Nicholas Royle

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Nicholas Royle
Born (1963-03-20) 20 March 1963 (age 54)
Manchester, United Kingdom
Occupation Writer
Nationality British
Period (1993–present)
Genre Literary Fiction/Crime Fiction/Horror
Website
www.nicholasroyle.com

Nicholas Royle (born in Manchester, 20 March 1963)[1] is an English novelist, editor, publisher, literary reviewer and creative writing lecturer.[2]

Literary career[edit]

Author[edit]

Royle has written seven novels - Counterparts, Saxophone Dreams, The Matter of the Heart, The Director’s Cut, Antwerp, Regicide and First Novel.[3] He also claims to have written more than 100 short stories, which have appeared in a variety of anthologies and magazines. His last book for Serpent's Tail, publisher of two previous novels, is a short story collection, Mortality.

Awards[edit]

Royle has won a British Fantasy Award three times: Best Anthology in 1992 and 1993 and Best Short Story in 1993. He has been nominated for Best Short Story three further times.[4]

The Matter of the Heart won the Bad Sex in Fiction Award in 1997.[5]

Editor[edit]

As an editor, Royle is best known for having edited[6] The Lighthouse, by Alison Moore, which was shortlisted for the 2012 Man Booker Prize,[7] and The Many by Wyl Menmuir, which was longlisted for the 2016 Man Booker Prize.[8]

He has also edited 12 anthologies including A Book of Two Halves, The Tiger Garden: A Book of Writers’ Dreams, The Time Out Book of New York Short Stories, and Dreams Never End (Tindal Street Press) and several other novels.

Publisher[edit]

Royle owns and manages Nightjar Press, which publishes short-stories as signed, limited edition, chapbooks.[9] Nightjar Press has published authors including M. John Harrison, Christopher Kenworthy, Joel Lane, Alison Moore and Michael Marshall Smith[10]

Academic career[edit]

Royle is a Senior Lecturer in Creative Writing in the Manchester Writing School at Manchester Metropolitan University[11] and has been Chair of Judges for the Manchester Fiction Prize since it was launched in 2009.

Bibliography[edit]

Novels[edit]

Novellas[edit]

Short story collection[edit]

Personal life[edit]

Royle is married with two children and lives in Manchester.

Royle shares his name with a Professor of English at the University of Sussex who is an authority on Jacques Derrida, and the author of textbooks, including The Uncanny, and a novel, Quilt. The two writers are often confused with each other.[12]

Notes[edit]

External links[edit]