern day triumphs at the America's Cup. Its Maori name is 'Te Huiteanaui-A-Tangaroa' - holder of the treasures of Tangaroa (the Sea God).

The museum's founding director was Rodney Wilson, who from 1989 led fundraising efforts to establish the museum, which opened in 1993, the year the America's Cup regatta was held in Auckland.[1][2]

Collections[edit]

The museum cares for a number of collections and permanent exhibitions (as of 2006):[3]

Seaworthy ships[edit]

In addition to a number of reconstructed or preserved ships in the building itself, the museum also owns a number of vessels that are normally berthed outside of the museum:[3]

All except Rapaki can be hired from the museums for sailing excursions or functions. Rapaki can be entered and explored during normal museum visits. Some personnel from the Royal New Zealand Navy are also at times seconded to the museum to assist with maintenance of the ships and exhibition objects.[4]

Extension[edit]

A NZ$8 million extension to the northern end of the museum was built in the late 2000s to house a permanent exhibition, Blue Water, Black Magic, about Sir Peter Blake. It includes the original NZL 32 (Black Magic)..[5][6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Museum pays tribute to former director". Auckland Museum. 30 April 2013. Retrieved 4 January 2016. 
  2. ^ "A Tribute to: T.L.Rodney Wilson CNZM". New Zealand Maritime Museum. Retrieved 4 January 2016. 
  3. ^ a b Collections (from the Museum website, dynamic website links)
  4. ^ Helping out at the New Zealand National Maritime Museum (from the Royal New Zealand Navy website. Retrieved 2007-12-06.)
  5. ^ Trevett, Claire (2 December 2006). "Peter Blake remembered: Raising a glass to fallen sailing hero". The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 30 November 2011. 
  6. ^ "A Tribute to Sir Peter Blake", maritimemuseum.co.nz

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 36°50′30″S 174°45′48″E / 36.841705°S 174.763411°E / -36.841705; 174.763411