Nicarbazin

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Nicarbazin
Nicarbazin.png
Names
IUPAC name
1,3-bis(4-nitrophenyl)urea; 4,6-dimethyl-1H-pyrimidin-2-one
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.005.782
UNII
Properties
C19H18N6O6
Molar mass 426.38 g/mol
Appearance light yellow powder
Density 0.5 g/mL
Melting point 265-275 C
slightly soluble in dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) and dimethylformamide (DMF); insoluble in water and methanol
Pharmacology
QP51AE03 (WHO)
Hazards
Lethal dose or concentration (LD, LC):
>0.147 mg/L in rats
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
☒N verify (what is ☑Y☒N ?)
Infobox references

Nicarbazin is a coccidiostat used on meat chickens. It is also used as a contraceptive for population control of Canada geese and feral pigeons.[1][2]

It is also a wide-spectrum anti-parasitic drug approved for veterinary use, effective on Toxocara canis, Toxascaris leonina, Ancylostoma caninum, Uncinaria stenocephala, Trichuris vulpis, Dipylidium caninum, and Taenia sp. and Mesocestoides sp.. Known brand names for specific countries include [3]:

  • Carbigran (the United States)
  • Ceva Nicarbazin (South Africa)
  • Cycarb (New Zealand)
  • Keymix (Australia)
  • Koffogran (South Africa)
  • Kofozin (Israel)
  • Nicarb 25% (the United States)
  • Nicarbazin (Israel)
  • Nicarbazin Elanco (the United States)
  • Nicarbmax 100% (New Zealand)
  • Nicarmix (the United States)
  • Ovistop (Costa Rica and Italy)
  • OvoControl (the United States)
  • PhiCarb (Australia)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "US EPA - Nicarbazin Conditional Registration" (PDF). November 2005. Retrieved 27 August 2015.
  2. ^ Danaher, M.; Campbell, K.; O'Keeffe, M.; Capurro, E.; Kennedy, G.; Elliott, C. T. (2008). "Survey of the anticoccidial feed additive nicarbazin (as dinitrocarbanilide residues) in poultry and eggs". Food Additives & Contaminants: Part A. 25 (1): 32–40. doi:10.1080/02652030701552956. PMID 17957540.
  3. ^ Drugs.com https://www.drugs.com/international/nicarbazin.html. Retrieved 26 June 2017. Missing or empty |title= (help)