Nicole Eisenman

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Nicole Eisenman
Born1965 (age 55–56)
EducationRhode Island School of Design (B.F.A.)
Known forRidykeulous
Notable work
  • Heading Down River on the USS J-Bone of an Ass (2017)
  • Procession (2019)
Awards

Nicole Eisenman (born 1965) is French-born American artist known for her oil paintings and sculptures. She has been awarded the Guggenheim Fellowship (1996), the Carnegie Prize (2013), and has thrice been included in the Whitney Biennial (1995, 2012, 2019).[1] On September 29, 2015, she won a MacArthur Fellowship award for "restoring the representation of the human form a cultural significance that had waned during the ascendancy of abstraction in the 20th century."[2]

Eisenman lives in Brooklyn.[3][4][5]

Foghorn Hits the Road (2007)

Biography[edit]

Nicole Eisenman was born in 1965 in Verdun, France[6][7] where her father was stationed as an army psychiatrist. She is of German-Jewish descent; her great-grandmother was Esther Hamerman, a Polish-born painter.[8][9]

In 1970, Eisenman's family moved from France to Scarsdale, New York, where she spent her childhood.[10][11] She attended the Rhode Island School of Design, graduating with a B.F.A in painting in 1987. She then moved to New York City.[12]

Between 2003 and 2009, Eisenman taught at Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson.[13]

Work[edit]

Love or Generosity [nl] (2020), Amsterdam[14]

Eisenman's figurative oil paintings often toy with themes of sexuality, comedy, and caricature.[15] Though she is known for her paintings, the artist also creates installations, drawings, etchings, lithography, monotypes, woodcuts, and sculptures.[15][16] With A.L. Steiner, she is the co-founder of the queer/feminist curatorial initiative Ridykeulous.[17]

Sculpture[edit]

Eisenman also works in creating whimsical sculptures that have been shown at the 58th Venice Biennale, 2017 Skulptur Projekte Münster, and the 2019 Whitney Biennial.[18] Eisenman began working on Sketch for a Fountain in 2012, a bronze piece aquired by the Nasher Sculpture Center in 2019.[19] The acquisition was funded by the Kaleta A. Doolin Acquisitions Fund for Women Artists and the Green Family Collection.[20]

Exhibitions[edit]

Recognition[edit]

Eisenman has been awarded numerous grants and prizes including the Guggenheim Fellowship (1996),[30] the Carnegie Prize (2013),[31] the Anonymous Was a Woman Award (2014)[32] and the Louis Comfort Tiffany Grant (1995).[33] She was also the recipient of a 2015 MacArthur Fellowship. Also in 2015, she was named as one of The Forward 50.[34]

Collections[edit]

The artist's work can be found in a number of institutions, including:

Art market[edit]

Eisenman is represented by Hauser & Wirth (since 2019), Anton Kern and Vielmetter Los Angeles.[43] She previously worked with Galerie Barbara Weiss.[44]

Personal life[edit]

Eisenman is a lesbian. In a 2016 interview with The New York Times Eisenman said of her gender identity, "I’m gender fluid, but I use the “she” pronoun. I believe in the radicality of stretching the definition of what 'she' is."[8] Eisenman uses both "she/her" and "they/them" pronouns.[45]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Nicole Eisenman: Behavior (Rice Gallery, 1998)
  • Nicole Eisenman: Selected works 1993–2003 (Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, 2003)
  • Nicole Eisenman: Selected Works 1994–2004 ed. Victor Mathieu (Walther König, 2008)
  • Nicole Eisenman: The Way We Weren't (Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery, 2010)
  • Nicole Eisenman ed. Beatrix Ruf (JRP-Ringier, 2011)
  • Parkett no. 91 (Parkett Verlag, 2012)
  • Nicole Eisenman: Dear Nemesis, 1993–2013 (Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis/Walther König, 2014)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Solway, Diane (2016-04-21). "Nicole Eisenman Has Both Style and Substance". W Magazine. Retrieved 2018-03-11.
  2. ^ Pogrebin, Robin (2015-09-29). "MacArthur 'Genius Grant' Winners for 2015 Are Announced". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2015-09-29.
  3. ^ "Nicole Eisenman | Whitney Museum of American Art". whitney.org. Archived from the original on 22 September 2015. Retrieved 21 September 2015.
  4. ^ Kotz, Liz (October 1993). "Nicole Eisenman". Artforum International.[dead link]
  5. ^ "A Truly Great Artist". Hyperallergic. 2016-06-05. Retrieved 2018-03-11.
  6. ^ "ULAN Full Record Display (Getty Research)". www.getty.edu. Retrieved 2018-03-11.
  7. ^ Phaidon Editors (2019). Great women artists. Phaidon Press. p. 131. ISBN 978-0714878775.
  8. ^ a b Solomon, Deborah (2016-05-06). "A Conversation With Nicole Eisenman and Grace Dunham". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-04-30.
  9. ^ Newhall, Edith. "All in the Family". Artnews. Retrieved 24 December 2015.
  10. ^ "Even the Art Museums Can't Escape Her Barbs", New York Times, Retrieved 7 September 2014.
  11. ^ Schjeldahl, Peter. "Art's One-Woman Insurgency". The New Yorker. Retrieved 2021-04-30.
  12. ^ a b Parker, Ian. "Every Nicole Eisenman Picture Tells a Story". The New Yorker. Retrieved 2021-02-24.
  13. ^ "Nicole Eisenman", 2013 Carnegie International, Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  14. ^ Pen, Hanneloes; Vugts, Paul (2021-04-28). "Nieuwe rechtbank Amsterdam: statig en strak, maar ook heel open". Het Parool (in Dutch). Retrieved 2021-04-30.
  15. ^ a b c "Eisenmann", Kunsthalle Zurich, 11 August 2014.
  16. ^ Hirsch, Faye (2012-06-13). "Nicole Eisenman's Prints and People". ARTnews.com. Retrieved 2020-05-14.
  17. ^ "Readykeulous by Ridykeulous: This is What Liberation Feels Like™", CAM, Retrieved 13 September 2014.
  18. ^ Scott, Chadd (2019-06-06). "Nicole Eisenman Installation Puts Exclamation Point On Fenway Development". Forbes. Retrieved 2020-09-08.
  19. ^ "Nicole Eisenman's Sketch for a Fountain - by Arthur Peña". www.nashersculpturecenter.org. Retrieved 2021-09-30.
  20. ^ "Recent Acquisition: Nicole Eisenman, Sketch for a Fountain April 27, 2019 - October 27, 2019 | Exhibition - Nasher Sculpture Center". www.nashersculpturecenter.org. Retrieved 2021-09-30.
  21. ^ "Nicole Eisenman / MATRIX 248 (May 3-July 14, 2013) | BAMPFA". bampfa.org. Retrieved 2018-03-11.
  22. ^ "Dear Nemesis, Nicole Eisenman 1993-2013", Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, January 2014 – April 2014. Retrieved 17 February 2015.
  23. ^ "Dear Nemesis: Nicole Eisenman 1993-2013", ICA Philadelphia, Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  24. ^ "Masterpieces & Curiosities: Nicole Eisenman's Seder". The Jewish Museum. Retrieved 2017-04-05.
  25. ^ "Nicole Eisenman: Al-ugh-ories". www.newmuseum.org. Retrieved 2018-03-11.
  26. ^ "Nicole Eisenman". secession.at. Retrieved 2018-03-11.
  27. ^ "Nicole Eisenman". kunsthalle baden-baden (in German). Retrieved 2021-06-04.
  28. ^ "Nicole Eisenman: Sturm und Drang". The Contemporary Austin. Retrieved 2021-06-04.
  29. ^ "Nicole Eisenman – Giant Without a Body – Astrup Fearnley Museet". Retrieved 2021-06-04.
  30. ^ "Nicole Eisenman - John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation", John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  31. ^ "Wielding a New Medium, Nicole Eisenman Wins the Carnegie Prize"., ArtInfo, Retrieved 10 August 2014.
  32. ^ "ICA - Philadelphia, PA - ICA congratulates Anonymous Was A Woman award winners". Institute of Contemporary Art - Philadelphia, PA. Retrieved 2018-03-11.
  33. ^ "Nicole Eisenman at Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis (Contemporary Art Daily)". www.contemporaryartdaily.com. Retrieved 2018-03-11.
  34. ^ "Forward 50 2015". Forward.com. Retrieved 2015-11-11.
  35. ^ "Eisenman, Nicole", Art Institute of Chicago, Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  36. ^ "Nicole Eisenman | MoMA". The Museum of Modern Art. Retrieved 2018-03-11.
  37. ^ "New Work: Drawings Today · SFMOMA". www.sfmoma.org. Retrieved 2020-03-08.
  38. ^ "Walker Art Center". walkerart.org. Retrieved 2018-09-10.
  39. ^ "Whitney Museum of American Art: Collection". collection.whitney.org. Retrieved 2018-03-11.
  40. ^ "Nicole Eisenman | Kunsthalle Zürich". kunsthallezurich.ch. Retrieved 2020-03-08.
  41. ^ "The Jewish Museum". thejewishmuseum.org. Retrieved 2017-04-05.
  42. ^ "Recent Acquisition: Nicole Eisenman, Sketch for a Fountain April 27, 2019 - October 27, 2019 | Exhibition - Nasher Sculpture Center". www.nashersculpturecenter.org. Retrieved 2021-09-29.
  43. ^ Alex Greenberger (January 15, 2020), Nicole Eisenman Joins Powerhouse Hauser & Wirth Gallery Following Star Turns at the Venice and Whitney Biennials ARTnews.
  44. ^ Berlin Art Dealer Barbara Weiss Dies at 56 ARTnews, January 4, 2017.
  45. ^ "See the Models for the Next Fourth Plinth Commission, From Nicole Eisenman's 'Jewelry Tree' to a Statue of a Malawian Revolutionary". Artnet News. 2021-05-24. Retrieved 2021-06-04.

External links[edit]