Nicholas of Ely

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Nicholas of Ely
Bishop of Winchester
Appointed2 March 1268
Installed27 May 1268
Term ended12 February 1280
PredecessorJohn Gervais
SuccessorRobert Burnell
Other postsBishop of Worcester
Archdeacon of Ely
Orders
Consecration19 September 1266
Personal details
Died12 February 1280
DenominationCatholic
Lord Chancellor
In office
1260–1261
MonarchHenry III of England
Preceded byHenry Wingham
Succeeded byWalter de Merton
Lord Chancellor
In office
1263–1263
MonarchHenry III of England
Preceded byWalter de Merton
Succeeded byJohn Chishull
Lord High Treasurer
In office
1263–1263
MonarchHenry III of England
Preceded byJohn of Caux
Succeeded byHenry

Nicholas of Ely was Lord Chancellor of England, Bishop of Worcester, Bishop of Winchester, and Lord High Treasurer in the 13th century.

Life[edit]

Nicholas was Archdeacon of Ely when he was first appointed chancellor by Henry III in 1260, but he was sacked in favour of Walter de Merton in 1261.[1] His politics were in favour of the Montfortian dispensation in parliament created by the Provisions of Oxford. He supported the new activism for which compromises could be extracted on liberties from the King in exchange for voting money. But on his return from France, Henry III was absolved by the Pope from upholding the provisions. A bull was published in which the reforms were renounced. Both the Justiciar, Hugh Despenser, and the Chancellor were dismissed in favour of the faction around the Marcher Lords. However the offices of state were not abolished, and nor would the overthrow of the provisions mean punishment for the former officials.

Nicholas also held prebends in the diocese of London and was a papal chaplain.[2] Nicholas was a popular reformist figure when he returned to office, although De Montfort insisted that the Council now had the power to appoint, he was appointed Treasurer at the Oxford parliament in April 1263.[3] Montfort's victory at Windsor and Bristol over the royalists could mean that Nicholas would once more be favoured by his ally, he was granted the office of Chancellor in August, but lost both offices later in the year.[1][4][5] He was elected to the see of Worcester about 8 June 1266 and consecrated on 19 September 1266.[6] He was enthroned at Worcester Cathedral on 26 September 1266.[7]

Nicholas was translated to the see of Winchester on 2 March 1268[8] by Pope Clement IV. He was enthroned at Winchester Cathedral on 27 May 1268.[9]

Nicholas died on 12 February 1280.[8]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 85
  2. ^ British History Online Archdeacons of Ely accessed on 2 November 2007
  3. ^ J.R.Maddicott, Montfort,, pp.239-41.
  4. ^ Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 104
  5. ^ T.Wykes, Annales Monastici: The Chronicle of Thomas Wykes,vol.4, ed.H.R. Luard, (London, 1869).
  6. ^ Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 279
  7. ^ British History Online Bishops of Worcester accessed on 2 November 2007
  8. ^ a b Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 276
  9. ^ British History Online Bishops of Winchester accessed on 2 November 2007

References[edit]

  • British History Online Archdeacons of Ely accessed on 2 November 2007
  • British History Online Bishops of Winchester accessed on 2 November 2007
  • British History Online Bishops of Worcester accessed on 2 November 2007
  • Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1996). Handbook of British Chronology (Third revised ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-56350-X.
Political offices
Preceded by
Henry Wingham
Lord Chancellor
1260–1261
Succeeded by
Walter de Merton
Preceded by
Walter de Merton
Lord Chancellor
1263
Succeeded by
John Chishull
Preceded by
John of Caux
Lord High Treasurer
1263
Succeeded by
Henry
Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Walter de Cantilupe
Bishop of Worcester
1266–1268
Succeeded by
Godfrey Giffard
Preceded by
John Gervais
Bishop of Winchester
1268–1280
Succeeded by
Robert Burnell