Nicholas Horton

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Nicholas (Nick) Horton is an American statistics professor and author. He is the Beitzel Professor in Technology and Society at Amherst College.[1] As of 2022, he will serve as the vice president of the American Statistical Association.[2]

Education[edit]

Horton completed his A.B. at Harvard College and his Sc.D. at the Harvard School of Public Health.[1]

Work[edit]

Horton has written multiple books focusing on R and SAS.[1][3] He is also an author in the fields of statistics education and missing data. He is one of the authors of the GAISE guidelines.[4] With Ben Baumer and Daniel Kaplan, he is the author of Modern Data Science with R.[5] Other notable[citation needed] works include:

  • Normal Sexual Dimorphism of the Adult Human Brain Assessed by In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging [6]
  • Much ado about nothing: A comparison of missing data methods and software to fit incomplete data regression models[7]

He is an editor for the Journal of Statistics and Data Science Education (JSDSE).[8]

Awards[edit]

Fellow of the American Statistical Association.[9]

Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.[10]

Personal life[edit]

Horton resides in Northampton, Massachusetts with his wife, Julia Riseman.[11] The two are advocates for bicycle trails.[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Horton, Nicholas J. | Faculty & Staff | Amherst College". www.amherst.edu. Retrieved 2021-04-05.
  2. ^ "Dionne Price Elected President of American Statistical Association". www.amstat.org. Retrieved 2021-05-23.
  3. ^ Kleinman, Ken (2014). SAS and R : data management, statistical analysis, and graphics. Nicholas J. Horton (2nd ed.). Boca Raton. ISBN 978-1-4665-8450-1. OCLC 881692641.
  4. ^ "Guidelines for Assessment and Instruction in Statistics Education Reports". www.amstat.org. Retrieved 2021-05-17.
  5. ^ Baumer, Benjamin S. (2021). Modern data science with R. Daniel T. Kaplan, Nicholas J. Horton (2nd ed.). Boca Raton. ISBN 978-0-367-19149-8. OCLC 1245354400.
  6. ^ Goldstein, Jill M.; Seidman, Larry J.; Horton, Nicholas J.; Makris, Nikos; Kennedy, David N.; Caviness, Verne S., Jr; Faraone, Stephen V.; Tsuang, Ming T. (2001-06-01). "Normal Sexual Dimorphism of the Adult Human Brain Assessed by In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging". Cerebral Cortex. 11 (6): 490–497. doi:10.1093/cercor/11.6.490. ISSN 1047-3211. PMID 11375910.
  7. ^ Horton, Nicholas J.; Kleinman, Ken P. (2007-02-01). "Much ado about nothing: A comparison of missing data methods and software to fit incomplete data regression models". The American Statistician. 61 (1): 79–90. doi:10.1198/000313007X172556. ISSN 0003-1305. PMC 1839993. PMID 17401454.
  8. ^ "Meet the ASA's 2022 Incoming Editors | Amstat News". 2022-02-01. Retrieved 2022-03-06.
  9. ^ "American Statistical Association Names 48 Fellows for 2012". PRWeb. Retrieved 2021-04-05.
  10. ^ "2017 AAAS Fellows Recognized for Advancing Science | American Association for the Advancement of Science". www.aaas.org. Retrieved 2021-04-05.
  11. ^ Dunau, Bera (2019-08-31). "A new dawn for rail? Valley Flyer pilot makes its debut". Amherst Bulletin.
  12. ^ Kohout, George (2016-01-06). "George Kohout: Recognizing two unsung heroes of Northampton trails, greenways". Daily Hampshire Gazette.