Newfield, New Jersey

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Newfield, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Newfield
Map of Newfield highlighted within Gloucester County. Inset: Location of Gloucester County in New Jersey.
Map of Newfield highlighted within Gloucester County. Inset: Location of Gloucester County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Newfield, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Newfield, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°33′03″N 75°00′37″W / 39.550847°N 75.010258°W / 39.550847; -75.010258Coordinates: 39°33′03″N 75°00′37″W / 39.550847°N 75.010258°W / 39.550847; -75.010258[1][2]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Gloucester
Incorporated March 8, 1924
Government[5]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Donald Sullivan (R, term ends December 31, 2018)[3]
 • Clerk Toni Van Camp[4]
Area[1]
 • Total 1.706 sq mi (4.418 km2)
 • Land 1.703 sq mi (4.410 km2)
 • Water 0.003 sq mi (0.008 km2)  0.18%
Area rank 430th of 566 in state
19th of 24 in county[1]
Elevation[6] 118 ft (36 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 1,553
 • Estimate (2014)[10] 1,531
 • Rank 512th of 566 in state
24th of 24 in county[11]
 • Density 912.0/sq mi (352.1/km2)
 • Density rank 397th of 566 in state
15th of 24 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08344[12][13]
Area code(s) 856[14]
FIPS code 3401551390[15][16]
GNIS feature ID 0885319[1][17]
Website www.newfieldboro.org

Newfield is a borough in Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 1,553,[7][8][9] reflecting a decline of 63 (-3.9%) from the 1,616 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 24 (+1.5%) from the 1,592 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

Newfield was formed as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 8, 1924, from portions of Franklin Township, based on the results of a referendum held on April 1, 1924.[19]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 1.706 square miles (4.418 km2), including 1.703 square miles (4.410 km2) of land and 0.003 square miles (0.008 km2) of water (0.18%).[1][2]

The borough borders Franklin Township and Cumberland County.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1930 880
1940 889 1.0%
1950 1,010 13.6%
1960 1,299 28.6%
1970 1,487 14.5%
1980 1,563 5.1%
1990 1,592 1.9%
2000 1,616 1.5%
2010 1,553 −3.9%
Est. 2014 1,531 [10][20] −1.4%
Population sources:
1930-2000[21] 1930[22] 1930-1990[23]
2000[24][25] 2010[7][8][9]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 1,553 people, 579 households, and 452.8 families residing in the borough. The population density was 912.0 per square mile (352.1/km2). There were 626 housing units at an average density of 367.6 per square mile (141.9/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 94.66% (1,470) White, 2.19% (34) Black or African American, 0.26% (4) Native American, 0.32% (5) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.97% (15) from other races, and 1.61% (25) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 6.57% (102) of the population.[7]

There were 579 households, of which 31.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.2% were married couples living together, 12.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.8% were non-families. 18.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.68 and the average family size was 3.03.[7]

In the borough, 23.4% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.0% from 18 to 24, 24.5% from 25 to 44, 31.0% from 45 to 64, and 14.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.5 years. For every 100 females there were 93.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.9 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $60,350 (with a margin of error of +/- $5,077) and the median family income was $67,045 (+/- $11,678). Males had a median income of $45,000 (+/- $6,268) versus $47,000 (+/- $8,386) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $25,924 (+/- $1,886). About 7.8% of families and 8.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.8% of those under age 18 and 6.9% of those age 65 or over.[26]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 1,616 people, 596 households, and 470 families residing in the borough. The population density was 951.1 people per square mile (367.0/km2). There were 620 housing units at an average density of 364.7 per square mile (140.8/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 95.11% White, 1.30% African American, 0.68% Native American, 0.56% Asian, 1.05% from other races, and 1.30% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.84% of the population.[24][25]

There were 596 households out of which 33.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.9% were married couples living together, 9.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.0% were non-families. 17.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.71 and the average family size was 3.04.[24][25]

In the borough the population was spread out with 24.4% under the age of 18, 7.2% from 18 to 24, 28.9% from 25 to 44, 25.3% from 45 to 64, and 14.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 85.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.8 males.[24][25]

The median income for a household in the borough was $51,875, and the median income for a family was $59,934. Males had a median income of $39,926 versus $28,750 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $21,063. About 5.5% of families and 6.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.8% of those under age 18 and 6.1% of those age 65 or over.[24][25]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Newfield is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[5] The Borough form of government used by Newfield, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[27][28]

As of 2015, the Mayor of Newfield Borough is Republican Donald Sullivan, whose term of office ends December 31, 2018.[29] Members of the Newfield Borough Council (with party affiliation, term-end year and committee assignment listed in parentheses) are Council President Michael Carrow (R, 2017; Public Works),[30] Beverly Davis (R, 2017; Economic Development), Scott M. Miller (D, 2015; Licenses and Inspection), Patricia M. Purdy (D, 2015; Communication and Technology) and Donald Sullivan (R, 2013; Public Safety) and Rachel Zaccaria (D, 2017).[31][32][33][34][35][36]

Resident committees were formed in September 2013, which announced that they would mount a petition drive to recall council members Michael Carrow and Everett Marshall, III, in the wake of a conflict between the borough council and the volunteer fire department, in which the council passed an ordinance giving the borough control over the fire department and in response the fire company threatened to close in October if the ordinance wasn't overturned.[37]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Newfield is located in the 2nd Congressional District[38] and is part of New Jersey's 3rd state legislative district.[8][39][40] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Newfield had been in the 4th state legislative district.[41]

New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Frank LoBiondo (R, Ventnor City).[42] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021)[43] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).[44][45]

The 3rd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Stephen M. Sweeney (D, West Deptford Township) and in the General Assembly by John J. Burzichelli (D, Paulsboro) and Celeste Riley (D, Bridgeton).[46] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[47] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[48]

Gloucester County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose seven members are elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis in partisan elections, with two or three seats coming up for election each year. At a reorganization meeting held each January, the Board selects a Freeholder Director and a Deputy Freeholder Director from among its members. As of 2014, Gloucester County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Robert M. Damminger (D, West Deptford Township; term ends December 31, 2015),[49] Deputy Freeholder Director Giuseppe "Joe" Chila (D, Woolwich Township; 2015),[50] Lyman J. Barnes (D, Logan Township; 2014),[51] Daniel Christy (D, Washington Township; 2016),[52] Frank J. DiMarco (D, Deptford Township; 2016),[53] Heather Simmons (D, Glassboro; 2014)[54] and Adam Taliaferro (D, Woolwich Township; 2014).[55][56][57][58] Constitutional officers elected countywide are County Clerk James N. Hogan,[59] Surrogate Helene M. Reed (Monroe Township)[60] and Sheriff Carmel Morina (Greenwich Township).[61][62][57]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 1,139 registered voters in Newfield, of which 514 (45.1%) were registered as Democrats, 245 (21.5%) were registered as Republicans and 380 (33.4%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were no voters registered to other parties.[63]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 49.7% of the vote (12,169 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 49.2% (12,050 votes), and other candidates with 1.1% (273 votes), among the 24,648 ballots cast by the township's 35,305 registered voters (156 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 69.8%.[64][65] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 48.9% of the vote (434 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 48.0% (426 votes) and other candidates with 1.9% (17 votes), among the 887 ballots cast by the borough's 1,185 registered voters, for a turnout of 74.9%.[66] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 50.5% of the vote (442 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 47.8% (418 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (8 votes), among the 875 ballots cast by the borough's 1,214 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 72.1.[67]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 66.8% of the vote (362 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 32.3% (175 votes), and other candidates with 0.9% (5 votes), among the 562 ballots cast by the borough's 1,141 registered voters (20 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 49.3%.[68][69] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 44.4% of the vote (283 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 40.8% (260 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 10.2% (65 votes) and other candidates with 1.1% (7 votes), among the 637 ballots cast by the borough's 1,176 registered voters, yielding a 54.2% turnout.[70]

Education[edit]

Newfield is a non-operating school district.[71]

Students in public school for Kindergarten through sixth grade attend the Franklin Township Public Schools, as part of a sending/receiving relationship in which Newfield accounts for about 100 of the nearly 1,400 students in the district.[72]

In June 2009, the New Jersey Department of Education ruled that Newfield could end its relationship with the Buena Regional School District and as of the 2011-12 school year could start sending incoming high school students in grades 7-9 to Delsea Regional High School.[73]

Public school students in Newfield previously attended the schools of the Buena Regional School District as part of a sending/receiving relationship. The district serves students from Buena and Buena Vista Township. Students are sent to the district's high school for ninth through twelfth grades from both Estell Manor City and Weymouth Township as part of sending/receiving relationships with the respective school districts.[74]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 12.06 miles (19.41 km) of roadways, of which 9.67 miles (15.56 km) were maintained by the municipality, 2.27 miles (3.65 km) by Gloucester County and 0.12 miles (0.19 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[75]

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit bus service is available between Millville and Philadelphia on the 408 route.[76][77]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e 2010 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey County Subdivisions, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ 2014 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, as of December 15, 2014. Accessed March 4, 2015. As of date accessed, Joseph Curciois listed as mayor with a term-end year of 2014.
  4. ^ Borough Hall, Borough of Newfield. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 24.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Newfield, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 8, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Newfield borough, Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 2. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Newfield borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014 - 2014 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Newfield, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 28, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Newfield, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 28, 2013.
  15. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed July 14, 2008.
  17. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  18. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  19. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 140. Accessed October 23, 2012.
  20. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  21. ^ Barnett, Bob. "Population Data for Gloucester County Municipalities, 1800 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  22. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 716. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  23. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  24. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Newfield borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  25. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Newfield borough, Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  26. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Newfield borough, Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  27. ^ Cerra, Michael F. "Forms of Government: Everything You've Always Wanted to Know, But Were Afraid to Ask", New Jersey State League of Municipalities. Accessed November 30, 2014.
  28. ^ "Forms of Municipal Government in New Jersey", p. 6. Rutgers University Center for Government Studies. Accessed June 3, 2015.
  29. ^ Mayor, Borough of Newfield. Accessed March 4, 2015. As of date accessed, Joseph Curcio, III, is listed as mayor.
  30. ^ Council President, Borough of Newfield. Accessed March 4, 2015.
  31. ^ Mayor & Council, Borough of Newfield. Accessed March 4, 2015, As of datee accessed, 2014 members are still listed.
  32. ^ 2013 Municipal Data Sheet, Borough of Newfield. Accessed October 25, 2013.
  33. ^ Staff. "Gloucester County election results", South Jersey Times, November 6, 2012. Accessed October 25, 2013.
  34. ^ Barna, John. "Republicans gain five local government seats in Gloucester County", Gloucester County Times, November 8, 2011. Accessed October 25, 2013."NEWFIELD - Republican incumbent Michael Carrow (261) and independent incumbent Everett Marshall (244) defeated Democrat Dennis M. Vilimas (174) for two open council seats."
  35. ^ Barna, John. "Gloucester County municipal election results", Gloucester County Times, November 3, 2010. Accessed October 25, 2013. "NEWFIELD - Republican incumbent Joseph J. Curcio III (447) was unopposed for a four-year term as mayor. Democrat incumbent Franklin E. Martinelli (384) and Republican incumbent Donald Sullivan (359) defeated Democrat newcomer Dana C. Palma (310) for two open council seats."
  36. ^ Staff. "Gloucester County election results 2014", South Jersey Times, November 4, 2014. Accessed March 4, 2015.
  37. ^ Romalino, Carly Q. "Newfield residents start recall petition to unseat councilmen in fire department feud", South Jersey Times, October 12, 2013. Accessed October 25, 2013. "Residents have launched a campaign to force borough councilman Everett Marshall III and council president Michael Carrow from their posts in light of the council vs. volunteer fire company feud that’s raged on for more than three years.... In the last two months, both parties have continued to squabble in court over an ordinance that transferred control of the fire company’s membership to borough council.The volunteer squad had given the borough an ultimatum — drop allegations against the chief by Oct. 12, or the fire company closes."
  38. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
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  43. ^ About Cory Booker, United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "He now owns a home and lives in Newark's Central Ward community."
  44. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate, January 26, 2015. "He currently lives in Paramus and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
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  49. ^ Robert M. Damminger, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  50. ^ Giuseppe (Joe) Chila, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  51. ^ Lyman Barnes, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  52. ^ Daniel Christy, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  53. ^ Frank J. DiMarco, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  54. ^ Heather Simmons, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  55. ^ Adam J. Taliaferro, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
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  59. ^ James N. Hogan, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  60. ^ Surrogate Helene M. Reed, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  61. ^ Sheriff Carmel M. Morina, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
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  63. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Gloucester, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed November 7, 2012.
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  71. ^ 13 Non-Operating School Districts Eliminated, New Jersey Department of Education press release dated July 1, 2009. Accessed December 26, 2009.
  72. ^ Township of Franklin Public School District 2014 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed March 4, 2015. "The Township of Franklin Public School District, covering 56 square miles, is located in the southeast corner of Gloucester County. Our schools have an enrollment of approximately 1425 and service grades K-6 and a Pre-School Disabilities program. The enrollment includes nearly 100 students from the Newfield School District."
  73. ^ Romalino, Carly. "State OKs Newfield's break with Buena district", Gloucester County Times, June 17, 2009. Accessed June 14, 2012. "The Board of Education here can sever its three-decade tie with Buena Regional School District, New Jersey Commissioner of Education Lucille Davy has ruled. The move will begin in the 2010-11 school year. In a phase-in process, according to Delsea Regional School District Superintendent Frank Borelli, Delsea schools will first accept Newfield students entering grades seven and nine in September 2010. Students entering grades 10, 11 and 12 as of September 2010 would continue to be educated at Buena High School. Newfield children eligible for the sixth grade as of September 2010 would attend a school arranged for by Newfield, presumably the Franklin Township school district, and not Buena Middle School."
  74. ^ Buena Regional School District 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed March 4, 2015. "The Buena Regional Schools offer a Pre-K through Grade 12 learning opportunity for the children of the Buena Vista Township and the Buena Borough communities as well as grade 9 through 12 experiences for the students of Estell Manor and Weymouth Townships."
  75. ^ Gloucester County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  76. ^ Gloucester County Bus / Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 26, 2010. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  77. ^ South Jersey Transit Guide, Cross County Connection, as of April 1, 2010. Accessed October 12, 2014.

External links[edit]