New Zealand at the 2018 Winter Olympics

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

New Zealand at the
2018 Winter Olympics
Refer to caption
IOC codeNZL
NOCNew Zealand Olympic Committee
Websitewww.olympics.org.nz
in Pyeongchang, South Korea
9–25 February 2018
Competitors21 in 5 sports
Flag bearer (opening)Beau-James Wells[1]
Flag bearer (closing)Zoi Sadowski-Synnott[2]
Medals
Ranked 26th
Gold
0
Silver
0
Bronze
2
Total
2
Winter Olympics appearances (overview)

New Zealand competed at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea, from 9 to 25 February 2018. The team consisted of 21 athletes, 17 men and 4 women, across five sports.

The team collected two bronze medals, which made these games the most successful Winter Games for New Zealand; the nation had previously collected only one Winter Olympic medal, a silver at the 1992 Games. The two medals also exceeded High Performance Sport New Zealand's target of one medal for the Games.[3]

The two bronze medals were won by Zoi Sadowski-Synnott in the women's snowboarding big air and by Nico Porteous in the men's ski halfpipe. Porteous at 16 years 91 days and Sadowski-Synnott at 16 years 353 days became the nation's two youngest Olympic medallists, breaking the previous record of 17 years 100 days set by Danyon Loader at the 1992 Summer Olympics.[4]

Medallists[edit]

Medal Name Sport Event Date
 Bronze Zoi Sadowski-Synnott Snowboarding Women's big air 22 February
 Bronze Nico Porteous Freestyle skiing Men's halfpipe 22 February

Competitors[edit]

The New Zealand Olympic Committee (NZOC) confirmed a team of 21 athletes, 17 men and 4 women, to compete in five sports. It is the largest delegation New Zealand has sent to the Winter Olympics, surpassing the 18 athletes who were sent to the 2006 Winter Olympics in Torino. The nation participated in the same sports as at the 2014 Winter Olympics.

Sixteen-year-old alpine skier Alice Robinson was New Zealand's youngest competitor;[5] along with fellow 16-year-olds Nico Porteous and Zoi Sadowski-Synnott, the three were the first New Zealand Olympians at either Games to be born in the 21st century. 38-year old speed skater Shane Dobbin was the oldest competitor.

Sport Men Women Total
Alpine skiing 2 1 3
Freestyle skiing 7 2 9
Skeleton 1 0 1
Snowboarding 4 1 5
Speed skating 3 0 3
Total 17 4 21

Alpine skiing[edit]

New Zealand qualified two alpine skiers, one male and one female, through the basic quota. They also received one additional quota.

Athlete Event Run 1 Run 2 Total
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Adam Barwood Men's giant slalom 1:13.41 40 1:13.81 35 2:27.22 34
Men's slalom DNF
Men's super-G N/A 1:31.10 43
Willis Feasey Men's giant slalom 1:14.48 42 1:13.80 34 2:28.28 36
Men's slalom DNF
Men's super-G N/A 1:28.59 37
Alice Robinson Women's giant slalom 1:16.66 37 1:14.53 38 2:31.19 35
Women's slalom DNF

Freestyle skiing[edit]

The NZOC announced the first five freestyle skiers on 24 October 2017,[6] adding another two on 8 November 2017,[7] and a further two on 12 January 2018.[8] Jossi Wells withdrew from participating on 9 January 2018 due to injury.[9]

Halfpipe
Athlete Event Qualification Final
Run 1 Run 2 Best Rank Run 1 Run 2 Run 3 Best Rank
Miguel Porteous Men's halfpipe 40.40 62.60 62.60 17 Did not advance
Nico Porteous 51.20 72.80 72.80 11 Q 82.40 94.80 30.00 94.80 3rd, bronze medalist(s)
Beau-James Wells 86.20 88.20 88.20 5 Q 87.40 52.20 91.60 91.60 4
Byron Wells 88.60 42.00 88.60 4 Q DNS
Britt Hawes Women's halfpipe 52.20 57.40 57.40 21 Did not advance
Janina Kuzma 67.80 48.60 67.80 16 Did not advance
Ski cross
Athlete Event Seeding Round of 16 Quarterfinal Semifinal Final
Time Rank Position Position Position Position Rank
Jamie Prebble Men's ski cross 1:10.48 25 3 Did not advance

Qualification legend: FA – Qualify to medal round; FB – Qualify to consolation round

Slopestyle
Athlete Event Qualification Final
Run 1 Run 2 Best Rank Run 1 Run 2 Run 3 Best Rank
Finn Bilous Men's slopestyle 24.80 85.00 85.00 13 Did not advance
Jackson Wells 52.80 42.00 52.80 25 Did not advance

Skeleton[edit]

New Zealand qualified one male skeleton athlete.[10] The NZOC announced the selection of the racer on 19 January 2018.[11]

Athlete Event Run 1 Run 2 Run 3 Run 4 Total
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Rhys Thornbury Men's 50.90 8 51.03 10 50.65 6 52.14 20 3:24.72 14

Snowboarding[edit]

The NZOC announced the first four snowboarders on 24 October 2017.[6]

Freestyle
Athlete Event Qualification Final
Run 1 Run 2 Best Rank Run 1 Run 2 Run 3 Best Rank
Carlos Garcia Knight Men's big air 88.75 97.50 97.50 1 Q JNS JNS 54.25 54.25 11
Men's slopestyle 80.10 40.20 80.10 2 Q 78.60 52.98 24.35 78.60 5
Rakai Tait Men's halfpipe 36.50 25.75 36.50 26 Did not advance
Zoi Sadowski-Synnott Women's big air 72.75 92.00 92.00 5 Q 65.50 92.00 JNS 157.50 3rd, bronze medalist(s)
Women's slopestyle Cancelled[12] 26.70 48.38 CAN 48.38 13

Tiarn Collins also qualified for the men's slopestyle and big air competitions, but was forced to withdraw after dislocated his shoulder in training prior to the start of the games.[13][14]

Snowboard cross
Athlete Event Seeding 1/8 final Quarterfinal Semifinal Final
Run 1 Run 2 Best Seed
Time Rank Time Rank Position Position Position Position Rank
Duncan Campbell Men's snowboard cross 1:16.68 32 DNF 1:16.68 37 5 Did not advance

Qualification legend: FA – Qualify to medal round; FB – Qualify to consolation round

Speed skating[edit]

Individual
Athlete Event Race
Time Rank
Reyon Kay Men's 1500 m 1:47.81 26
Peter Michael Men's 1500 m 1:46.39 14
Men's 5000 m 6:14.07 4
Mass start
Athlete Event Semifinal Final
Points Time Rank Points Time Rank
Reyon Kay Men's mass start 0 9:17.99 12 Did not advance
Peter Michael 60 7:55.10 1 Q 0 7:49.33 15
Team pursuit
Athlete Event Quarterfinal Semifinal Final
Opposition
Time
Rank Opposition
Time
Rank Opposition
Time
Rank
Shane Dobbin
Reyon Kay
Peter Michael
Men's team pursuit  Norway (NOR)
L 3:41.18
4 Q  South Korea (KOR)
L 3:39.53
2 FB  Netherlands (NED)
L 3:43.54
4

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Opening Ceremony Flagbearers - Olympic Winter Games, PyeongChang 2018" (PDF). olympic.org. International Olympic Committee (IOC). 9 February 2018. Retrieved 10 February 2018.
  2. ^ "NZ Team Recognises Medallists Ahead of Closing Ceremony". New Zealand Olympic Committee. 25 February 2018.
  3. ^ "Strategic Plan 2017-2020" (PDF). High Performance Sport New Zealand. Retrieved 11 February 2018.
  4. ^ Norquay, Kevin (22 February 2018). "2018 Winter Olympics: Meet the high-flying 16-year-olds who made New Zealand proud". Stuff. Retrieved 24 February 2018.
  5. ^ "Alice Robinson to be New Zealand's youngest ever Winter Olympian at age 16". Stuff.
  6. ^ a b "Nico Porteous joins brother in team for Winter Olympics, history beckon". Stuff.co.nz. 24 October 2017. Retrieved 25 October 2017.
  7. ^ "Wells brothers added to Winter Olympics team". Radio New Zealand. 8 November 2017.
  8. ^ "Two more Wells brothers added to NZ Winter Olympics team". Retrieved 16 January 2018 – via TVNZ.
  9. ^ "Jossi Wells withdraws from Winter Olympics team". 9 January 2018. Retrieved 9 January 2018.
  10. ^ "Quota Allocation PyeongChang Olympic Winter Games 2018 - Men's Skeleton - IBSF 14 January 2018" (PDF). www.ibsf.org. International Bobsleigh and Skeleton Federation (IBSF). 15 January 2018. Retrieved 15 January 2018.
  11. ^ "Skeleton racer Rhys Thornbury named in New Zealand Winter Olympics team". www.stuff.co.nz/. Fairfax New Zealand Limited. 15 January 2018. Retrieved 21 January 2018.
  12. ^ "Women's slopestyle qualification canceled". Reuters. 11 February 2018. Retrieved 11 February 2018.
  13. ^ "2018 Winter Olympics: Kiwi snowboarder Tiarn Collins dislocates shoulder on eve". Stuff. Retrieved 12 February 2018.
  14. ^ "Winter Olympics: Kiwi snowboarder Tiarn Collins ruled out of Winter Olympics". 12 February 2018 – via www.nzherald.co.nz.