New Zealand at the 2020 Summer Olympics

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New Zealand at the
2020 Summer Olympics
Flag of New Zealand.svg
IOC codeNZL
NOCNew Zealand Olympic Committee
Websitewww.olympic.org.nz
in Tokyo
July 23, 2021 (2021-07-23) – August 8, 2021 (2021-08-08)
Competitors212 in 21 sports
Flag bearers (opening)Sarah Hirini
David Nyika[2][3]
Flag bearer (closing)Valerie Adams[1]
Medals
Ranked 13th
Gold
7
Silver
6
Bronze
7
Total
20
Summer Olympics appearances (overview)
Other related appearances
 Australasia (1908–1912)

New Zealand competed at the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo. Originally scheduled to take place from 24 July to 9 August 2020, the 2020 Games were postponed to 23 July to 8 August 2021 because of the COVID-19 pandemic.[4] It was the country's twenty-fourth appearance as an independent nation at the Summer Olympics, having made its debut at the 1920 Summer Olympics in Antwerp and competed at every Games since. The New Zealand team consisted of 212 athletes, 112 men and 100 women, across twenty-one sports.

The New Zealand team collected a total of 20 medals, seven gold, six silver and seven bronze, at these Games, surpassing the record of 18 gained at the 2016 Summer Olympics. The seven gold medals collected was second only to the eight medals collected at the 1984 Summer Olympics. Rowing led the sports with five medals, followed by canoeing with three medals, two medals in each of rugby sevens, cycling and athletics, and one medal in each of sailing, golf, boxing, trampolining, tennis and triathlon. It was the first time New Zealand won medals in trampolining (and gymnastics in general) and tennis.

Sprint canoeist Lisa Carrington won gold medals in the women's K-1 200 metres, K-1 500 metres and with Caitlin Regal in the K-2 500 metres to become New Zealand's most successful Olympian with six medals in all, including five gold medals. Rower Emma Twigg claimed the gold medal in the women's single sculls after finishing fourth in the previous two Games.[5] The men's rowing eight claimed the gold medal for the first time since 1972, with Hamish Bond becoming the first New Zealander to win a gold medal at three successive Olympics. Rowing pair Kerri Gowler and Grace Prendergast won the gold medal in the women's pair before helping the women's eight win the silver medal. The women's rugby sevens team beat France 26–12 in the final to claim the gold medal, bettering their silver medal at the 2016 Games.

Medal tables[edit]

Unless otherwise stated, all dates and times are in Japan Standard Time (UTC+9), three hours behind New Zealand Standard Time (UTC+12).

Officials[edit]

Former rower Rob Waddell is the chef de mission for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. He was appointed in December 2012 to lead the Olympic team to the 2016 Rio Olympics and has been confirmed for this role for Tokyo.[6][7]

Competitors[edit]

The following is the list of number of competitors in the Games. Reserves in field hockey, football, and rowing are not counted.

Sport Men Women Total
Athletics 8 5 13
Boxing 1 0 1
Canoeing 3 5 8
Cycling 12 8 19
Diving 1 0 1
Equestrian 5 1 6
Field hockey 16 16 32
Football 22 22 44
Golf 1 1 2
Gymnastics 2 1 3
Karate 0 1 1
Rowing 15 15 30
Rugby sevens 13 13 26
Sailing 7 3 10
Shooting 0 2 2
Surfing 1 1 2
Swimming 2 5 7
Taekwondo 1 0 1
Tennis 2 0 2
Triathlon 2 2 4
Weightlifting 2 3 5
Total 116 104 220

Seventeen-year-old swimmer Erika Fairweather (born 31 December 2003) was New Zealand's youngest competitor, while 51-year-old equestrian showjumper Bruce Goodin (born 10 November 1969) was the oldest competitor. Thirty-three competitors (15.6 percent) were of Māori descent.[8]

Athletics[edit]

New Zealand athletes further achieved the entry standards, either by qualifying time or by world ranking, in the following track and field events (up to a maximum of three athletes in each event):[9][10]

Fifteen track and field athletes were officially named to the New Zealand team on 16 April 2021, with shot putter and triple Olympic medalist Valerie Adams leading them to her historic fifth Games. Notable athletes also featured multiple medallist Nick Willis in the middle-distance running and the reigning Commonwealth Games champion and Rio 2016 bronze medalist Tom Walsh in the men's shot put.[11]

Key
  • Note–Ranks given for track events are within the athlete's heat only
  • Q = Qualified for the next round
  • q = Qualified for the next round as a fastest loser or, in field events, by position without achieving the qualifying target
  • NR = National record
  • N/A = Round not applicable for the event
  • Bye = Athlete not required to compete in round
Track & road events
Athlete Event Heat Semifinal Final
Result Rank Result Rank Result Rank
Sam Tanner Men's 1500 m 3:43.22 9 Did not advance
Nick Willis 3:36.88 7 q 3:35.41 9 Did not advance
Malcolm Hicks Men's marathon 2:23:12 64
Zane Robertson 2:17:04 36
Quentin Rew Men's 50 km walk 3:57:33 16
Camille Buscomb Women's 5000 m 15:24.39 14 Did not advance
Women's 10000 m 32:10.49 20
Field events
Athlete Event Qualification Final
Distance Position Distance Position
Hamish Kerr Men's high jump 2.28 =4 q 2.30 10
Jacko Gill Men's shot put 20.96 9 q 20.71 9
Tom Walsh 21.49 2 Q 22.47 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Valerie Adams Women's shot put 18.83 6 Q 19.62 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Maddi Wesche 18.65 11 q 18.98 6
Lauren Bruce Women's hammer throw 67.71 23 Did not advance
Julia Ratcliffe 73.20 6 q 72.69 9

Boxing[edit]

New Zealand entered one male boxer into the Olympic tournament for the first time since 2004. 2014 and 2018 Commonwealth Games champion David Nyika scored an outright quarterfinal victory to secure a spot in the men's heavyweight division at the 2020 Asia & Oceania Qualification Tournament in Amman, Jordan.[12][13]

Athlete Event Round of 32 Round of 16 Quarterfinals Semifinals Final
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Rank
David Nyika Men's heavyweight Bye  Baalla (MAR)
W 5–0
 Smiahlikau (BLR)
W 5–0
 Gadzhimagomedov (ROC)
L 1–4
Did not advance 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)

Canoeing[edit]

Slalom[edit]

New Zealand canoeists qualified one boat for each of the following classes through the 2019 ICF Canoe Slalom World Championships in La Seu d'Urgell, Spain.[14] Former software engineer Callum Gilbert, with Rio 2016 silver medalist Luuka Jones paddling along her way to fourth straight Olympics, was officially named to the New Zealand's slalom canoeing roster on 12 March 2020.[15]

Athlete Event Preliminary Semifinal Final
Run 1 Rank Run 2 Rank Best Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Callum Gilbert Men's K-1 151.85 23 101.15 20 101.15 23 Did not advance
Luuka Jones Women's C-1 116.55 8 115.19 9 115.19 11 Q 130.39 13 Did not advance
Women's K-1 110.22 10 101.72 3 101.72 3 Q 108.97 5 Q 110.67 6

Sprint[edit]

New Zealand canoeists qualified four boats in each of the following distances for the Games through the 2019 ICF Canoe Sprint World Championships in Szeged, Hungary and the 2020 Oceania Championships in Penrith, New South Wales.[16] Max Brown and Kurtis Imrie were officially named to the New Zealand canoe sprint roster for the Games on 21 April 2021, with the women's kayak squad, led by two-time defending Lisa Carrington, joining them two months later.[17][18]

Athlete Event Heats Quarterfinals Semifinals Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Max Brown
Kurtis Imrie
Men's K-2 1000 m 3:17.210 4 QF 3:10.220 2 SF 3:17.684 2 FA 3:17.267 5
Lisa Carrington Women's K-1 200 m 40.715 1 SF Bye 38.127 OB 1 FA 38:120 OB 1st place, gold medalist(s)
Women's K-1 500 m 1:48.463 1 SF Bye 1:51.680 1 FA 1:51.216 1st place, gold medalist(s)
Caitlin Regal Women's K-1 500 m 1:50.297 3 SF Bye 1:53.495 3 FB 1:53.681 9
Lisa Carrington
'Caitlin Regal
Women's K-2 500 m 1:43.836 1 SF Bye 1:36.724 OB 1 FA 1:35.785 OB 1st place, gold medalist(s)
Teneale Hatton
Alicia Hoskin
1:49.832 4 QF 1:50.507 4 SF 1:44.119 8 FB 1:41.121 14
Lisa Carrington
Teneale Hatton
Alicia Hoskin
Caitlin Regal
Women's K-4 500 m 1:33.959 2 SF Bye 1:36.293 2 FA 1:37.168 4

Qualification Legend: FA = Qualify to final (medal); FB = Qualify to final B (non-medal)

Cycling[edit]

Road[edit]

New Zealand entered two riders to compete in the men's Olympic road race, by virtue of their top 50 national finish (for men) in the UCI World Ranking.[19] The road cycling team was officially named to the New Zealand roster for the Games on 17 June 2021.[20]

Athlete Event Time Rank
George Bennett Men's road race[21] 6:11:46 26
Men's time trial 1:00:28.39 25
Patrick Bevin Men's road race did not finish
Men's time trial 57:24.29 10

Track[edit]

Following the completion of the 2020 UCI Track Cycling World Championships, New Zealand riders accumulated spots for both men and women in the team pursuit and madison, as well as the men's team sprint, based on their country's results in the final UCI Olympic rankings. As a result of their place in the men's team sprint, New Zealand won its right to enter two riders in the men's sprint and keirin.

On 19 November 2020, the New Zealand Olympic Committee officially named a fifteen-member track cycling squad for the rescheduled Tokyo 2020, with Aaron Gate, Jaime Nielsen, Rushlee Buchanan, and Rio 2016 team sprint silver medallist Ethan Mitchell racing around the velodrome at their third straight Olympics.[22]

Sprint
Athlete Event Qualification Round 1 Repechage 1 Round 2 Repechage 2 Round 3 Repechage 3 Quarterfinals Semifinals Final
Time
Speed (km/h)
Rank Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Rank
Ethan Mitchell Men's sprint 9.705
74.189
24 Q  Hoogland (NED)
L
 Awang (MAS)
 Quintero (COL)
L
Did not advance
Sam Webster 9.631
74.759
18 Q  Rudyk (POL)
W 10.099
71.294
Bye  Vigier (FRA)
W 9.845
73.134
Bye  Levy (GER)
L
 Vigier (FRA)
 Sahrom (MAS)
L
Did not advance
Ellesse Andrews Women's sprint 10.563
68.162
11 Q  McCulloch (AUS)
W 10.996
65.478
Bye  Starikova (UKR)
L
 Bao Sj (CHN)
W 11.144
64.609
 Mitchell (CAN)
L
 Zhong Ts (CHN)
 Starikova (UKR)
L
Did not advance
Kirstie James 11.116
64.772
27 Did not advance
Team sprint
Athlete Event Qualification Semifinals Final
Time
Speed (km/h)
Rank Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Rank Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Rank
Sam Dakin
Ethan Mitchell
Sam Webster
Callum Saunders[a]
Men's team sprint 43.066
62.694
5  France (FRA)
L 42.978
62.823
7  Poland (POL)
W 43.703
61.781
7
  1. ^ Saunders raced in the seventh-place final, replacing Sam Dakin
Pursuit
Athlete Event Qualification Semifinals Final
Time Rank Opponent
Results
Rank Opponent
Results
Rank
Aaron Gate
Regan Gough
Jordan Kerby
Campbell Stewart
Men's team pursuit 3:46.079 3 Q  Italy (ITA)
L 3:42.397
3 FB  Australia (AUS)
L OVL
4
Bryony Botha
Rushlee Buchanan
Holly Edmondston
Jaime Nielsen
Women's team pursuit 4:12.536 6 q  Australia (AUS)
L 4:10.223
7  France (FRA)
L 4:10.600
8

Qualification legend: Q: qualified, in contention for gold medal final; q: qualified, in contention for bronze medal final; FB: qualified for bronze medal final

Keirin
Athlete Event 1st Round Repechage Quarterfinals Semifinals Final
Rank Rank Rank Rank Rank
Callum Saunders Men's keirin 2 Q Bye 5 Did not advance
Sam Webster 5 R 3 Did not advance
Ellesse Andrews Women's keirin 4 R 1 Q 2 Q 2 Q 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Omnium
Athlete Event Scratch race Tempo race Elimination race Points race Total
Rank Points Rank Points Rank Points Rank Points Points Rank
Campbell Stewart Men's omnium 7 28 12 18 5 32 1 51 129 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Holly Edmondston Women's omnium 9 24 14 14 10 22 =5 7 67 10
Madison
Athlete Event Sprint points Lap points Total points Rank
Campbell Stewart
Corbin Strong
Men's madison 3 −20 −17 11
Rushlee Buchanan
Jessie Hodges
Women's madison 1 −40 −39 11

Mountain biking[edit]

New Zealand qualified one mountain biker for the men's Olympic cross-country race, as a result of his nation's sixteenth-place finish in the UCI Olympic Ranking List of 16 May 2021.[23] The New Zealand Olympic Committee nominated Anton Cooper to occupy the slot for the rescheduled Games on 17 June 2021.[20]

Athlete Event Time Rank
Anton Cooper Men's cross-country[24] 1:26:00 6

BMX[edit]

New Zealand riders qualified for one women's quota place in BMX at the Olympics, as a result of the nation's ninth-place finish in the UCI BMX Olympic Qualification Ranking List of 1 June 2021.[25] The New Zealand Olympic Committee nominated the BMX rider Rebecca Petch to occupy the slot for the rescheduled Games on 17 June 2021.[20]

Athlete Event Quarterfinal Semifinal Final
Points Rank Points Rank Result Rank
Rebecca Petch Women's race 10 3 Q 16 6 Did not advance

Diving[edit]

For the first time since Los Angeles 1984, New Zealand sent one male diver into the Olympic competition by finishing in the top eighteen of the men's springboard at the 2021 FINA Diving World Cup in Tokyo.[26]

Athlete Event Preliminary Semifinal Final
Points Rank Points Rank Points Rank
Anton Down-Jenkins Men's 3 m springboard 394.45 16 Q 424.80 8 Q 415.60 8

Equestrian[edit]

New Zealand fielded a squad of three equestrian riders each in the team eventing and jumping competitions through the 2018 FEI World Equestrian Games in Tryon, North Carolina, United States and the International Equestrian Federation (FEI)-designated Olympic jumping qualifier for Group G (South East Asia and Oceania) in Valkenswaard, Netherlands.[27][28] MeanwhIle, one dressage rider was added to the New Zealand roster by finishing in the top two, outside the group selection, of the individual FEI Olympic Rankings for Group G (South East Asia and Oceania).[29]

Shortly before the Olympics, New Zealand withdrew from competing in dressage. The nation's leading rider Melissa Galloway cited the disrupted preparations amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, EHV-1 outbreak and Brexit as the reason behind the withdrawal.[30]

Eventing[edit]

The New Zealand eventing team was named on 29 June 2021. Bundy Philpott and Tresca have been named the travelling reserves.[31]

Athlete Horse Event Dressage Cross-country Jumping Total
Qualifier Final
Penalties Rank Penalties Total Rank Penalties Total Rank Penalties Total Rank Penalties Rank
Jesse Campbell Diachello Individual 30.10 15 14.40 44.50 27 0.40 44.90 22 Q 9.60 54.50 22 54.40 22
Jonelle Price Grovine de Reve 30.70 17 2.00 32.70 12 0.00 32.70 9 Q 9.20 41.90 11 41.90 11
Tim Price Vitali 25.60 5 1.20 26.80 4 12.00 38.80 16 Q 21.60 60.40 25 60.40 25
Jesse Campbell
Jonelle Price
Tim Price
See above Team 86.40 3 17.60 104.0 4 12.40 116.40 5 116.40 5

Jumping[edit]

The New Zealand jumping team was named on 22 June 2021. The team consists of three Olympic veterans, while the California-based Uma O'Neill and Clockwise of Greenhill Z have been named the travelling reserves.[32]

Sharn Wordley later withdrew following an injury to his horse. Subsequently, Uma O'Neill got promoted to the team, while Tom Tarver-Priebe and Popeye were assigned the reserve spot.[33] The day before the team competition, a further change was made with Tarver-Priebe (Popeye) replacing O'Neill (Clockwise Of Greenhill Z).[34]

Athlete Horse Event Qualification Final
Penalties Rank Penalties Time Rank
Bruce Goodin Danny V Individual 13 =57 Did not advance
Daniel Meech Cinca 2 30 Q Eliminated
Uma O'Neill Clockwise of Greenhill Z 17 64 Did not advance
Bruce Goodin
Tom Tarver-Priebe
Daniel Meech
Danny V
Popeye
Cinca
Team 39 14 Did not advance

Field hockey[edit]

Summary
Team Event Group stage Quarterfinal Semifinal Final / BM
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Rank Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Rank
New Zealand men's Men's tournament  India
L 2–3
 Spain
W 4–3
 Japan
D 2–2
 Australia
L 2–4
 Argentina
L 1–4
5 Did not advance 9
New Zealand women's Women's tournament  Argentina
W 3–0
 Japan
W 2–1
 Spain
L 1–2
 Australia
L 0–1
 China
L 2–3
4  Netherlands
L 0–3
Did not advance 8

Men's tournament[edit]

New Zealand men's national field hockey team qualified for the Olympics by securing one of the seven tickets available and defeating South Korea in a playoff at the Stratford leg of the 2019 FIH Olympic Qualifiers.[35]

Team roster

The squad was announced on 10 June 2021.[36]

Head coach: Darren Smith[37]

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps GoalsClub
3 DF David Brydon (1996-06-27)27 June 1996 (aged 25) 58 0 New Zealand Southern Alpiners
4 DF Dane Lett (1990-08-29)29 August 1990 (aged 30) 83 2 New Zealand Central Falcons
7 MF Nicholas Ross (1990-07-26)26 July 1990 (aged 30) 133 4 New Zealand Southern Alpiners
11 FW Jacob Smith (1991-04-03)3 April 1991 (aged 30) 89 12 New Zealand Central Falcons
12 FW Sam Lane (1997-04-30)30 April 1997 (aged 24) 70 21 New Zealand Southern Alpiners
14 MF Jared Panchia (1993-10-18)18 October 1993 (aged 27) 139 26 New Zealand Hauraki Mavericks
17 DF Nicholas Woods (1995-08-26)26 August 1995 (aged 25) 131 21 New Zealand Hauraki Mavericks
20 GK Leon Hayward (1990-04-23)23 April 1990 (aged 31) 12 0 New Zealand Hauraki Mavericks
21 DF Kane Russell (1992-04-22)22 April 1992 (aged 29) 167 71 New Zealand Southern Alpiners
22 DF Blair Tarrant (Captain) (1990-05-11)11 May 1990 (aged 31) 217 4 New Zealand Southern Alpiners
23 MF Dylan Thomas (1996-02-14)14 February 1996 (aged 25) 32 2 New Zealand Central Falcons
24 MF Sean Findlay (2001-12-05)5 December 2001 (aged 19) 6 1 New Zealand Central Falcons
25 DF Shea McAleese (1984-08-07)7 August 1984 (aged 36) 316 34 New Zealand Central Falcons
27 FW Stephen Jenness (1990-06-07)7 June 1990 (aged 31) 254 92 New Zealand Central Falcons
29 MF Hugo Inglis (1991-01-18)18 January 1991 (aged 30) 237 66 New Zealand Southern Alpiners
30 FW George Muir (1994-02-24)24 February 1994 (aged 27) 146 18 New Zealand North Harbour
31 MF Steve Edwards (1986-01-25)25 January 1986 (aged 35) 226 23 New Zealand Northern Tridents
32 FW Nicholas Wilson (1990-08-06)6 August 1990 (aged 30) 176 77 New Zealand Central Falcons
Group play
Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Australia 5 4 1 0 22 9 +13 13 Quarter-finals
2  India 5 4 0 1 15 13 +2 12
3  Argentina 5 2 1 2 10 11 −1 7
4  Spain 5 1 2 2 9 10 −1 5
5  New Zealand 5 1 1 3 11 16 −5 4
6  Japan (H) 5 0 1 4 10 18 −8 1
Source: Tokyo 2020 and FIH
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) matches won; 3) goal difference; 4) goals for; 5) head-to-head result; 6) field goals scored.
(H) Host
24 July 2021 (2021-07-24)
10:00
v
New Zealand  2–3  India
Russell field hockey ball 6'
Jenness field hockey ball 43'
Report Rupinder field hockey ball 10'
Harmanpreet field hockey ball 26'33'
South Pitch
Umpires:
Martin Madden (SCO)
Coen van Bunge (NED)

25 July 2021 (2021-07-25)
20:45
v
Spain  3–4  New Zealand
González field hockey ball 26'
Quemada field hockey ball 31'
Boltó field hockey ball 39'
Report Jenness field hockey ball 14'
Tarrant field hockey ball 27'
Russell field hockey ball 48'
Smith field hockey ball 57'
North Pitch
Umpires:
Lim Hong Zhen (SGP)
Adam Kearns (AUS)

27 July 2021 (2021-07-27)
11:45
v
Japan  2–2  New Zealand
Yamasaki field hockey ball 3'
Ke. Tanaka field hockey ball 40'
Report Wilson field hockey ball 11'
Lane field hockey ball 41'
North Pitch
Umpires:
Ben Göntgen (GER)
Germán Montes de Oca (ARG)

28 July 2021 (2021-07-28)
21:15
v
Australia  4–2  New Zealand
Brand field hockey ball 9'50'
Govers field hockey ball 55'
Wickham field hockey ball 57'
Report Russell field hockey ball 13'58'
South Pitch
Umpires:
Francisco Vázquez (ESP)
Marcin Grochal (POL)

30 July 2021 (2021-07-30)
19:00
v
Argentina  4–1  New Zealand
Martínez field hockey ball 15+'
Vila field hockey ball 17'
Tolini field hockey ball 44'
Keenan field hockey ball 60'
Report Russell field hockey ball 14'
South Pitch
Umpires:
Martin Madden (GBR)
Coen van Bunge (NED)

Women's tournament[edit]

New Zealand women's field hockey team qualified for the Olympics by winning the gold medal on a goal difference over Australia at the 2019 Oceania Cup in Rockhampton, Queensland.[38]

Team roster

The squad was announced on 10 June 2021.[39]

Head coach: Ireland Graham Shaw

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps GoalsClub
1 DF Tarryn Davey (1996-02-29)29 February 1996 (aged 25) 66 1 New Zealand Hauraki Mavericks
2 FW Olivia Shannon (2001-05-23)23 May 2001 (aged 20) 29 4 New Zealand Central Falcons
4 FW Olivia Merry (1992-03-16)16 March 1992 (aged 29) 236 113 New Zealand Southern Alpiners
5 DF Frances Davies (1996-10-18)18 October 1996 (aged 24) 81 0 New Zealand Southern Alpiners
6 FW Hope Ralph (2000-04-14)14 April 2000 (aged 21) 11 2 New Zealand Central Falcons
8 MF Julia King (1992-12-08)8 December 1992 (aged 28) 125 9 New Zealand Hauraki Mavericks
12 DF Ella Gunson (1989-07-09)9 July 1989 (aged 32) 224 11 New Zealand Northern Tridents
13 MF Sam Charlton (1991-12-07)7 December 1991 (aged 29) 255 8 New Zealand Midlands
15 GK Grace O'Hanlon (1992-09-10)10 September 1992 (aged 28) 63 0 New Zealand Hauraki Mavericks
16 DF Elizabeth Thompson (1994-12-08)8 December 1994 (aged 26) 191 12 New Zealand Hauraki Mavericks
17 DF Stephanie Dickins (1995-01-09)9 January 1995 (aged 26) 27 2 New Zealand Northern Tridents
19 DF Tessa Jopp (1995-06-18)18 June 1995 (aged 26) 26 1 New Zealand Southern Alpiners
20 DF Megan Hull (1996-05-12)12 May 1996 (aged 25) 35 1 New Zealand Central Falcons
22 MF Katie Doar (2001-09-11)11 September 2001 (aged 19) 19 0 New Zealand Northern Tridents
24 MF Rose Keddell (1994-01-31)31 January 1994 (aged 27) 211 16 New Zealand Hauraki Mavericks
25 MF Kelsey Smith (1994-08-11)11 August 1994 (aged 26) 99 14 New Zealand Central Falcons
27 FW Holly Pearson (1998-09-07)7 September 1998 (aged 22) 24 0 New Zealand Central Falcons
31 MF Stacey Michelsen (Captain) (1991-02-18)18 February 1991 (aged 30) 291 34 New Zealand Northern Tridents
Group play
Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Australia 5 5 0 0 13 1 +12 15 Quarterfinals
2  Spain 5 3 0 2 9 8 +1 9
3  Argentina 5 3 0 2 8 8 0 9
4  New Zealand 5 2 0 3 8 7 +1 6
5  China 5 2 0 3 9 16 −7 6
6  Japan (H) 5 0 0 5 6 13 −7 0
Source: Tokyo 2020 and FIH
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) matches won; 3) goal difference; 4) goals for; 5) head-to-head result; 6) field goals scored.
(H) Host
25 July 2021 (2021-07-25)
12:15
v
New Zealand  3–0  Argentina
Smith field hockey ball 35'
Ralph field hockey ball 40'
Pearson field hockey ball 54'
Report
South Pitch
Umpires:
Sarah Wilson (GBR)
Maggie Giddens (USA)

26 July 2021 (2021-07-26)
20:45
v
Japan  1–2  New Zealand
Oikawa field hockey ball 18' Report Merry field hockey ball 26'
Ralph field hockey ball 29'
North Pitch
Umpires:
Irene Presenqui (ARG)
Annelize Rostron (RSA)

28 July 2021 (2021-07-28)
11:45
v
New Zealand  1–2  Spain
Smith field hockey ball 35' Report Iglesias field hockey ball 8'
Riera field hockey ball 22'
North Pitch
Umpires:
Carolina de la Fuente (ARG)
Michelle Meister (GER)

29 July 2021 (2021-07-29)
21:15
v
New Zealand  0–1  Australia
Report Chalker field hockey ball 34'
South Pitch
Umpires:
Sarah Wilson (GBR)
Laurine Delforge (BEL)

31 July 2021 (2021-07-31)
09:30
v
China  3–2  New Zealand
Liu field hockey ball 24'
Chen Y. field hockey ball 37'
Liang field hockey ball 54'
Report Gunson field hockey ball 20'
Keddell field hockey ball 45'
North Pitch
Umpires:
Laurine Delforge (BEL)
Ayanna McClean (TTO)
Quarterfinal
2 August 2021 (2021-08-02)
18:30
v
Netherlands  3–0  New Zealand
Welten field hockey ball 7'
Matla field hockey ball 21'
Stam field hockey ball 37'
Report
Umpires:
Michelle Meister (GER)
Michelle Joubert (RSA)

Football[edit]

Summary

Key:

Team Event Group stage Quarterfinal Semifinal Final / BM
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Rank Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Rank
New Zealand men's Men's tournament  South Korea
W 1–0
 Honduras
L 2–3
 Romania
D 0–0
2  Japan
L 2–4P
0–0 (a.e.t.)
Did not advance 6
New Zealand women's Women's tournament  Australia
L 1–2
 United States
L 1–6
 Sweden
L 0–2
4 Did not advance 12

Men's tournament[edit]

New Zealand men's football team qualified for the Olympics by winning the gold medal and securing an outright berth at the 2019 OFC Olympic Qualifying Tournament in Fiji.[40]

Team roster

New Zealand's 18-man squad was announced on 25 June 2021.[41] As well as the reserves players named, Tim Payne was named as a replacement in the event that Winston Reid didn't receive a release to travel.[42] On 2 July 2021, Reid was confirmed as available for selection.[43]

Head coach: Danny Hay

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 1GK Michael Woud (1999-01-16)16 January 1999 (aged 22) 2 0 Netherlands Almere City
2 2DF Winston Reid* (captain) (1988-07-03)3 July 1988 (aged 33) 2 0 England Brentford
3 2DF Liberato Cacace (2000-09-27)27 September 2000 (aged 20) 6 0 Belgium Sint-Truiden
4 2DF Nando Pijnaker (1999-02-25)25 February 1999 (aged 22) 2 0 Portugal Rio Ave
5 2DF Michael Boxall* (1988-08-18)18 August 1988 (aged 32) 12 1 United States Minnesota United
6 3MF Clayton Lewis (1997-02-12)12 February 1997 (aged 24) 12 4 New Zealand Wellington Phoenix
7 4FW Elijah Just (2000-05-01)1 May 2000 (aged 21) 2 1 Denmark Helsingør
8 3MF Joe Bell (1999-04-27)27 April 1999 (aged 22) 2 0 Norway Viking
9 4FW Chris Wood* (1991-12-07)7 December 1991 (aged 29) 7 2 England Burnley
10 3MF Marko Stamenic (2002-02-19)19 February 2002 (aged 19) 1 0 Denmark Copenhagen
11 4FW Joe Champness (1997-04-27)27 April 1997 (aged 24) 2 0 Australia Brisbane Roar
12 4FW Callum McCowatt (1999-04-30)30 April 1999 (aged 22) 2 0 Denmark Helsingør
13 1GK Jamie Searle (2000-11-25)25 November 2000 (aged 20) 1 0 Wales Swansea City
14 2DF George Stanger (2000-08-15)15 August 2000 (aged 20) 3 0 Scotland Hamilton Academical
15 2DF Dane Ingham (1999-06-08)8 June 1999 (aged 22) 2 0 Australia Perth Glory
16 3MF Gianni Stensness (1999-02-07)7 February 1999 (aged 22) 9 0 Australia Central Coast Mariners
17 2DF Callan Elliot (1999-07-07)7 July 1999 (aged 22) 5 1 Greece Xanthi
18 4FW Ben Waine (2001-06-11)11 June 2001 (aged 20) 7 8 New Zealand Wellington Phoenix
19 4FW Matthew Garbett (2002-04-13)13 April 2002 (aged 19) 1 0 Sweden Falkenbergs FF
20 3MF Sam Sutton (2001-12-10)10 December 2001 (aged 19) 2 0 New Zealand Wellington Phoenix
21 3MF Ben Old (2002-08-13)13 August 2002 (aged 18) 0 0 New Zealand Lower Hutt City
22 1GK Alex Paulsen (2002-07-04)4 July 2002 (aged 19) 1 0 New Zealand Lower Hutt City

* Overage player.

Group play
Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  South Korea 3 2 0 1 10 1 +9 6 Advance to knockout stage
2  New Zealand 3 1 1 1 3 3 0 4
3  Romania 3 1 1 1 1 4 −3 4
4  Honduras 3 1 0 2 3 9 −6 3
Source: TOCOG and FIFA
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
New Zealand 1–0 South Korea
Wood 70' Report (TOCOG)
Report (FIFA)


Romania 0–0 New Zealand
Report (TOCOG)
Report (FIFA)
Referee: Kevin Ortega (Peru)

Quarter-final

Women's tournament[edit]

New Zealand women's football team qualified for the Olympics by winning the gold medal and securing an outright berth at the 2018 OFC Women's Nations Cup in New Caledonia.[44]

Team roster

The final squad of 22 athletes was announced on 25 June 2021.[45]

Head coach: Scotland Tom Sermanni

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 1GK Erin Nayler (1992-04-17)17 April 1992 (aged 29) 71 0 England Reading
2 3MF Ria Percival (1989-12-07)7 December 1989 (aged 31) 150 14 England Tottenham Hotspur
3 2DF Anna Green (1990-08-20)20 August 1990 (aged 30) 77 7 New Zealand Lower Hutt City
4 2DF C. J. Bott (1995-04-22)22 April 1995 (aged 26) 24 1 Norway Vålerenga Fotball Damer
5 2DF Meikayla Moore (1996-06-04)4 June 1996 (aged 25) 41 3 England Liverpool
6 2DF Claudia Bunge (1999-09-21)21 September 1999 (aged 21) 4 0 Australia Melbourne Victory
7 2DF Ali Riley (captain) (1987-10-30)30 October 1987 (aged 33) 134 1 United States Orlando Pride
8 2DF Abby Erceg (1989-11-20)20 November 1989 (aged 31) 141 6 United States North Carolina Courage
9 4FW Gabi Rennie (2001-07-07)7 July 2001 (aged 20) 0 0 United States Indiana Hoosiers
10 3MF Annalie Longo (1991-07-01)1 July 1991 (aged 30) 123 15 Australia Melbourne Victory
11 3MF Olivia Chance (1993-10-05)5 October 1993 (aged 27) 20 1 Australia Brisbane Roar
12 3MF Betsy Hassett (1990-08-04)4 August 1990 (aged 30) 119 13 Iceland Stjarnan
13 4FW Paige Satchell (1998-04-13)13 April 1998 (aged 23) 18 1 Australia Canberra United
14 3MF Katie Bowen (1994-04-15)15 April 1994 (aged 27) 70 3 United States Kansas City NWSL
15 3MF Daisy Cleverley (1997-04-30)30 April 1997 (aged 24) 9 2 United States Georgetown Hoyas
16 3MF Emma Rolston (1996-11-10)10 November 1996 (aged 24) 5 6 New Zealand Northern Lights
17 4FW Hannah Wilkinson (1992-05-28)28 May 1992 (aged 29) 97 26 Germany MSV Duisburg
18 1GK Anna Leat (2001-06-26)26 June 2001 (aged 20) 4 0 New Zealand FFDP
19 2DF Elizabeth Anton (1998-12-12)12 December 1998 (aged 22) 5 0 New Zealand FFDP
20 2DF Marisa van der Meer (2002-03-27)27 March 2002 (aged 19) 0 0 New Zealand FFDP
21 4FW Michaela Robertson (1996-08-28)28 August 1996 (aged 24) 0 0 New Zealand Lower Hutt City
22 1GK Victoria Esson (1991-03-06)6 March 1991 (aged 30) 3 0 Norway Avaldsnes
Group play
Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Sweden 3 3 0 0 9 2 +7 9 Advance to knockout stage
2  United States 3 1 1 1 6 4 +2 4
3  Australia 3 1 1 1 4 5 −1 4
4  New Zealand 3 0 0 3 2 10 −8 0
Source: TOCOG and FIFA
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
Australia 2–1 New Zealand
Report (TOCOG)
Report (FIFA)

New Zealand 1–6 United States
Report (TOCOG)
Report (FIFA)

New Zealand 0–2 Sweden
Report (TOCOG)
Report (FIFA)

Golf[edit]

New Zealand announced a team of two golfers in July 2021.[47] Danny Lee qualified but chose not to play.[48]

Athlete Event Round 1 Round 2 Round 3 Round 4 Total
Score Score Score Score Score Par Rank
Ryan Fox Men's 70 72 73 64 279 −5 =42
Lydia Ko Women's 70 67 66 65 268 −16[a] 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
  1. ^ Finished tied for second, and lost sudden-death playoff on first hole to win bronze medal

Gymnastics[edit]

Artistic[edit]

New Zealand entered one male artistic gymnast into the Olympic competition by winning the gold medal and securing an outright berth at the 2021 Oceanian Championships in Queensland, Australia.

Men
Athlete Event Qualification Final
Apparatus Total Rank Apparatus Total Rank
F PH R V PB HB F PH R V PB HB
Mikhail Koudinov All-around 13.433 12.466 12.600 13.766 14.433 11.366 78.064 52 Did not advance

Trampoline[edit]

New Zealand qualified one gymnast each to compete in the men's and women's trampoline by finishing among the top eight nations vying for qualification at the two-year-long World Cup Series. Maddie Davidson will be New Zealand's first female trampolinist at the Olympics.[49]

Athlete Event Qualification Final
Routine 1 Routine 2 Total score Rank Score Rank
Dylan Schmidt Men's 52.415 59.705 112.120 3 Q 60.675 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Maddie Davidson Women's 47.870 45.270 93.140 10 Did not advance

Karate[edit]

New Zealand entered one karateka into the inaugural Olympic tournament. Alexandrea Anacan secured a place in the women's kata category, as the highest-ranked karateka vying for qualification from the Oceania zone based on the WKD Olympic Rankings.[50]

Kata
Athlete Event Elimination round Ranking round Final / BM
Score Rank Score Rank Opposition
Result
Rank
Andrea Anacan Women's kata 23.62 5 did not advance

Rowing[edit]

New Zealand qualified ten out of fourteen boats for each of the following rowing classes into the Olympic regatta, with the majority of crews confirming Olympic places for their boats at the 2019 FISA World Championships in Ottensheim, Austria.[51][52][53] In May 2021, the men's eight crew was added to the New Zealand roster with a top-two finish at the 2021 FISA Final Qualification Regatta in Lucerne, Switzerland.[54]

On 23 April 2021, the New Zealand Olympic Committee declined its quota place in the women's lightweight double sculls, having previously confirmed it from the 2019 Worlds.[55]

Men
Athlete Event Heats Repechage Quarterfinals Semifinals Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Jordan Parry Single sculls 7:04.45 2 QF Bye 7:18.48 4 SC/D 6:57.70 1 FC 6:55.55 13
Stephen Jones
Brook Robertson
Pair 6:56.53 3 SA/B Bye 6:41.46 6 FB 6:38.30 12
Chris Harris
Jack Lopas
Double sculls 6:12.05 3 SA/B Bye 6:26.08 4 FB 6:15.51 8
Hamish Bond
Sam Bosworth (cox)
Michael Brake
Shaun Kirkham
Matt Macdonald
Tom Mackintosh
Tom Murray
Dan Williamson
Phillip Wilson
Eight 5:32.11 2 R 5:22.04 1 FA 5:24.64 1st place, gold medalist(s)
Women
Athlete Event Heats Repechage Quarterfinals Semifinals Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Emma Twigg Single sculls 7:35.22 1 QF Bye 7:54.96 1 SA/B 7:20.70 1 FA 7:13.97 OR 1st place, gold medalist(s)
Kerri Gowler
Grace Prendergast
Pair 7:19.08 1 SA/B Bye 6:47.41 WR 1 FA 6:50.19 1st place, gold medalist(s)
Brooke Donoghue
Hannah Osborne
Double sculls 6:53.62 1 SA/B Bye 7:09.05 2 FA 6:44.82 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Olivia Loe
Eve MacFarlane
Georgia Nugent-O'Leary
Ruby Tew
Quadruple sculls 6:25.23 5 R 6:39.91 3 FB 6:29.00 8
Kelsey Bevan
Jackie Gowler
Kerri Gowler
Ella Greenslade
Emma Dyke
Grace Prendergast
Beth Ross
Caleb Shepherd (cox)
Lucy Spoors
Eight 6:07.65 1 FA Bye 6:00.04 2nd place, silver medalist(s)

The make up of the eight had initially not been determined, with ten rowers—including two pairs of sisters—who were to travel to the Olympics: Kerri Gowler and Grace Prendergast (who will also compete in the pair), Jackie Gowler, Beth Ross, Phoebe Spoors, Kirstyn Goodger, Kelsey Bevan, Lucy Spoors, Emma Dyke, and Ella Greenslade.[56][57]

Qualification Legend: FA=Final A (medal); FB=Final B (non-medal); FC=Final C (non-medal); FD=Final D (non-medal); FE=Final E (non-medal); FF=Final F (non-medal); SA/B=Semifinals A/B; SC/D=Semifinals C/D; SE/F=Semifinals E/F; QF=Quarterfinals; R=Repechage

Rugby sevens[edit]

Summary
Team Event Pool round Quarterfinal Semifinal Final / BM
Opposition
result
Opposition
result
Opposition
result
Rank Opposition
result
Opposition
result
Opposition
result
Rank
New Zealand men Men's tournament  South Korea
W 50–5
 Argentina
W 35–14
 Australia
W 14–12
1  Canada
W 21–10
 Great Britain
W 29–7
 Fiji
L 12–27
2nd place, silver medalist(s)
New Zealand women Women's tournament  Kenya
W 29–7
 Great Britain
W 26–21
ROC
W 33–0
1 ROC
W 36–0
 Fiji
W 22–17
 France
W 26–12
1st place, gold medalist(s)

Men's tournament[edit]

The New Zealand national rugby sevens team qualified for the Olympics by advancing to the quarterfinals in the 2019 London Sevens, securing a top four spot in the 2018–19 World Rugby Sevens Series.[58]

Team roster

New Zealand's 12-man squad plus one alternate was named on 6 July 2021.[59] Amanaki Nicole replaced Sam Dickson due to injury on 23 July 2021.[60]

Head coach: Clark Laidlaw

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Events Points
1 FW Scott Curry (c) (1988-05-17)17 May 1988 (aged 33) 54 620
2 FW Tim Mikkelson (c) (1986-08-13)13 August 1986 (aged 34) 91 1,195
3 FW Tone Ng Shiu (1994-05-26)26 May 1994 (aged 27) 27 160
4 BK Etene Nanai-Seturo (1999-08-20)20 August 1999 (aged 21) 11 70
5 FW Dylan Collier (1991-04-27)27 April 1991 (aged 30) 38 255
6 BK Ngarohi McGarvey-Black (1996-05-20)20 May 1996 (aged 25) 12 152
7 FW Amanaki Nicole (1992-02-08)8 February 1992 (aged 29) 50 490
8 BK Andrew Knewstubb (1995-09-14)14 September 1995 (aged 25) 25 527
9 BK Regan Ware (1994-08-07)7 August 1994 (aged 26) 36 490
10 BK Kurt Baker (1988-10-07)7 October 1988 (aged 32) 43 796
11 BK Joe Webber (1993-08-27)27 August 1993 (aged 27) 38 480
12 BK Sione Molia (1993-09-05)5 September 1993 (aged 27) 37 330
13 BK William Warbrick (1998-03-06)6 March 1998 (aged 23) 3 5
Group play
Pos Team Pld W D L PF PA PD Pts Qualification
1  New Zealand 3 3 0 0 99 31 +68 9 Quarter-finals
2  Argentina 3 2 0 1 99 54 +45 7
3  Australia 3 1 0 2 73 48 +25 5
4  South Korea 3 0 0 3 10 148 −138 3
Source: Tokyo 2020 and World Rugby
Rules for classification: 1) Points; 2) Head-to-head result; 3) Point difference; 4) Points scored.
26 July 2021 (2021-07-26)
10:00
New Zealand 50–5 South Korea
Try: Knewstubb 2' c
Mikkelson (2) 7' c, 8' m
Penalty try 8'
Warbrick (2) 10' c, 14' m
Nanai-Seturo 12' m
McGarvey-Black 13' c
Con: Knewstubb (2/3) 2', 7'
McGarvey-Black (2/3) 10', 13'
Baker (0/1)
(Tokyo 2020)Try: Jeong 5' m
Con: Lee (0/1)
Tokyo Stadium, Tokyo
Attendance: 0
Referee: Sam Grove-White (Scotland)

26 July 2021 (2021-07-26)
17:30
New Zealand 35–14 Argentina
Try: McGarvey-Black 4' c
Molia 6' c
Webber 10' c
Mikkelson 12' c
Warbrick 14' c
Con: McGarvey-Black (2/2) 5', 7'
Webber (1/1) 10'
Knewstubb (2/2) 13', 14'
(Tokyo 2020)Try: Moneta 2' c
González 8' c
Con: Mare (2/2) 2', 8'
Tokyo Stadium, Tokyo
Attendance: 0
Referee: Craig Evans (Wales)

27 July 2021 (2021-07-27)
10:30
New Zealand 14–12 Australia
Try: Collier 8' c
Knewstubb 10' c
Con: Knewstubb (2/2) 8', 10'
(Tokyo 2020)Try: Kerevi 1' c
Malouf 5' m
Con: Holland (1/2) 1'
Tokyo Stadium, Tokyo
Attendance: 0
Referee: Sam Grove-White (Scotland)

Quarter-final
27 July 2021 (2021-07-27)
17:30
New Zealand 21–10 Canada
Try: Knewstubb 4' c
Curry (2) 6' c, 7' c
Con: Knewstubb (2/2) 4', 6'
Curry (1/1) 7'
(Tokyo 2020)Try: Kay 13' m
Jones 14' m
Con: Kay (0/2)
Tokyo Stadium, Tokyo
Attendance: 0
Referee: Jordan Way (Australia)

Semi-final
28 July 2021 (2021-07-28)
11:00
New Zealand 29–7 Great Britain
Try: Curry (2) 2' c, 13' m
Ware (2) 7' c, 9' m
Collier 10' m
Con: Knewstubb (2/4) 2', 7'
McGarvey-Black (0/1)
(Tokyo 2020)Try: Norton 3' c
Con: Bibby (1/1) 3'
Tokyo Stadium, Tokyo
Attendance: 0
Referee: Damon Murphy (Australia)

Gold medal match
28 July 2021 (2021-07-28)
18:00
2nd place, silver medalist(s) New Zealand 12–27 Fiji 1st place, gold medalist(s)
Try: Curry 3' m
Molia 8' c
Con: Knewstubb (1/2) 8'
(Tokyo 2020)Try: Derenalagi 1' m
Maqala 3' c
Wainiqolo 4' c
Tuivuaka 11' m
Con: Bolaca (2/3) 3', 5'
Nacuqu (0/1)
Pen: Nacuqu (1/1) 14'
Tokyo Stadium, Tokyo
Attendance: 0
Referee: Damon Murphy (Australia)

Women's tournament[edit]

The New Zealand women's national rugby sevens team qualified for the Olympics by securing a top four position in the 2018–19 World Rugby Women's Sevens Series through winning the penultimate leg.[61]

Team roster
  • Women's team event – 1 team of 12 players
Group play
Pos Team Pld W D L PF PA PD Pts Qualification
1  New Zealand 3 3 0 0 88 28 +60 9 Quarter-finals
2  Great Britain 3 2 0 1 66 38 +28 7
3 ROC 3 1 0 2 47 59 −12 5
4  Kenya 3 0 0 3 19 95 −76 3
Source: Tokyo 2020 and World Rugby
Rules for classification: 1) Points; 2) Head-to-head result; 3) Point difference; 4) Points scored.
29 July 2021 (2021-07-29)
11:30
New Zealand 29–7 Kenya
Try: Fluhler 1' m
Blyde (2) 3' c, 9' c
Woodman 5' m
Broughton 11' m
Con: Nathan-Wong (2/5) 3', 9'
(Tokyo 2020)Try: Lindo 7' +1 c
Con: Okulu (1/1) 7' +1
Tokyo Stadium, Tokyo

29 July 2021 (2021-07-29)
18:30
New Zealand 26–21 Great Britain
Try: Blyde (3) 5' c, 7' m, 13' c
Nathan-Wong 9' c
Con: Nathan-Wong (3/4) 6', 9', 14'
(Tokyo 2020)Try: Rowland 1' c
Jones 2' c
Joyce 4' c
Con: Aitchison (3/3) 1', 3', 4'
Tokyo Stadium, Tokyo

30 July 2021 (2021-07-30)
13:00[note 1]
New Zealand 33–0 ROC
Try: Tui (2) 1' c, 6' c
Woodman 7' c
Fluhler (2) 10' c, 12' m
Con: Nathan-Wong (3/3) 2', 6', 7', 10
Willison (0/1)
(Tokyo 2020)
Tokyo Stadium, Tokyo
  1. ^ Originally scheduled for 11:30 but delayed due to weather

Quarter-final
30 July 2021 (2021-07-30)
17:30
New Zealand 36–0 ROC
Try: Fitzpatrick 1' c
Broughton 2' c
Blyde 4' c
Woodman (2) 8' c, 13' m
Tui 10' c
Con: Nathan-Wong (2/4) 1', 8'
Pouri-Lane (1/2) 10'
(Tokyo 2020)
Tokyo Stadium, Tokyo

Semi-final
31 July 2021 (2021-07-31)
11:00
New Zealand 22–17 (a.e.t.) Fiji
Try: Broughton (2) 2' m, 16' m
Woodman 10' c
Fluhler 14' m
Con: Nathan-Wong (1/3) 11'
(Tokyo 2020)Try: Solikoviti 4' c, 9' m
Ulunisau 14+' m
Con: Riwai (1/3) 4'
Tokyo Stadium, Tokyo

Gold medal match
31 July 2021 (2021-07-31)
18:00
New Zealand 26–12 France
Try: Blyde 1' c
Broughton 5' m
Fluhler 6' c
Nathan-Wong 11' c
Con: Nathan-Wong (3/4) 1', 7', 11'
(Tokyo 2020)Try: Drouin 3' m
Ciofani 8' c
Con: Drouin (1/2) 9'
Tokyo Stadium, Tokyo

Sailing[edit]

New Zealand sailors qualified one boat in each of the following classes through the 2018 Sailing World Championships, the class-associated Worlds, and the continental regattas.[62][63] On 4 March 2020, New Zealand Olympic Committee officially announced the first seven sailors to compete at the Enoshima regatta, including defending 49er champions Peter Burling and Blair Tuke, Rio 2016 49erFX silver medallists Alex Maloney and Molly Meech, and Rio 2016 Laser bronze medallist Sam Meech.[64] The men's 470 crew members Paul Snow-Hansen and Daniel Willcox were named to the New Zealand team on 30 September 2020, with Rio 2016 Olympian Josh Junior completing the sailing selection at the 2021 Finn Gold Cup in Lisbon, Portugal.[65][66]

At the end of the qualifying window, the New Zealand Olympic Committee officially declined the quota places already obtained at the respective Sailing World Championships in the following classes: men's and women's RS:X, women's Laser Radial, and women's 470.

Men
Athlete Event Race Net points Final rank
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 M*
Sam Meech Laser 19 19 8 16 14 3 2 13 11 3 20 109 10
Josh Junior Finn 12 10 3 7 8 5 1 4 8 1 16 63 5
Paul Snow-Hansen
Daniel Willcox
470 6 2 7 1 5 7 13 8 6 3 6 57 4
Peter Burling
Blair Tuke
49er 12 3 7 2 10 1 3 6 2 5 2 11 6 58 2nd place, silver medalist(s)
Women
Athlete Event Race Net points Final rank
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 M*
Alex Maloney
Molly Meech
49er FX 16 22 5 12 4 4 8 3 18 6 20 6 EL 102 12
Mixed
Athlete Event Race Net points Final rank
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 M*
Micah Wilkinson
Erica Dawson
Nacra 17 11 12 13 11 8 12 15 9 18 17 8 14 EL 130 12

M* = Medal race (double points); EL = Eliminated – did not advance into the medal race

Shooting[edit]

New Zealand shooters achieved quota places for the following events by virtue of their best finishes at the 2018 ISSF World Championships, the 2019 ISSF World Cup series, and Oceania Championships, as long as they obtained a minimum qualifying score (MQS) by 31 May 2020.[67]

Rio 2016 Olympians Chloe Tipple (women's skeet) and silver medalist Natalie Rooney were officially selected to the New Zealand team before the Games postponed on 24 March 2020.[68]

Athlete Event Qualification Final
Points Rank Points Rank
Natalie Rooney Women's trap 117 10 did not advance
Chloe Tipple Women's skeet 108 27 did not advance

Surfing[edit]

New Zealand sent two surfers (one man and one woman) to compete in their respective shortboard races at the Games. Billy Stairmand and Ella Williams secured a qualification slot each for their nation, as the highest-ranked and last remaining surfers from Oceania, at the 2019 ISA World Surfing Games in Miyazaki, Japan.[69][70]

Athlete Event Round 1 Round 2 Round 3 Quarterfinal Semifinal Final / BM
Points Rank Points Rank Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Rank
Billy Stairmand Men's shortboard 9.97 3 q 11.34 3 Q  Ferreira (BRA)
L 9.67–14.54
Did not advance
Ella Williams Women's shortboard 9.70 2 Q Bye  Hennessy (CRC)
L 7.73–12.00
Did not advance

Swimming[edit]

New Zealand swimmers further achieved qualifying standards in the following events (up to a maximum of 2 swimmers in each event at the Olympic Qualifying Time (OQT), and potentially 1 at the Olympic Selection Time (OST)):[71][72] To assure their selection to the Olympic team, swimmers must attain an Olympic qualifying cut in each individual pool event at any FINA-sanctioned meet between March 2019 and 21 May 2021.[73] The team was announced on 16 June 2021.[74]

Athlete Event Heat Semifinal Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Lewis Clareburt Men's 200 m individual medley 1:57.27 NR 3 Q 1:57.55 7 Q 1:57.70 8
Men's 400 m individual medley 4:09.49 NR 2 Q 4:11.22 7
Zac Reid Men's 400 m freestyle 3:49.85 23 did not advance
Men's 800 m freestyle 7:53.06 NR 18 did not advance
Erika Fairweather Women's 200 m freestyle 1:57.26 14 Q 1:59.14 16 did not advance
Women's 400 m freestyle 4:02.28 NR 4 Q 4:08.01 8
Ali Galyer Women's 100 m backstroke 1:02.65 33 did not advance
Women's 200 m backstroke 2:15.16 24 did not advance
Hayley McIntosh Women's 1500 m freestyle 16:44.43 31 did not advance
Eve Thomas Women's 800 m freestyle 8:32.51 18 did not advance
Women's 1500 m freestyle 16:29.66 26 did not advance
Carina Doyle
Erika Fairweather
Ali Galyer
Eve Thomas
Women's 4 × 200 m freestyle relay 8:06.16 12 did not advance

Taekwondo[edit]

New Zealand entered one athlete into the taekwondo competition at the Games. Tom Burns secured a spot in the men's lightweight category (68 kg) with a gold-medal triumph at the 2020 Oceania Qualification Tournament in Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.[75][76]

Athlete Event Round of 16 Quarterfinals Semifinals Repechage Final / BM
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Rank
Tom Burns Men's −68 kg  Sinden (GBR)
L 8–53 PTG
Did not advance  Reçber (TUR)
L 8–23
Did not advance 7

Tennis[edit]

On 23 June 2021, Tennis New Zealand announced that Marcus Daniell and Michael Venus would represent New Zealand in men's doubles for the second consecutive Olympic Games.[77]

Athlete Event Round of 32 Round of 16 Quarterfinals Semifinals Final / BM
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Rank
Marcus Daniell
Michael Venus
Men's doubles  Gerasimov /
Ivashka (BLR)
W 6–3, 7–6
 Koolhof /
Rojer (NED)
W WO
 Cabal /
Farah (COL)
W 6–3, 3–6, [10–7]
 Čilić /
Dodig (CRO)
L 2–6, 2–6
 Krajicek /
Sandgren (USA)
W 7–6, 6–2
3rd place, bronze medalist(s)

Triathlon[edit]

New Zealand qualified four triathletes (two per gender) for the following events at the Games by finishing among the top seven nations in the ITU Mixed Relay Olympic Rankings.[78]

Individual
Athlete Event Time Rank
Swim (1.5 km) Trans 1 Bike (40 km) Trans 2 Run (10 km) Total
Tayler Reid Men's 17:45 0:37 56:40 0:27 31:25 1:46:54 18
Hayden Wilde 18:17 0:39 56:07 0:29 29:52 1:45:24 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Ainsley Thorpe Women's 19:15 0:43 Did not finish
Nicole van der Kaay 19:35 0:42 1:05:02 0:33 37:34 2:03:26 29
Relay
Athlete Event Time Rank
Swim (300 m) Trans 1 Bike (7 km) Trans 2 Run (2 km) Total group
Tayler Reid Mixed relay 3:56 0:36 9:49 0:28 5:49 20:38
Hayden Wilde 4:21 0:35 9:29 0:29 5:41 20:35
Ainsley Thorpe 3:51 0:41 10:33 0:31 7:06 22:42
Nicole van der Kaay 4:39 0:41 10:47 0:31 6:20 22:58
Total 1:26:53 12

Weightlifting[edit]

New Zealand entered five weightlifters (two men and three women) into the Olympic competition. Laurel Hubbard, who made history as the first openly transgender weightlifter to compete at the Games, finished seventh of the eight entrants in the women's +87 kg category based on the IWF Absolute World Rankings, with Cameron McTaggart (men's 81 kg), David Liti (men's +109 kg), Megan Signal (women's 76 kg), and Kanah Andrews-Nahu (women's 87 kg) topping the field of weightlifters vying for qualification from Oceania based on the IWF Absolute Continental Rankings.[79][80] Megan Signal withdrew due to injury shortly before her competition began.[81]

Athlete Event Snatch Clean & Jerk Total Rank
Result Rank Result Rank
Cameron McTaggart Men's −81 kg 140 13 175 11 315 11
David Liti Men's +109 kg 178 9 236 3 414 5
Kanah Andrews-Nahu Women's −87 kg 94 13 112 13 206 13
Laurel Hubbard Women's +87 kg 125 DNF DNF

Sports that declined qualification allocations[edit]

Archery[edit]

New Zealand had last competed in archery at the 2004 Athens Olympics. The country qualified one male and one female archer at the 2019 Pacific Games in Apia, Samoa, through Olivia Hodgson and Adam Kaluzny beating their Australian competitors.[82] To gain nomination at the Olympics, athletes need to be put forward by Archery New Zealand (ANZ) to the New Zealand Olympic Committee, but the organisation argued that no New Zealand archers had met their criteria. Two female archers, Hodgson and Olivia Sloan, separately appealed to the Sports Tribunal to have ANZ's decision overturned. The tribunal, made up by chair Bruce Robertson, Robbie Hart and Pippa Hayward, upheld ANZ's decision in June 2021.[83]

Artistic swimming[edit]

New Zealand qualified for a squad of two artistic swimmers to compete in the women's duet event, by securing an outright berth as the next highest-ranked pair, not yet qualified, for Oceania at the 2019 FINA World Championships in Gwangju, South Korea, marking the country's recurrence to the sport for the first time since Beijing 2008.[84] Artistic Swimming NZ subsequently declined to take up the spot, and its place will be reassigned to another country by FINA (the International Swimming Federation).[85]

Badminton[edit]

Oceania qualified for one player in the Olympics and the seat was allocated to New Zealand. Indian-born Abhinav Manota was New Zealand's choice for the men's singles as the country's top-ranked badminton player.[86] When the New Zealand Olympic Committee declined the position, the Oceania qualification could not be reassigned within the region, but the seat was instead allocated to the highest-ranked player who had not qualified yet: the Hungarian Gergely Krausz.[87]

Modern pentathlon[edit]

New Zealand qualified one modern pentathlete for the women's event, signifying the country's return to the sport after four decades. Rebecca Jamieson secured her selection as Oceania's top-ranked modern pentathlete at the 2019 Asia & Oceania Championships in Kunming, China.[88] Marina Carrier of Australia came in second and thus did not qualify.[89]

In February 2020, New Zealand declined its quota spot. This retrospectively qualified Carrier for the Olympics instead.[90]

See also[edit]

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