Western Australian state election, 2017

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Western Australian state election, 2017
Western Australia
← 2013 11 March 2017 2021 →

All 59 seats in the Western Australian Legislative Assembly
and all 36 members in the Western Australian Legislative Council
30 Assembly seats were needed for a majority
Opinion polls
  First party Second party Third party
  Mark McGowan headshot.jpg Colin Barnett (formal) crop.jpg Brendon Grylls.jpg
Leader Mark McGowan Colin Barnett Brendon Grylls
Party Labor Liberal Nationals WA
Leader since 23 January 2012 (2012-01-23) 6 August 2008 (2008-08-06) 9 August 2016 (2016-08-09)
Leader's seat Rockingham Cottesloe Pilbara (lost seat)
Last election 21 seats 31 seats 7 seats
Seats won 41 seats 13 seats 5 seats
Seat change Increase20 Decrease18 Decrease2
Popular vote 557,794 412,710 71,312
Percentage 42.20% 31.23% 5.40%
Swing Increase9.07 Decrease15.88 Decrease0.66

Premier before election

Colin Barnett
Liberal

Elected Premier

Mark McGowan
Labor

The 2017 Western Australian state election was held on Saturday 11 March 2017 to elect members to the Parliament of Western Australia, including all 59 seats in the Legislative Assembly and all 36 seats in the Legislative Council. The eight-and-a-half-year two-term incumbent LiberalWA National government, led by Premier Colin Barnett, was defeated by the Labor opposition, led by Opposition Leader Mark McGowan.

Labor won 41 of the 59 seats in the Legislative Assembly—a 12-seat majority. Not only is this WA Labor's strongest performance in a state election, but it is also the largest majority government and seat tally in Western Australian parliamentary history. Additionally, Labor exceeded all published opinion polling, winning 55.5 percent of the two-party-preferred vote from a state record landslide 12.8-point two-party swing.[1][2][3] It is the worst defeat of a sitting government in Western Australia, as well as one of the worst defeats of a sitting state or territory government since Federation.

Labor also became the largest party in the Legislative Council with 14 of the 36 seats. The Labor government will require at least five additional votes from non-government members to pass legislation.[3][4]

Results[edit]

Legislative Assembly[edit]

Western Australian state election, 11 March 2017[1][3][5][6]
Legislative Assembly
<< 20132021 >>

Enrolled voters 1,593,222
Votes cast 1,384,500 Turnout 86.90 −2.31
Informal votes 62,860 Informal 4.54 −1.46
Summary of votes by party
Party Primary votes  % Swing Seats Change
  Labor 557,794 42.20 +9.07 41 +20
  Liberal 412,710 31.23 –15.88 13 –18
  Greens 117,723 8.91 +0.51 0 ±0
  National 71,313 5.40 –0.66 5 –2
  One Nation 65,192 4.93 +4.93 0 ±0
  Christians 27,724 2.10 +0.29 0 ±0
  Shooters, Fishers and Farmers 17,317 1.31 +1.31 0 ±0
  Micro Business 13,211 1.00 +1.00 0 ±0
  Matheson for WA 6,145 0.47 +0.47 0 ±0
  Animal Justice 2,836 0.21 +0.21 0 ±0
  Flux the System! 2,188 0.17 +0.17 0 ±0
  Family First 1,443 0.11 –0.49 0 ±0
  Socialist Alliance 694 0.05 +0.05 0 ±0
  Liberal Democrats 561 0.04 +0.04 0 ±0
  Independent 24,327 1.84 –1.07 0 ±0
  Other 462 0.04 +0.04 0 ±0
Total 1,321,640     59  
Two-party-preferred
  Labor 733,738 55.5 +12.8
  Liberal 587,353 44.5 –12.8

The four main media networks covering the election, the ABC, Sky News, Seven News and Nine News, all called the election for Labor within two hours after polls closed. McGowan succeeded Barnett to become the 30th Premier of Western Australia.[7][8]

By the morning of 12 March, two thirds of votes had been counted and seven lower house seats were still in doubt, showing that Labor had won at least 36 seats, well above the 30 required for a majority, which the ABC predicted would increase to 41. Meanwhile, the Liberals and WA Nationals had won only 10 and five seats respectively, with a further three expected to be retained by the Liberals.[9]

The swing against the government affected traditionally safe seats. Consequently, six government ministers lost their seats in the Legislative Assembly while one lost his seat in the Legislative Council.[10]

The Labor landslide was built primarily on a near-sweep of Perth. Labor took 34 of the capital's 43 seats on a swing of 13.6 points, accounting for nearly all of its majority. By comparison, it had gone into the election holding 17 seats in Perth. According to the ABC's Antony Green, the swing Labor needed to make McGowan premier was not nearly as large as it seemed on paper. Labor theoretically needed a swing of 10 points, but that was mainly because of inflated margins in Liberal-held outer suburban seats.[2]

Seats changing parties[edit]

Seat Pre-2017 Swing Post-2017
Party Member Margin Margin Member Party
Balcatta   Liberal Chris Hatton 7.1 12.9 5.8 David Michael Labor  
Belmont   Liberal Glenys Godfrey 1.0 12.4 11.4 Cassie Rowe Labor  
Bicton   Liberal Matt Taylor1 10.0 13.0 2.9 Lisa O'Malley Labor  
Bunbury   Liberal John Castrilli 12.2 23.0 10.8 Don Punch Labor  
Burns Beach   Liberal Albert Jacob2 11.3 13.9 2.5 Mark Folkard Labor  
Darling Range   Liberal Tony Simpson 13.1 18.9 5.8 Barry Urban Labor  
Forrestfield   Liberal Nathan Morton 2.2 11.6 9.4 Stephen Price Labor  
Jandakot Liberal Joe Francis 18.3 19.4 1.0 Yaz Mubarakai Labor
Joondalup Liberal Jan Norberger 10.4 11.0 0.6 Emily Hamilton Labor
Kalamunda   Liberal John Day 10.3 12.7 2.5 Matthew Hughes Labor  
Kalgoorlie National Wendy Duncan 3.2 n/a 6.2 Kyran O'Donnell Liberal  
Kingsley Liberal Andrea Mitchell 14.0 14.7 0.7 Jessica Stojkovski Labor
Morley   Liberal Ian Britza 4.7 16.2 11.4 Amber-Jade Sanderson Labor  
Mount Lawley   Liberal Michael Sutherland 8.9 12.9 4.0 Simon Millman Labor  
Murray-Wellington Liberal Murray Cowper 12.0 13.4 1.4 Robyn Clarke Labor
Perth   Liberal Eleni Evangel 2.8 14.6 11.8 John Carey Labor  
Pilbara National Brendon Grylls 11.5 13.8 2.3 Kevin Michel Labor  
Southern River   Liberal Peter Abetz 10.9 18.8 7.9 Terry Healy Labor  
Swan Hills   Liberal Frank Alban 3.7 18.3 14.5 Jessica Shaw Labor  
Wanneroo   Liberal Paul Miles 11.0 18.2 7.3 Sabine Winton Labor  
1 Matt Taylor was the member for the seat of Bateman, but contested Bicton after losing preselection to Dean Nalder, the member for the abolished seat of Alfred Cove.
2 Albert Jacob was the member for the abolished seat of Ocean Reef, but instead contested Burns Beach, a seat containing much of the same territory.
  • Members in italics did not contest their seat at this election.
  • Labor also retained two seats—Collie-Preston and West Swan—which were notionally Liberal-held after the redistribution. The Liberals retained Hillarys, which was being contested by the incumbent MLA Rob Johnson as an independent.

Post-election pendulum[edit]

GOVERNMENT SEATS
Marginal
Joondalup Emily Hamilton ALP 0.6
Kingsley Jessica Stojkovski ALP 0.7
Jandakot Yaz Mubarakai ALP 1.0
Murray-Wellington Robyn Clarke ALP 1.4
Pilbara Kevin Michel ALP 2.3
Kalamunda Matthew Hughes ALP 2.5
Burns Beach Mark Folkard ALP 2.5
Bicton Lisa O'Malley ALP 2.9
Mount Lawley Simon Millman ALP 4.0
Albany Peter Watson ALP 5.1
Darling Range Barry Urban ALP 5.8
Balcatta David Michael ALP 5.8
Fairly safe
Baldivis Reece Whitby ALP v IND 7.2
Wanneroo Sabine Winton ALP 7.3
Southern River Terry Healy ALP 7.9
Forrestfield Stephen Price ALP 9.4
Safe
Bunbury Don Punch ALP 10.8
Belmont Cassie Rowe ALP 11.4
Morley Amber-Jade Sanderson ALP 11.4
Perth John Carey ALP 11.8
Kimberley Josie Farrer ALP 13.0
Midland Michelle Roberts ALP 13.0
Swan Hills Jessica Shaw ALP 14.5
Collie Preston Mick Murray ALP 14.7
Willagee Peter Tinley ALP 15.5
Thornlie Chris Tallentire ALP 15.8
Cockburn Fran Logan ALP 15.9
Victoria Park Ben Wyatt ALP 16.5
Girrawheen Margaret Quirk ALP 16.7
West Swan Rita Saffioti ALP 17.1
Maylands Lisa Baker ALP 17.9
Mandurah David Templeman ALP 18.0
Cannington Bill Johnston ALP 18.1
Kwinana Roger Cook ALP 18.1
Mirrabooka Janine Freeman ALP 19.2
Butler John Quigley ALP 19.5
Bassendean Dave Kelly ALP 21.5
Fremantle Simone McGurk ALP 23.1
Rockingham Mark McGowan ALP 23.4
Warnbro Paul Papalia ALP 23.7
Armadale Tony Buti ALP 25.2
NON-GOVERNMENT SEATS
Marginal
Dawesville Zak Kirkup LIB 0.7
Geraldton Ian Blayney LIB 1.3
Hillarys Peter Katsambanis LIB 4.1
Riverton Mike Nahan LIB 4.4
Scarborough Liza Harvey LIB 5.6
Fairly safe
Kalgoorlie Kyran O'Donnell LIB 6.2
South Perth John McGrath LIB 7.1
Nedlands Bill Marmion LIB 8.3
Carine Tony Krsticevic LIB 9.0
Bateman Dean Nalder LIB 9.5
Safe
Churchlands Sean L'Estrange LIB 13.2
Cottesloe Colin Barnett LIB 13.3
Vasse Libby Mettam LIB 14.7
CROSS BENCH SEATS
North West Central Vince Catania NAT v ALP 9.5
Warren-Blackwood Terry Redman NAT v ALP 13.4
Moore Shane Love NAT v LIB 13.9
Roe Peter Rundle NAT v LIB 14.4
Central Wheatbelt Mia Davies NAT v ALP 22.6

Legislative Council[edit]

Western Australian state election, 11 March 2017[11][12]
Legislative Council
<< 20132021 >>

Enrolled voters 1,593,222
Votes cast 1,386,155 Turnout 87.00 −2.26
Informal votes 37,480 Informal 2.70 −0.13
Summary of votes by party
Party Primary votes  % Swing Seats Change
  Labor 544,938 40.41 +7.90 14 +3
  Liberal 360,235 26.71 −20.91 9 –8
  Greens 116,041 8.60 +0.39 4 +2
  One Nation 110,480 8.19 +8.19 3 +3
  National 59,776 4.43 −0.45 4 –1
  Shooters, Fishers and Farmers 31,924 2.37 +0.59 1 ±0
  Christians 26,209 1.94 −0.01 0 ±0
  Liberal Democrats 23,848 1.77 +1.77 1 +1
  Animal Justice 14,838 1.10 +1.10 0 ±0
  Family First 11,279 0.84 −0.53 0 ±0
  Daylight Saving 9,209 0.68 +0.68 0 ±0
  Micro Business 7,484 0.55 +0.55 0 ±0
  Flux the System! 5,934 0.44 +0.44 0 ±0
  Matheson for WA 5,270 0.39 +0.39 0 ±0
  Fluoride Free WA 4,327 0.32 +0.32 0 ±0
  Socialist Alliance 1,367 0.10 +0.10 0 ±0
  Independent 15,516 1.15 −0.53 0 ±0
Total 1,348,675     36  

Labor became the largest party in the Legislative Council with 14 of the 36 seats. The Labor government will require at least five additional votes from non-government members to pass legislation.[4][13]

On 4 April, the Western Australian Electoral Commission conducted a recount of 2013 election results to fill two casual vacancies for the remainder of the 2013–17 term caused by the resignation and subsequent election to the Legislative Assembly of Amber-Jade Sanderson (Labor) in East Metropolitan and Peter Katsambanis (Liberal) in North Metropolitan.[14] The vacancies were filled by Bill Leadbetter (Labor) and Elise Irwin (Liberal), who will first sit in the Legislative Council on 11 May 2017.[15]

Date of election[edit]

Barnaby C, protecting the Carnaby's black cockatoo habitat and an Anti Roe 8 supporter appeared at a number of media events during the election campaign

On 3 November 2011, the Government of Western Australia introduced fixed four-year terms for the Legislative Assembly, with the elections to be held on the second Saturday in March.[16][17][18] The first election under the new law was the 2013 election. Previously, under electoral reforms of the Burke Government in 1987, four-year maximum terms were adopted for the Legislative Assembly, and fixed four-year terms for the Legislative Council.[19]

Seats held[edit]

Lower house[edit]

At the 2013 election, Labor won 21 seats, the Liberals won 31 seats and the Nationals won 7 seats. No seats were won by independents.

On 15 April 2016, the Liberal member for Hillarys, Rob Johnson, resigned from the Liberals to sit as an independent, leaving the government with 30 seats in the lower house.

Upper house[edit]

At the 2013 election, the Liberals won 17 seats, Labor won 11 seats, the Nationals won five seats, the Greens won two seats and the Shooters and Fishers won one seat.

Western Australia's Legislative Council is divided into six regions. Three are based in Perth, while three are rural. Each region elects six members to the Legislative Council. These areas are not of similar population sizes, with rural areas receiving from one and a half to about six times the effective membership of the metropolitan regions.

The Western Australian rural population dropped from about 12.1% to 10.7% of the state's enrolled electors after the 2008 election. Election analyst Antony Green predicted this would make it more difficult for the Liberals or Labor (who typically perform better in Perth than rural areas) to increase their presence within the Legislative Council.[20]

Redistribution[edit]

A redistribution of electoral boundaries for the lower house was completed on 27 November 2015. This resulted in a net gain of one seat for the Liberals from Labor. The Liberal seats of Alfred Cove, Eyre and Ocean Reef, the Labor seat of Gosnells and the National seat of Wagin were abolished. Five new seats were created (or re-created): the notionally Liberal seats of Bicton (mostly replacing Alfred Cove) and Burns Beach (mostly replacing Ocean Reef), the notionally Labor seats of Baldivis (created from parts of Kwinana and Warnbro) and Thornlie (replacing Gosnells), and the notionally National seat of Roe (merging Wagin and Eyre). The Labor seats of Collie-Preston and West Swan became notionally Liberal.[21]

Retiring MPs[edit]

Members who have announced they will not re-nominate at the 2017 election:

Liberal[edit]

National[edit]

Pre-election pendulum[edit]

The following Mackerras Pendulums work by lining up all of the seats according to the percentage point margin post-election on a two-candidate-preferred basis,[28] grouped as marginal, safe etc. as defined by the Australian Electoral Commission.[29]

This pendulum takes the redistribution into account. One sitting member, retiring Wagin Nationals MP Terry Waldron, does not appear in this pendulum: his seat was combined with Eyre to form Roe, a seat with a National margin that will also be contested by Eyre Liberal MP Graham Jacobs, who is listed as the defending member below. Two Liberal members, Dean Nalder (Alfred Cove, now renamed Bicton) and Matt Taylor (Bateman), were contesting each other's seats; this is reflected below. Retiring members are listed in italics.

Liberal/National seats
Marginal
West Swan Rita Saffioti LIB 0.9 ppt
Belmont Glenys Godfrey LIB 1.0 ppt
Forrestfield Nathan Morton LIB 2.2 ppt
Perth Eleni Evangel LIB 2.8 ppt
Collie-Preston Mick Murray LIB 2.9 ppt
Kalgoorlie Wendy Duncan NAT 3.2 ppt v LIB
Swan Hills Frank Alban LIB 3.7 ppt
Morley Ian Britza LIB 4.7 ppt
Moore Shane Love NAT 5.9 ppt v LIB
Fairly safe
Balcatta Chris Hatton LIB 7.1 ppt
Warren-Blackwood Terry Redman NAT 7.2 ppt v LIB
Central Wheatbelt Mia Davies NAT 8.9 ppt v LIB
Mount Lawley Michael Sutherland LIB 8.9 ppt
Safe
Bicton Matt Taylor LIB 10.0 ppt
Kalamunda John Day LIB 10.3 ppt
Joondalup Jan Norberger LIB 10.4 ppt
North West Central Vince Catania NAT 10.5 ppt v LIB
Geraldton Ian Blayney LIB 10.9 ppt v NAT
Southern River Peter Abetz LIB 10.9 ppt
Wanneroo Paul Miles LIB 11.0 ppt
Burns Beach Albert Jacob LIB 11.3 ppt
Pilbara Brendon Grylls NAT 11.5 ppt
Murray-Wellington Murray Cowper LIB 12.0 ppt
Bunbury John Castrilli LIB 12.2 ppt
Riverton Mike Nahan LIB 12.7 ppt
Dawesville Kim Hames LIB 12.7 ppt
Darling Range Tony Simpson LIB 13.1 ppt
Kingsley Andrea Mitchell LIB 14.0 ppt
Hillarys Rob Johnson LIB 16.0 ppt
Roe Graham Jacobs NAT 16.7 ppt v LIB
Scarborough Liza Harvey LIB 17.3 ppt
Jandakot Joe Francis LIB 18.3 ppt
Carine Tony Krsticevic LIB 18.3 ppt
Nedlands Bill Marmion LIB 19.1 ppt
Very safe
Churchlands Sean L'Estrange LIB 20.0 ppt
South Perth John McGrath LIB 20.0 ppt
Cottesloe Colin Barnett LIB 21.1 ppt
Vasse Libby Mettam LIB 21.2 ppt
Bateman Dean Nalder LIB 23.1 ppt
Labor seats
Marginal
Midland Michelle Roberts ALP 0.5 ppt
Butler John Quigley ALP 1.0 ppt
Albany Peter Watson ALP 1.0 ppt
Thornlie Chris Tallentire ALP 1.8 ppt
Cannington Bill Johnston ALP 2.1 ppt
Willagee Peter Tinley ALP 2.5 ppt
Maylands Lisa Baker ALP 2.7 ppt
Girrawheen Margaret Quirk ALP 2.8 ppt
Victoria Park Ben Wyatt ALP 4.0 ppt
Kwinana Roger Cook ALP 4.3 ppt
Cockburn Fran Logan ALP 4.6 ppt
Mirrabooka Janine Freeman ALP 4.6 ppt
Bassendean Dave Kelly ALP 5.1 ppt
Kimberley Josie Farrer ALP 5.1 ppt
Fairly safe
Baldivis new seat ALP 6.4 ppt
Mandurah David Templeman ALP 7.7 ppt
Armadale Tony Buti ALP 9.6 ppt
Safe
Warnbro Paul Papalia ALP 10.6 ppt
Rockingham Mark McGowan ALP 13.2 ppt
Fremantle Simone McGurk ALP 15.4 ppt

Opinion polling[edit]

Legislative Assembly (lower house) polling
Date Firm Primary vote TPP vote
LIB NAT ALP GRN OTH LIB ALP
9 March 2017 ReachTEL[30] 33.9% 6.0% 41.8% 6.5% 11.8% 46% 54%
6–9 March 2017 Newspoll[30] 32% 5% 41% 7% 15% 46% 54%
1–3 March 2017 Galaxy[31] 31% 5% 40% 8% 16% 46% 54%
27 February 2017 ReachTEL[32] 34.6% 6.8% 35.2% 10.7% 12.7% 48% 52%
February 2017 ReachTEL[33] 35.4% 8.4% 35% 6% 15.1% 50% 50%
January 2017 Newspoll[34] 30% 5% 38% 9% 18% 46% 54%
November 2016 Newspoll[35] 34% 6% 41% 9% 10% 48% 52%
October 2016 ReachTEL[36] 35.9% 6.1% 36.7% 7.7% 13.6% 48% 52%
October 2016 Roy Morgan[37] 34% 5% 36.5% 12.5% 12% 47.5% 52.5%
August 2016 Roy Morgan[38] 34.5% 6.5% 35.5% 12.5% 11% 49% 51%
May 2016 Roy Morgan[39] 36.5% 7% 34% 12.5% 10% 51% 49%
Mar–May 2016 Newspoll[40] 40% 42% 11% 7% 46% 54%
March 2016 Roy Morgan[41] 33.5% 8% 37% 14.5% 7% 48% 52%
Mar 2016 ReachTEL[42] 37% 5% 39% 13% 5% 44% 56%
Oct–Dec 2015 Newspoll[43] 37% 5% 42% 10% 6% 47% 53%
9–15 Oct 2015 Morgan[44] 37.5% 4.5% 32% 13% 13% 51.5% 48.5%
28–31 Aug 2015 Morgan 35% 7% 34% 15% 9% 50% 50%
Apr–Jun 2015 Newspoll 33% 7% 33% 14% 13% 48% 52%
Jan–Mar 2015 Newspoll 34% 6% 35% 14% 11% 48% 52%
Oct–Dec 2014 Newspoll 34% 8% 33% 15% 10% 50% 50%
Jul–Sep 2014 Newspoll 35% 6% 31% 15% 13% 50% 50%
Apr–Jun 2014 Newspoll 34% 6% 27% 17% 16% 50% 50%
Oct–Dec 2013 Newspoll 36% 8% 33% 13% 10% 51% 49%
2013 election 47.1% 6.1% 33.1% 8.4% 5.3% 57.3% 42.7%
4–7 Mar 2013 Newspoll 48% 6% 32% 8% 6% 59.5% 40.5%
Better premier polling^
Liberal
Barnett
Labor
McGowan
6–9 Mar 2017[30] 37% 45%
Oct 2016[35] 29% 47%
Oct 2016[37] 41% 59%
Sep 2016 (RM)[38] 43% 57%
Mar–May 2016[40] 32% 46%
Mar 2016 (RT)[42] 39% 61%
Oct–Dec 2015[43] 36% 41%
Apr–Jun 2015 37% 43%
Jan–Mar 2015 38% 44%
Oct–Dec 2014 39% 40%
Jul–Sep 2014 38% 41%
Apr–Jun 2014 36% 43%
Oct–Dec 2013 37% 43%
2013 election
4–7 Mar 2013 52% 31%
Polling conducted by Roy Morgan Research (RM), ReachTEL (RT),
or Newspoll (all others).
^ Remainder were "uncommitted" to either leader.
Satisfaction polling^
Barnett McGowan
Satisfied Dissatisfied Satisfied Dissatisfied
6–9 Mar 2017[30] 34% 57% 45% 40%
Nov 2016[35] 28% 61% 46% 33%
Mar–May 2016[40] 31% 58% 51% 28%
Oct–Dec 2015[43] 33% 54% 47% 32%
Apr–Jun 2015 36% 57% 49% 33%
Jan–Mar 2015 38% 53% 53% 28%
Oct–Dec 2014 37% 49% 48% 27%
Jul–Sep 2014 32% 56% 47% 29%
Apr–Jun 2014 34% 56% 49% 31%
Oct–Dec 2013 34% 54% 51% 22%
2013 election
4–7 Mar 2013 51% 36% 49% 29%
Polling conducted by Newspoll and published in The Australian.
^Remainder were "uncommitted" to either leader.

Newspaper endorsements[edit]

Newspaper Endorsement
The Australian Liberal[45]
The Australian Financial Review
The Sunday Times Labor
The West Australian Labor[46]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Labor 55.5% 2PP vote and +12.8-point 2PP swing sourced from Antony Green's temporary estimate within provided ABC link published 30 March 2017, which states "The two-party-preferred count is based on estimates for Baldivis, Moore and Roe. Actual two-party-preferred counts for these seats will be available at a later date. – Final 2017 WA Election Results plus a New Electoral Pendulum: Antony Green ABC 30 March 2017
  2. ^ a b Antony Green (16 March 2017). "The Role of One-Vote One-Value Electoral Reforms in Labor's Record WA Victory". ABC News (Australia). Retrieved 16 March 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c "WA Election 2017". ABC News. 11 March 2017. Retrieved 12 March 2017. 
  4. ^ a b "WA Labor misses out on upper house working majority by one seat". ABC News. 26 March 2017. 
  5. ^ "2017 State General Election Results". Western Australian Electoral Commission. 11 March 2017. Retrieved 12 March 2017. 
  6. ^ Green, Antony. "2017 Western Australian State Election – Analysis of Results" (PDF). Parliamentary Library Western Australia. Retrieved 23 June 2017. 
  7. ^ Sprague, Julie-anne; Ingram, Tess (11 March 2017). "WA election: Labor storms to victory". Australian Financial Review. Retrieved 11 March 2017. 
  8. ^ "Mark McGowan sworn in as WA's 30th Premier". ABC News. 17 March 2017. 
  9. ^ "WA Election 2017 - WA Results". ABC News. 12 March 2017. Retrieved 12 March 2017. 
  10. ^ "WA Election: Seventh minister lost in WA Liberals rout". ABC News. 15 March 2017. Retrieved 16 March 2017. 
  11. ^ "2017 State General Election Results". Western Australian Electoral Commission. 11 March 2017. Retrieved 12 March 2017. 
  12. ^ "WA Election 2017". ABC News. 11 March 2017. Retrieved 12 March 2017. 
  13. ^ "Legislative Council Results". ABC News. 16 March 2017. Retrieved 20 March 2017. 
  14. ^ "Vacancies in two Legislative Council Regions". WAEC. Retrieved 26 March 2017. 
  15. ^ "April 2017 Legislative Council vacancies filled". WAEC. Retrieved 5 April 2017. 
  16. ^ "New laws fix state election dates". Abc.net.au. Retrieved 26 January 2012. 
  17. ^ Antony Green (8 February 2011). "Future election dates". Blogs.abc.net.au. Retrieved 26 January 2012. 
  18. ^ ‘So when is the next election?’: APH.gov.au 1 September 2016
  19. ^ Phillips, Harry C. J. Electoral Law in the State of Western Australia: An Overview. Western Australian Electoral Commission, 2013. ISBN 9780980417340, page 113 (pdf 126). Retrieved 10 March 2017
  20. ^ Green, Antony (6 March 2017). "The growing bias against Perth and the South-West in the Legislative Council". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 7 March 2017. 
  21. ^ Green, Antony. "2015 Western Australian state redistibution". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 
  22. ^ "Bunbury MLA John Castrilli to retire at next State election". The West Australian. 18 August 2016. Retrieved 14 March 2016. 
  23. ^ "Joe Spagnolo: Hunt for WA Liberal leader to replace Colin Barnett after deputy Kim Hames confirms he will not contest next state election". Perth Now. 2 August 2014. Retrieved 9 August 2014. 
  24. ^ "Who will make the team as Libs plan for state election?". 
  25. ^ "Veteran MP to retire from politics". Perth Now. 17 July 2016. Retrieved 27 October 2015. 
  26. ^ "MP Wendy Duncan reflects on career as prospective candidates circle in Kalgoorlie". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 7 December 2015. Retrieved 7 December 2015. 
  27. ^ "Waldron to retire from politics". The West Australian. 25 November 2014. Retrieved 25 November 2014. 
  28. ^ "2017 Western Australian Election - Electoral Pendulum". 3 January 2017. Retrieved 24 January 2017. 
  29. ^ "Elections – Frequently Asked Questions : What is a marginal seat?". Australian Electoral Commission. 6 May 2016. Retrieved 12 February 2017. 
  30. ^ a b c d "Newspoll: 54-46 to Labor in Western Australia". 
  31. ^ "Galaxy: 54-46 to Labor in Western Australia". 4 March 2017. 
  32. ^ Brendan Foster (3 March 2017). "ReachTEL: 50-50 in Western Australia". 
  33. ^ "WA election poll shows One Nation vote on the slide". 
  34. ^ "Newspoll: 54-46 to Labor in Western Australia". 
  35. ^ a b c "Newspoll: 52-48 to Labor in Western Australia". 
  36. ^ "Power poll blow as voters reject power privatisation". 
  37. ^ a b "Baird Government drops behind for first time in NSW; Barnett in trouble in Western Australia while Andrews Government still riding high in Victoria despite CFA union dispute". Roy Morgan Research. 10 October 2016. 
  38. ^ a b "Now ‘too close to call’ in New South Wales as Baird support slips while ALP has slight lead in Western Australia and a clear lead in Victoria". Roy Morgan Research. 8 September 2016. 
  39. ^ "L-NP in front in NSW & WA and ALP well in front in Victoria but parties dead-level in Queensland after LNP elect new Leader Tim Nicholls". Roy Morgan Research. 1 June 2016. 
  40. ^ a b c Newspoll: 54-46 to Labor in Western Australia – The Poll Bludger 12 May 2016
  41. ^ "ALP increases support in all Australian States. Queensland electors narrowly turn down new election after Referendum on 4 year terms successful". Roy Morgan Research. 1 April 2016. 
  42. ^ a b Barnett and Liberals take big hit in poll with McGowan now preferred leader: The West Australian 19 March 2016 - using undedided excluded at ReachTEL: 56-44 to Labor in WA - The Poll Bludger 19 March 2016
  43. ^ a b c Newspoll: 53-47 to Labor in Western Australia – The Poll Bludger 4 January 2016
  44. ^ "Popular Premiers Mike Baird & Daniel Andrews have large leads in NSW & Victoria while other States are close". Roy Morgan Research. Roy Morgan Research. Retrieved 17 October 2015. 
  45. ^ "Too much at stake in WA" (Subscription Required). The Australian. Retrieved 11 March 2017. 
  46. ^ "WA deserves the chance for a fresh start". The West Australian. The West Australian. 9 March 2017. Retrieved 11 March 2017. 

External links[edit]