Newton, Kansas

Coordinates: 38°02′14″N 97°20′42″W / 38.03722°N 97.34500°W / 38.03722; -97.34500
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Newton, Kansas
Newton City Hall at 201 E 6th St (2006)
Newton City Hall at 201 E 6th St (2006)
Flag of Newton, Kansas
Location within Harvey County and Kansas
Location within Harvey County and Kansas
KDOT map of Harvey County (legend)
Coordinates: 38°02′14″N 97°20′42″W / 38.03722°N 97.34500°W / 38.03722; -97.34500[1]
CountryUnited States
StateKansas
CountyHarvey
TownshipNewton
Founded1871
Incorporated1872, 1880
Named forNewton, Massachusetts
Government
 • MayorLeroy Koehn[citation needed]
 • City ManagerKelly McElroy[citation needed]
Area
 • Total14.57 sq mi (37.73 km2)
 • Land14.57 sq mi (37.73 km2)
 • Water0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)
Elevation1,434 ft (437 m)
Population
 • Total18,602
 • Density1,300/sq mi (490/km2)
Time zoneUTC-6 (CST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP code
67114
Area code316
FIPS code20-50475 [1]
GNIS ID485629[1]
Websitenewtonkansas.com

Newton is a city in and the county seat of Harvey County, Kansas, United States.[1] As of the 2020 census, the population of the city was 18,602.[3][4] Newton is located 25 miles (40 km) north of Wichita. The city of North Newton is located immediately north and exists as a separate political entity. Newton is located at the intersection of Interstate 135, U.S. Route 50, and U.S. Route 81 highways.

History[edit]

19th century[edit]

1915 Railroad Map of Harvey County
1905 Warkentin Mill

For millennia, the land now known as Kansas was inhabited by Native Americans. In 1803, most of modern Kansas was secured by the United States as part of the Louisiana Purchase. In 1854, the Kansas Territory was organized, then in 1861 Kansas became the 34th U.S. state. In 1872, Harvey County was founded.

In 1871, the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway extended a main line from Emporia westward to Newton by July 1871.[5] The town soon became an important railroad shipping point of Texas cattle.[6]

The city was founded in 1871 and named after Newton, Massachusetts, home of some of the Santa Fe stockholders.[7]

In August 1871, there was a Gunfight at Hide Park, in which a total of eight men were killed. The incident began with an argument between two local lawmen, Billy Bailey and Mike McCluskie. Because of this incident, Newton became known as "bloody and lawless—the wickedest city in the west.".[8]

In 1872, the western terminal for the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway and the railhead for the Chisholm Trail were established here. Shortly after incorporation of the city in 1872, the Newton city council passed an ordinance prohibiting the running at large of buffalo and other wild animals.[9]

20th century[edit]

View of the main street, 1920s

During World War II, the Newton airport was taken over by the US Navy as a secondary Naval Air Station, and the main runway was extended to over 7,000 feet (2,100 m).

Newton served as the Middle Division dispatching headquarters for the "Santa Fe" until the mid-1980s, when all dispatching for the Chicago to Los Angeles system was centralized in the Chicago area. In 1995, the Santa Fe merged with the Burlington Northern Railroad, and is now known as the BNSF Railway. The BNSF continues to be a large industrial taxpayer although its impact as an employer has decreased in the past decade.

21st century[edit]

On February 25, 2016, Newton was the site of the first of several related shooting incidents, which culminated in a mass shooting at an Excel Industries building in nearby Hesston that left three people dead and twelve others injured.[10][11] The shooter, identified as Excel employee Cedric Larry Ford, was then killed by a responding police officer.[12][13]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 12.60 square miles (32.63 km2), all of it land.[14]

The city is in the central portion of the continental United States. U.S. Highway 81, also known as the Meridian Highway, stretches from Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada to Mexico City, Mexico through Central and South America. It passes through Newton, Kansas and is known as "Main Street." U.S. Highway 50 runs past the White House in Washington, DC through Newton, Kansas and continues on to Sacramento, California.

Climate[edit]

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Newton has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.[15]

Climate data for Newton, Kansas, 1991–2020 normals, extremes 1897–present
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 75
(24)
85
(29)
93
(34)
97
(36)
103
(39)
112
(44)
117
(47)
115
(46)
108
(42)
98
(37)
88
(31)
81
(27)
117
(47)
Mean maximum °F (°C) 64.5
(18.1)
70.0
(21.1)
78.9
(26.1)
85.2
(29.6)
92.3
(33.5)
97.9
(36.6)
103.2
(39.6)
101.8
(38.8)
96.9
(36.1)
88.7
(31.5)
74.9
(23.8)
64.3
(17.9)
104.4
(40.2)
Mean daily maximum °F (°C) 41.7
(5.4)
46.6
(8.1)
57.3
(14.1)
66.9
(19.4)
76.3
(24.6)
87.0
(30.6)
92.0
(33.3)
90.3
(32.4)
82.5
(28.1)
69.7
(20.9)
55.7
(13.2)
43.9
(6.6)
67.5
(19.7)
Daily mean °F (°C) 31.0
(−0.6)
35.2
(1.8)
45.2
(7.3)
54.9
(12.7)
65.5
(18.6)
76.0
(24.4)
80.9
(27.2)
79.0
(26.1)
70.7
(21.5)
57.7
(14.3)
44.4
(6.9)
33.9
(1.1)
56.2
(13.4)
Mean daily minimum °F (°C) 20.3
(−6.5)
23.8
(−4.6)
33.1
(0.6)
42.9
(6.1)
54.7
(12.6)
65.0
(18.3)
69.8
(21.0)
67.6
(19.8)
59.0
(15.0)
45.7
(7.6)
33.2
(0.7)
23.9
(−4.5)
44.9
(7.2)
Mean minimum °F (°C) 2.8
(−16.2)
6.3
(−14.3)
15.1
(−9.4)
26.7
(−2.9)
39.4
(4.1)
52.3
(11.3)
59.3
(15.2)
56.8
(13.8)
43.0
(6.1)
28.6
(−1.9)
16.2
(−8.8)
7.0
(−13.9)
−1.5
(−18.6)
Record low °F (°C) −20
(−29)
−28
(−33)
−7
(−22)
10
(−12)
23
(−5)
40
(4)
43
(6)
43
(6)
29
(−2)
10
(−12)
−4
(−20)
−20
(−29)
−28
(−33)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 0.80
(20)
1.25
(32)
2.38
(60)
2.92
(74)
4.89
(124)
5.01
(127)
4.20
(107)
3.89
(99)
2.98
(76)
2.64
(67)
1.65
(42)
1.16
(29)
33.77
(857)
Average snowfall inches (cm) 2.1
(5.3)
1.3
(3.3)
1.2
(3.0)
0.3
(0.76)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.1
(0.25)
0.6
(1.5)
3.2
(8.1)
8.8
(22.21)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in) 4.2 4.8 7.1 7.7 9.7 8.5 8.3 7.8 6.4 6.6 4.9 5.0 81.0
Average snowy days (≥ 0.1 in) 1.6 1.4 0.6 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.4 1.5 5.8
Source 1: NOAA[16]
Source 2: National Weather Service[17]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
CensusPop.Note
18802,601
18905,605115.5%
19006,20810.8%
19107,86226.6%
19209,78124.4%
193011,03412.8%
194011,0480.1%
195011,5904.9%
196014,87728.4%
197015,4393.8%
198016,3325.8%
199016,7002.3%
200017,1902.9%
201019,13211.3%
202018,602−2.8%
U.S. Decennial Census[18]
2010-2020[4]

Newton is included in the Wichita metropolitan statistical area (MSA). It is located in Harvey County which is an agricultural and small manufacturing county with 34,361 people. Harvey County Kansas is part of a 5 county Metro Area with 650,000 people, the largest anchored in the state of Kansas. The major city in this metro area is Wichita, Kansas, 20 miles (20 minutes) to the South via I-135.

2020 census[edit]

The 2020 United States census counted 18,602 people, 7,501 households, and 4,798 families in Newton.[19][20] The population density was 1,276.4 per square mile (492.8/km2). There were 8,256 housing units at an average density of 566.5 per square mile (218.7/km2).[20][21] The racial makeup was 78.79% (14,657) white or European American (73.12% non-Hispanic white), 2.53% (471) black or African-American, 1.01% (188) Native American or Alaska Native, 0.88% (164) Asian, 0.02% (4) Pacific Islander or Native Hawaiian, 6.72% (1,250) from other races, and 10.04% (1,868) from two or more races.[22] Hispanic or Latino of any race was 17.77% (3,306) of the population.[23]

Of the 7,501 households, 29.4% had children under the age of 18; 47.2% were married couples living together; 27.2% had a female householder with no spouse or partner present. 31.1% of households consisted of individuals and 13.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older.[20] The average household size was 2.4 and the average family size was 3.0.[24] The percent of those with a bachelor’s degree or higher was estimated to be 21.5% of the population.[25]

24.1% of the population was under the age of 18, 8.2% from 18 to 24, 24.6% from 25 to 44, 23.8% from 45 to 64, and 19.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39.2 years. For every 100 females, there were 103.9 males.[20] For every 100 females ages 18 and older, there were 106.8 males.[20]

The 2016-2020 5-year American Community Survey estimates show that the median household income was $56,729 (with a margin of error of +/- $2,501) and the median family income was $66,806 (+/- $5,072).[26] Males had a median income of $41,413 (+/- $3,677) versus $29,782 (+/- $3,872) for females. The median income for those above 16 years old was $35,192 (+/- $2,644).[27] Approximately, 6.7% of families and 10.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.7% of those under the age of 18 and 9.4% of those ages 65 or over.[28][29]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[30] of 2010, there were 19,132 people, 7,584 households, and 5,045 families living in the city.[31] The population density was 1,518.4 inhabitants per square mile (586.3/km2). There were 8,237 housing units at an average density of 653.7 per square mile (252.4/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 88.4% White, 2.2% African American, 0.9% Native American, 0.8% Asian, 4.7% from other races, and 2.9% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 16.3% of the population.

There were 7,584 households, of which 33.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.5% were married couples living together, 10.3% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.7% had a male householder with no wife present, and 33.5% were non-families. 29.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 3.01.

The median age in the city was 36.8 years. 26.4% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.9% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 24.9% were from 25 to 44; 25% were from 45 to 64; and 15.9% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.4% male and 51.6% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[32] of 2000, there were 17,190 people, 6,851 households, and 4,610 families living in the city. The population density was 1,794.0 inhabitants per square mile (692.7/km2). There were 7,277 housing units at an average density of 759.5 per square mile (293.2/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 86.73% White, 2.30% African American, 0.53% Native American, 0.66% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 6.84% from other races, and 2.92% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 12.73% of the population.

There were 6,851 households, out of which 31.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.2% were married couples living together, 9.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.7% were non-families. 28.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.43 and the average family size was 2.99.

In the city, the population had 26.3% under the age of 18, 8.1% from 18 to 24, 28.2% from 25 to 44, 20.8% from 45 to 64, and 16.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females, there were 93.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.1 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $38,236, and the median income for a family was $45,703. Males had a median income of $32,308 versus $21,906 for females. The per capita income for the city was $18,529. About 5.1% of families and 7.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.7% of those under age 18 and 5.6% of those age 65 or over.

Area attractions[edit]

1886 Warkentin House (2007)
Former Newton Carnegie Library, now Harvey County Historical Society Library and Museum (1912 postcard)

Education[edit]

Newton High School (2006)

Primary and secondary education[edit]

The community is served by Newton USD 373 public school district. Newton public schools consist of:

High school
Intermediate schools
  • Santa Fe 5/6 Center.
  • Chisholm Middle School.
Elementary
  • Northridge Elementary.
  • Slate Creek Elementary.
  • South Breeze Elementary.
  • Sunset Elementary.
Early education
  • Cooper Early Education
Private

Newton has two K-8 private schools:

  • St. Mary's Catholic School.[38]
  • Newton Bible Christian School.[39]

College[edit]

Media[edit]

Railroad Savings and Loan Building. Across street from rail depot. (2018)

Print media[edit]

The Newton Kansan (GateHouse Media) serves Newton and the surrounding area as the daily local newspaper. It is not published on Sundays or Mondays. The Wichita Eagle is the major newspaper for the region. Harvey County Now newspaper is also based in Newton and covers Harvey County.

Radio[edit]

Television[edit]

Newton is served by over-the-air ATSC digital TV of the Wichita-Hutchinson viewing market area,[40] cable TV by Cox Communications, and satellite TV. See Media in Wichita, Kansas.

Infrastructure[edit]

Transportation[edit]

Newton Amtrak Depot at 414 N. Main St. (2006)
Downtown Newton (looking north). Depot on right. (2006)
An Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway route map from 1891 issue of Grain Dealers and Shippers Gazetteer.

BNSF Railway passes through Newton for transportation and shipping. Amtrak's Southwest Chief stops in Newton twice each day and provides passenger rail service towards Los Angeles and Chicago.[41] The Amtrak station is located at 414 N Main St.[42]

Bus service is provided daily towards Wichita and Salina by BeeLine Express (subcontractor of Greyhound Lines).[43][44] While there is no local fixed-route transit service, Harvey Interurban provides dial-a-ride transit service to the community.[45]

Major roads that pass through Newton are I-135, US-50, US-81, K-15.

Newton City/County Airport, FAA:EWK,[46] is located 2 miles east of Newton. Its 7,002-foot (2,134 m) runway is one of only 11 runways in Kansas 7,000-foot (2,100 m) or longer. It has ILS and GPS approach.[47][48]

Utilities[edit]

Notable people[edit]

See also List of people from Harvey County, Kansas

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Newton, Kansas
  2. ^ "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 24, 2020.
  3. ^ a b "Profile of Newton, Kansas in 2020". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  4. ^ a b c "QuickFacts; Newton, Kansas; Population, Census, 2020 & 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on August 24, 2021. Retrieved August 24, 2021.
  5. ^ Santa Fe Rail History
  6. ^ Blackmar, Frank Wilson (1912). Kansas: A Cyclopedia of State History, Volume 2. Standard Publishing Company. pp. 367.
  7. ^ "Harvey County History". Archived from the original on February 7, 2012. Retrieved April 2, 2012.
  8. ^ Smith, Jessica (2013). "Morality and Money: A Look at how the Respectable Community Battled the Sporting Community over Prostitution in Kansas Cowtowns, 1867-1885" (PDF). Kansas State University.
  9. ^ Route of the Chisholm cattle trail in Kansas; Kansas Historical Society, 1960s.
  10. ^ "Excel Industries shooter identified as Cedric Ford". KWCH. February 25, 2016. Archived from the original on February 26, 2016. Retrieved February 25, 2016.
  11. ^ Berman, Mark; Miller, Michael E. (February 25, 2016). "Kansas gunman kills three people and injures 14 people, sheriff says". The Washington Post. Retrieved February 25, 2016.
  12. ^ "Gunman Among 4 Dead, 14 Hurt in Kansas Workplace Shooting". NBC New York. February 25, 2016. Retrieved February 25, 2016.
  13. ^ Eversley, Melanie (February 25, 2016). "Multiple dead plus shooter after Kansas shootings; up to 20 injured". USA Today. Retrieved February 25, 2016.
  14. ^ "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on January 25, 2012. Retrieved July 6, 2012.
  15. ^ Climate Summary for Newton, Kansas
  16. ^ "U.S. Climate Normals Quick Access – Station: Newton, KS". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved November 20, 2023.
  17. ^ "NOAA Online Weather Data – NWS Wichita". National Weather Service. Retrieved November 20, 2023.
  18. ^ United States Census Bureau. "Census of Population and Housing". Retrieved November 30, 2014.
  19. ^ "US Census Bureau, Table P16: HOUSEHOLD TYPE". data.census.gov. Retrieved January 3, 2024.
  20. ^ a b c d e "US Census Bureau, Table DP1: PROFILE OF GENERAL POPULATION AND HOUSING CHARACTERISTICS". data.census.gov. Retrieved January 3, 2024.
  21. ^ Bureau, US Census. "Gazetteer Files". Census.gov. Retrieved December 30, 2023.
  22. ^ "US Census Bureau, Table P1: RACE". data.census.gov. Retrieved January 3, 2024.
  23. ^ "US Census Bureau, Table P2: HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE". data.census.gov. Retrieved January 3, 2024.
  24. ^ "US Census Bureau, Table S1101: HOUSEHOLDS AND FAMILIES". data.census.gov. Retrieved January 3, 2024.
  25. ^ "US Census Bureau, Table S1501: EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT". data.census.gov. Retrieved January 3, 2024.
  26. ^ "US Census Bureau, Table S1903: MEDIAN INCOME IN THE PAST 12 MONTHS (IN 2020 INFLATION-ADJUSTED DOLLARS)". data.census.gov. Retrieved January 3, 2024.
  27. ^ "US Census Bureau, Table S2001: EARNINGS IN THE PAST 12 MONTHS (IN 2020 INFLATION-ADJUSTED DOLLARS)". data.census.gov. Retrieved January 3, 2024.
  28. ^ "US Census Bureau, Table S1701: POVERTY STATUS IN THE PAST 12 MONTHS". data.census.gov. Retrieved January 3, 2024.
  29. ^ "US Census Bureau, Table S1702: POVERTY STATUS IN THE PAST 12 MONTHS OF FAMILIES". data.census.gov. Retrieved January 3, 2024.
  30. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 6, 2012.
  31. ^ "2010 City Population and Housing Occupancy Status". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved March 6, 2011.[dead link]
  32. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  33. ^ Harvey County Historical Society Library and Museum
  34. ^ Kauffman Museum
  35. ^ [1]
  36. ^ Carriage Factory Art Gallery
  37. ^ Sand Creek Station Golf Course
  38. ^ St. Mary's Catholic School
  39. ^ Newton Bible Christian School.
  40. ^ Wichita-Hutchinson TV market.
  41. ^ Amtrak - Southwest Chief route
  42. ^ Amtrak - Newton Station
  43. ^ BeeLine Express
  44. ^ "Greyhound Lines". Archived from the original on September 6, 2019. Retrieved January 3, 2016.
  45. ^ "Interurban Transportation". Retrieved July 21, 2023.
  46. ^ Newton City/County Airport map
  47. ^ "Newton City/County Airport web site". Archived from the original on January 3, 2011. Retrieved July 27, 2010.
  48. ^ Newton City/County Airport information
  49. ^ Basketball Hall Of Fame - Harold E. Foster Archived 2013-11-01 at the Wayback Machine
  50. ^ "Kansans in U.S. House - Kansapedia - Kansas Historical Society".

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

City
Historical
Maps