Newisys

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Newisys was an American technology company. At various times it sold computers for data centers (known as servers), and computer data storage products. It operated as a subsidiary of Sanmina Corporation since 2004.

History[edit]

Newisys was founded in July 2000 by Claymon A. Cipione and Phillip Doyce Hester, both from IBM. It was originally based in Austin, Texas. By the end of 2000, almost $28 million in venture capital funding was obtained from New Enterprise Associates, Austin Ventures, and Advanced Micro Devices (AMD).[1] By 2002, they gave demonstrations of server using 64-bit AMD processors.[2] Another round of about $23 million funding was announced in November 2002,[3] increased to $25 million in February 2003.[4] In July 2003, Sanmina-SCI (which had been a manufacturing partner) announced it would acquire Newisys for an undisclosed amount.[5] Newisys became a original design manufacturer for Sanminia. In 2005, Hester left to become the chief technical officer of AMD until 2008,[6] and Cipione also left to join AMD to become chief information officer.[7][8]

In August 2005, a network-attached storage server product called the NA-1400 was announced, although shipments were reported to be delayed. It used an XScale 80219 processor from Intel.[9] In November 2005, Newisys announced an integrated circuit call the AMD Horus, which allowed servers to be built with large numbers of AMD Opteron processors.[10][11] In January 2006, the company acquired the block storage division of Adaptec, located in Colorado Springs, Colorado.[12] In May 2007, the server portion of the company was shut down, leaving storage (developed in Colorado) as the main focus.[13][14]

Newisys returned to the server market in 2013 by adding Intel based servers into their storage products.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Matt Hudgins (November 18, 2001). "Stealth company coming into open: Newly funded with $27.9M, Newisys Inc. takes 30,000 s.f.". Austin Business Journal. Retrieved November 11, 2016. 
  2. ^ Deni Connor (August 19, 2002). "Start-up to ease move to 64-bit". Network World. Retrieved November 11, 2016. 
  3. ^ "Form D: Notice of Sale of Securities" (PDF). US SEC. November 23, 2002. Retrieved November 11, 2016. 
  4. ^ "Form D: Notice of Sale of Securities" (PDF). US SEC. February 13, 2003. Retrieved November 11, 2016. 
  5. ^ Tony Smith (July 17, 2003). "Sanmina buys Newisys: Rescue bid touted as strategic acquisition?". The Register. Retrieved November 11, 2016. 
  6. ^ Cade Metz (April 11, 2008). "AMD evaporates CTO post: Hester out. No one in". The Register. Retrieved November 11, 2016. 
  7. ^ Jan Buchholz (July 25, 2014). "See sprawling Lake Travis mansion set for August auction; no minimum bid". Austin Business Journal. Retrieved November 11, 2016. 
  8. ^ Scott M. Fulton, III (March 11, 2008). "AMD appoints a former Dell exec as CIO". Beta News. Retrieved November 11, 2016. 
  9. ^ "Newisys NA-1400". November 5, 2005. Archived from the original on January 14, 2006. Retrieved November 11, 2016. 
  10. ^ Klaus Fehrle (November 14, 2005). "Newisys to show off Opteron Horus today: SMP that's the one for me". The Inquirer. Retrieved November 11, 2016. 
  11. ^ Rajesh Kota. "HORUS: Large Scale SMP using AMD Opteron processors" (PDF). HyperTransport Consortium. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 13, 2006. Retrieved November 11, 2016. 
  12. ^ "Adaptec Announces Sale of Its Block-Based Systems Assets and Colorado-Based Technology Center to Newisys, a Sanmina-SCI Company". Press release. Adaptec. January 31, 2006. Retrieved November 11, 2016. 
  13. ^ Charlie Demerjian (May 9, 2007). "Newisys cuts staff: More than half yesterday". The Inquirer. Archived from the original on November 11, 2016. Retrieved November 11, 2016. 
  14. ^ Ashlee Vance (June 20, 2007). "AOpteron darling Newisys lives!: Just a flesh wound". The Register. Retrieved November 11, 2016.