Newton Exchange

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Newton Exchange
Newtonexch72.JPG
Location 72nd Avenue, Surrey
British Columbia, Canada
Coordinates 49°08′00″N 122°50′32″W / 49.13333°N 122.84222°W / 49.13333; -122.84222Coordinates: 49°08′00″N 122°50′32″W / 49.13333°N 122.84222°W / 49.13333; -122.84222
Operated by TransLink
Bus routes 12
Bus stands 10
Bus operators Coast Mountain Bus Company
Connections Translinkbus.svg 96 B-Line
Other information
Fare zone 3
History
Opened May 30, 1975

Newton Exchange is a bus loop and transit exchange in Surrey, British Columbia. Opened on May 30, 1975, it is the central transit hub for Newton Town Centre.[1] Part of the TransLink system, it is the terminus of buses serving Surrey, White Rock, Delta, and Richmond.

Structure and location[edit]

The exchange is on the southeast corner of 72nd Avenue and 137th Street; it has a loop layout, with several shelters. It is adjacent to the Newton Wave Pool. There are also several shopping malls very close, as well as a cinema, civic recreation centre, and library. The bus loop is patrolled by the South Coast British Columbia Transportation Authority Police Service.

Routes[edit]

Route # Destinations Notes
96 B-Line Guildford
  • Express Bus
301 Brighouse Station
  • Express Bus
319 Scott Road Station
via Scottsdale Exchange
321 Surrey Central Station
via King George Boulevard
White Rock Centre
White Rock South
King George at 11th Ave.
  • Regular weekday routing is between Newton Exchange and Surrey Central Station with alternate trips operating to White Rock Centre
  • Some early morning and late night trips extend to White Rock South
323 Surrey Central Station
via 128 Street
324 Surrey Central Station
via 132 Street
325 Surrey Central Station
via 140 Street
335 Surrey Central Station
via Guildford Exchange
  • Weekday peak hours only
341 Guildford
342 Langley Centre
393 Surrey Central Station
  • Weekday peak hours only
C75 Scottsdale

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Surrey-Delta-White Rock" (PDF). The Buzzer. British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority. May 23, 1975. Retrieved January 25, 2017. 

External links[edit]