Nick DeMartino

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Nick DeMartino (born June 15, 1948) is the former Senior Vice President, Media and Technology for the American Film Institute who oversaw digital ventures at the AFI.

Early career[edit]

DeMartino holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Louisville and a Master of Arts in Media Studies from Antioch College. As an award-winning documentary television producer, DeMartino has produced television documentaries on nuclear power, abortion, and primetime comedy, among others. For the Labor Institute of Public Affairs, a media production and distribution unit for organized labor, DeMartino developed and managed a $20 million advertising and communications program, teleconferences, training programs and a cable television service. DeMartino subsequently founded the Washington Community Video Center and TeleVISIONS Magazine. As principal staff writer for the Carnegie Commission on the Future of Public Broadcasting, wrote their report and follow-up study titled Keeping PACE with the New Television. DeMartino recommended the creation of a Fund for Independent Television, the prototype for ITVS.

AFI[edit]

Under DeMartino's leadership, AFI led a number of initiatives that continue to inform larger discussions about how digital media might best be employed within the worlds of entertainment and education.

  • 1990 DeMartino joined AFI to direct the Cinetex trade show, conference, and film festival.
  • 1991 Apple, Inc premiered its groundbreaking multimedia software, QuickTime, on the AFI campus. In addition, DeMartino initiated AFI-related sponsorships with Adobe Systems Systems), Radius, Macromedia, Claris, Avid Technology, Sony, and many others, establishing the AFI as the "go-to" place to use new media production tools.
  • 1992 AFI Computer Media Salons launched as a weekly forum showcasing emerging digital tools, technologies, applications and innovative solutions. The series featured top-tier talent from Hollywood and Silicon Valley.
  • 1994 AFI Advanced Technology Council launched. The advisory body was co-chaired by Adobe Systems Systems CEO/Founder John Warnock and filmmaker James Cameron.
  • 1995 launch of the AFI's first website (wwwlAFIonline.org). The site featured AFI FEST movie schedule, as well as Cinemedia, an exclusive directory of links to other sites that featured content about movies and television.
  • 1996 launched the world's first streaming video site devoted to classic Hollywood movies. The first movie to be streamed was Charlie Chaplin's silent classic "The Rink."
  • 1997 launch of California Digital Arts Workshops, bringing fine artists into new digital career parts and offering public exhibition of avant garde digital media in Los Angeles.
  • 1998 AFI Enhanced Television Workshop allowed the television creative community to explore and develop new forms of interactive media. The Workshop served as the premier R&D development environment for interactive television in the United States.
  • 2000 AFI Screen Education Center launched. Funded by a grant from the U.S. Department of Education, the program delivers curriculum and mentoring services via the web to train teachers in digital filmmaking techniques, with an emphasis on improving literacy and social skills.
  • 2002 AFI Catalog of Feature Films launched providing access to a definitive compendium of information about classic American films.
  • 2005 AFI Digital Content Lab supersedes the AFI Enhanced Television Workshop, broadening the directive of the R&D environment to include a spectrum of digital media platforms and applications.
  • 2007 AFI Blog: Media and Technology launches, providing a constantly updated window onto issues of interest to the digital media community.

Awards and honors[edit]

  • 1995, Los Angeles Business Journal named DeMartino a leader in the technology industry.
  • 1999, DeMartino named one of twenty leaders in broadband technology by the Los Angeles Business Journal.
  • 2006, ranked number 3 in the "Digital 50" compiled by The Hollywood Reporter and the Producers Guild of America's New Media Council.
  • Recipient of the INDIE award from ITVS for service to independent producers.