Next Pakistani general election

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Next Pakistani general election

← 2018 on or before 12 October 2023

All 336 seats in the National Assembly
169 seats needed for a majority
  Dmitry Medvedev’s meeting with Prime Minister of Pakistan Imran Khan (cropped, 2).jpg Mian Shehbaz Sharif.JPG Bilawal Bhutto Zardari - 2012 (7268800476) (cropped).jpg
Leader Imran Khan Shehbaz Sharif Bilawal Bhutto Zardari
Party PTI PML (N) PPP
Leader since 25 April 1996 6 March 2018 30 December 2007
Last election 149 seats, 31.82% 82 seats, 24.35% 54 seats, 13.03%
Seats needed Increase 20 Increase 87 Increase 115

Incumbent Prime Minister

Imran Khan
PTI



General elections are scheduled to be held in Pakistan less than 60 days after the dissolution of the National Assembly, which is set to dissolve on 13 August 2023, unless dissolved earlier: in which case the election shall be held within 90 days after dissolution. This means that the election must be held by or before 12 October 2023.[1]

Background[edit]

2018 elections[edit]

Following the elections in 2018, Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf led by former cricket captain of the Pakistan national cricket team Imran Khan emerged as the largest party, winning 149 out of a total of 342 seats in the National Assembly of Pakistan. Despite being short of a majority, Independents and smaller parties such as the MQM-P helped Khan to form a government.[2]

During the election campaign, Pakistan Muslim League (N) (PML (N)) led by former Chief Minister of Punjab Shehbaz Sharif campaigned on a platform of being “victimised by hidden forces”. Despite opinion polls close to the election showing a close contest, the actual result of the election showed the PTI with a lead of over 50 seats on the PML-N in the directly elected seats, and also gave it a lead of around 7.5 percentage points, despite polls suggesting it only had a lead of up to 4 percentage points. The PML-N was deprived of the chance of forming a government in Punjab, a province seen as it’s stronghold.[3]

Most parties apart from the PTI cried foul at the result and claimed that it was rigged.[4]

Electoral system[edit]

The 342 seats of the National Assembly consist of 272 elected by first-past-the-post voting in single-member constituencies,[5] 60 seats are reserved for women and 10 for minority groups. The reserved seats are elected by proportional representation based on the national vote share in the single-member constituencies with a 5% electoral threshold.[6] As a result of the Twenty-fifth Amendment to the Constitution of Pakistan, six seats will be removed from the former Federally Administered Tribal Areas, bringing the total membership of the House down from 342 to 336.

Opinion polls[edit]

Nationwide Voting Intention[edit]

Date Pollster Publisher Sample PTI PML-N PPP MMA TLP Others Lead
22 Nov 2018 IPOR[7] IRI 3,991 34% 21% 12% 1% 1% 31% 13%
25 July 2018 Election 2018 ECP 53,123,733 31.82% 24.35% 13.01% 4.85% 4.21% 21.76% 7.47%

Government Approval Rating[edit]

Date Pollster Publisher Sample Approve (Satisfied) Disapprove (Dissatisfied) Net Strongly Approve Approve Disapprove Strongly Disapprove
29 Dec 2018 Gallup Pakistan[8] Self 1,141 51% 46% 5% 13% 38% 26% 20%
01 Dec 2018 IPOR Self 2,041 47% 27% 20% 17% 30% 18% 9%
28 Nov 2018 Pulse Consultant[9] Geo News 2,019 51% 30% 21% N/A
22 Nov 2018 IPOR[7] IRI 3,991 57% 39% 18% 17% 40% 28% 11%
56% 40% 16% 16% 40% 28% 12%
03 Sep 2018 Gallup Pakistan[10] Self 1,550 49% 27% 22% N/A

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Constitution of Pakistan, Part VIII: Elections".
  2. ^ "Imran Khan elected as Pakistan's prime minister". www.aljazeera.com.
  3. ^ Butt, Shafiq (2 May 2018). "PML-N to compete against 'hidden forces' in elections: Nawaz".
  4. ^ Amir Wasim, Zulqernain Tahir, with Azfar-ul-Ashfaque (26 July 2018). "PTI delivers knockout punch; six major parties cry foul".CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link)
  5. ^ Electoral system IPU
  6. ^ Pakistan IFES
  7. ^ a b "National Survey of Public Opinion in Pakistan" (PDF). Retrieved 17 March 2019.
  8. ^ http://gallup.com.pk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/25.01.2019-English-1.pdf
  9. ^ "Half the country satisfied during 100 days, satisfaction decreased in Punjab and KP from previous govts". Retrieved 23 March 2019.
  10. ^ http://gallup.com.pk/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/15.11.18-English-4.pdf