Preservation Society of Newport County

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The largest of the Preservation Society's mansions, The Breakers

The Preservation Society of Newport County is a private, non-profit organization based in Newport, Rhode Island. It is Rhode Island's largest and most-visited cultural organization. The organization protects the architectural heritage of Newport County, especially the Bellevue Avenue Historic District. Seven of its 14 historic properties and landscapes are National Historic Landmarks, and most are open to the public.

History[edit]

The Preservation Society's administrative offices are located in the Osgood-Pell House

The Preservation Society of Newport County was founded in 1945 by a group of Newport residents led by Katherine and George Warren to save Hunter House from demolition. They were known as the Georgian Society until they changed their name to the Preservation Society of Newport County.

Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt, Harold Stirling Vanderbilt's widow, bequeathed $1.25 million to the society upon her death in 1978.[1]

Properties open to the public[edit]

Image Name Year built
(*circa)
Style Architect Refs
ArnoldBuryingGround.sign.jpg
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Arnold Burying Ground Founded 1675 Cemetery
The Breakers, exterior ii.jpg
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The Breakers 1895 Neo Italian Renaissance Richard Morris Hunt [2]
Chateau-sur-Mer, Newport, Rhode Island.jpg
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Chateau-sur-Mer 1852 (remodeled 1870s) Seth C. Bradford (construction)
Richard Morris Hunt (renovations)
Ogden Codman, Jr. (design)
[3]
Chepstow mansion in Newport, Rhode Island.jpg
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Chepstow 1860 Italianate George Champlin Mason Sr.
John Grovesnor (1978 addition)
The Elms - Rhode Island.jpg
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The Elms 1901 Classical Revival Horace Trumbauer [4][5]
Brayton House at Green Animals Topiary Garden in Portsmouth Rhode Island Preservation Society of Newport County.jpg
Green Animals Topiary Garden c. 1860 Victorian Joseph Carreiro, George Mendonca (Gardeners) [6]
Hunter House, Newport, RI edit1.jpg
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Hunter House 1748–1754 Georgian
Isaac Bell House 2018-06-13.jpg
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Isaac Bell House 1883 Shingle style McKim, Mead and White
Kingscote 02.jpg
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Kingscote 1839 (remodeled 1870s, remodeled 1880s) Gothic Revival Richard Upjohn
George C. Mason (1870s renovation)
McKim, Mead and White (1880s renovation)
[7]
Marble House, Newport RI
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Marble House 1892 Beaux-Arts Richard Morris Hunt [8][9]
Rosecliff (1308020662).jpg
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Rosecliff 1902 French Baroque Revival McKim, Mead & White [10]

Former properties[edit]

Image Name Year built
(*circa)
Style Architect Notes
Malbone Castle from the East.jpg
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Malbone Castle 1849 (remodeled 1875) Gothic Revival Alexander Jackson Davis
Dudley Newton (renovations}
Bequeathed to the PSNC in 1978, later sold as a private residence; not open to the public[11][12]
The White Horse Tavern Newport Rhode Island est. 1673.jpg
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White Horse Tavern 1652–1673 Francis Brinley, William Mayes Restored by the PSNC in 1952, but now privately owned and operated as a working tavern

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Vanderbilt will". Democrat and Chronicle. Rochester, New York. August 19, 1978. p. 13. Retrieved June 15, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.
  2. ^ "Breakers, The". National Historic Landmark summary listing. National Park Service. Archived from the original on August 12, 2009. Retrieved June 28, 2008.
  3. ^ "Chateau-sur-Mer". National Historic Landmark summary listing. National Park Service. Archived from the original on 2009-08-12. Retrieved 2008-02-21.
  4. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. January 23, 2007.
  5. ^ "Elms, The". National Historic Landmark summary listing. National Park Service. Archived from the original on 2009-08-12. Retrieved 2008-06-28.
  6. ^ "Green Animals Topiary Garden". www.newportmansions.org. Newport Mansions. Retrieved 19 March 2021.
  7. ^ "Kingscote". National Historic Landmark summary listing. National Park Service. Archived from the original on 2009-08-12. Retrieved 2008-06-28.
  8. ^ "Marble House". National Historic Landmark summary listing. National Park Service. Archived from the original on August 12, 2009. Retrieved December 12, 2012.
  9. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. July 9, 2010.
  10. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. March 13, 2009.
  11. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. January 23, 2007.
  12. ^ ""Malbone" (J. Prescott Hall-Henry Bedlow House)" (PDF). loc.gov. Historic American Buildings Survey National Park Service Department of the Interior. Retrieved 20 November 2019.

External links[edit]