Nicollet County, Minnesota

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Nicollet County
Nicollet County Courthouse
Nicollet County Courthouse
Map of Minnesota highlighting Nicollet County
Location within the U.S. state of Minnesota
Map of the United States highlighting Minnesota
Minnesota's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 44°20′N 94°15′W / 44.34°N 94.25°W / 44.34; -94.25
Country United States
State Minnesota
FoundedMarch 5, 1853
Named forJoseph Nicolas Nicollet
SeatSt. Peter
Largest cityNorth Mankato
Area
 • Total467 sq mi (1,210 km2)
 • Land448 sq mi (1,160 km2)
 • Water18 sq mi (50 km2)  3.9%%
Population
 (2010)
 • Total32,727
 • Estimate 
(2019)
34,274
 • Density75.8/sq mi (29.3/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district1st
Websitewww.co.nicollet.mn.us

Nicollet County is a county in the U.S. state of Minnesota. As of the 2010 census, the population was 32,727.[1] Its county seat is St. Peter.[2]

Nicollet County is part of the MankatoNorth Mankato, MN Metropolitan Statistical Area.

History[edit]

In 1849 the Minnesota Territory legislature defined the boundaries of nine future counties. One of those, Dakota, contained the area north of the Minnesota River where it altered its flow from southeast to northeast. In 1853 the first settler had homesteaded an area on the northeast run of the river, and the following year the settlement of Saint Peter was platted there. Seeing the inflow of settlers into the areas adjoining the river, on 5 March 1853 the territorial legislature partitioned off the lower portion of Dakota County to form a separate entity. It was named for Joseph Nicolas Nicollet (1786-1843),[3] a French explorer whose maps of the area had been instrumental in the territory's development. The county seat was established at Saint Peter.[4]

Geography[edit]

The Minnesota River flows eastward along the south border of Nicollet County, from its northwest corner to its northeast corner, defining the county's south line. The county terrain consists of low rolling hills, completely devoted to agriculture where possible.[5] The terrain slopes to the east.[6] The county has an area of 467 square miles (1,210 km2), of which 448 square miles (1,160 km2) is land and 18 square miles (47 km2) (3.9%) is water.[7]

Nicollet County's highest point is the lowest high point of all Minnesota counties, with an elevation of 1,065 feet.[8][9] The county's high point is east of Clear Lake and west of the town of Lafayette.

Soils of Nicollet County[10]
Soils of Chamberlain Woods SNA area

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Protected areas[edit]

[5]

Lakes[edit]

  • Annexstad Lake
  • Erickson Lake
  • Middle Lake
  • Oak Leaf Lake
  • Overson Lake
  • Rice Lake
  • Sand Lake
  • Swan Lake

[5]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18603,778
18708,362121.3%
188012,33347.5%
189013,3828.5%
190014,77410.4%
191014,125−4.4%
192015,0366.4%
193016,55010.1%
194018,28210.5%
195020,92914.5%
196023,19610.8%
197024,5185.7%
198026,9299.8%
199028,0764.3%
200029,7716.0%
201032,7279.9%
Est. 201934,274[11]4.7%
US Decennial Census[12]
1790-1960[13] 1900-1990[14]
1990-2000[15] 2010-2019[1]

2000 census[edit]

Age pyramid of county residents based on 2000 United States Census data

As of the 2000 United States Census, there were 29,771 people, 10,642 households, and 7,311 families in the county. The population density was 66.5/sqmi (25.7/km²). There were 11,240 housing units at an average density of 25.1/sqmi (9.69/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 96.37% White, 0.80% Black or African American, 0.26% Native American, 1.14% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.65% from other races, and 0.75% from two or more races. 1.80% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 49.2% were of German, 13.3% Norwegian, 6.8% Swedish and 5.4% Irish ancestry.

There were 10,642 households out of which 35.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.50% were married couples living together, 7.90% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.30% were non-families. 24.00% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.80% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.56 and the average family size was 3.05.

The county population contained 24.70% under the age of 18, 16.40% from 18 to 24, 26.90% from 25 to 44, 21.20% from 45 to 64, and 10.80% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females, there were 99.30 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.90 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $46,170, and the median income for a family was $55,694. Males had a median income of $36,236 versus $25,344 for females. The per capita income for the county was $20,517. About 4.30% of families and 7.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.70% of those under age 18 and 8.00% of those age 65 or over.

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Ghost town[edit]

Townships[edit]

Government and Politics[edit]

Nicollet County has been politically balanced in past decades. Since 1976 the county has selected the Democratic and Republican Party candidates in equal measure in national elections (as of 2016).

Presidential election results
Presidential elections results[16]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 46.6% 8,437 43.6% 7,886 9.8% 1,774
2012 44.8% 8,214 52.6% 9,652 2.7% 491
2008 43.7% 7,968 54.2% 9,887 2.1% 390
2004 49.0% 8,689 49.6% 8,797 1.4% 255
2000 47.1% 7,221 45.9% 7,041 6.9% 1,065
1996 36.5% 5,057 48.9% 6,772 14.5% 2,013
1992 33.9% 5,091 40.3% 6,055 25.9% 3,893
1988 49.9% 6,878 49.3% 6,786 0.8% 115
1984 56.0% 7,472 43.4% 5,789 0.7% 88
1980 47.3% 6,436 39.6% 5,400 13.1% 1,786
1976 49.6% 6,071 47.2% 5,777 3.2% 397
1972 56.3% 6,230 42.3% 4,680 1.4% 159
1968 50.6% 4,671 46.0% 4,244 3.5% 319
1964 41.3% 3,605 58.6% 5,121 0.1% 10
1960 57.1% 5,283 42.8% 3,961 0.1% 11
1956 66.8% 5,322 33.1% 2,636 0.1% 8
1952 68.8% 5,775 30.8% 2,584 0.5% 39
1948 48.8% 3,576 50.0% 3,663 1.2% 86
1944 64.8% 4,345 34.6% 2,321 0.5% 36
1940 62.0% 4,674 37.6% 2,832 0.4% 31
1936 33.7% 2,360 59.1% 4,136 7.2% 507
1932 35.0% 2,217 62.6% 3,960 2.4% 151
1928 59.1% 3,628 40.2% 2,466 0.7% 42
1924 50.1% 2,518 5.7% 287 44.3% 2,226
1920 83.5% 4,115 11.3% 556 5.3% 260
1916 58.4% 1,288 36.9% 814 4.6% 102
1912 21.6% 525 38.3% 929 40.1% 972[17]
1908 59.3% 1,392 35.4% 832 5.3% 124
1904 74.0% 1,677 22.7% 513 3.3% 75
1900 64.1% 1,684 32.7% 858 3.2% 84
1896 66.4% 1,803 30.8% 837 2.8% 75
1892 47.7% 1,098 40.7% 937 11.6% 267
County Board of Commissioners[18]
Position Name District Next Election
Commissioner Marie Dranttel District 1 2020
Commissioner Terry Morrow District 2 2022
Commissioner Denny Kemp District 3 2020
Commissioner Jack Kolars District 4 2022
Commissioner and Chairperson John Luepke District 5 2020
State Legislature (2018-2020)
Position Name Affiliation District
  Senate Nick Frentz[19] Democrat District 19
  House of Representatives Jeff Brand[20] Democrat District 19A
  House of Representatives Jack Considine[21] Democrat District 19B
U.S Congress (2018-2020)
Position Name Affiliation District
  House of Representatives Jim Hagedorn[22] Republican 1st
  Senate Amy Klobuchar[23] Democrat N/A
  Senate Tina Smith[24] Democrat N/A

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved September 1, 2013.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ "About Nicollet County". government of Nicollet County. Retrieved 19 April 2015.
  4. ^ Upton, Warren. Minnesota Geographic Names (1920), pp. 371-4 (accessed 19 April 2019)
  5. ^ a b c Nicollet County MN Google Maps (accessed April 19, 2019)
  6. ^ ""Find an Altitude/Nicollet County MN" Google Maps (accessed April 19, 2019)". Archived from the original on May 21, 2019. Retrieved 19 April 2019.
  7. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". US Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on September 21, 2013. Retrieved October 24, 2014.
  8. ^ "Nicollet County High Point - Peakbagger.com". peakbagger.com. Retrieved 2016-11-28.
  9. ^ "Nicollet County HP - 1,065' Minnesota". listsofjohn.com. Retrieved 2016-11-28.
  10. ^ Nelson, Steven (2011). Savanna Soils of Minnesota. Minnesota: Self. pp. 65-67. ISBN 978-0-615-50320-2.
  11. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved March 26, 2020.
  12. ^ "US Decennial Census". US Census Bureau. Retrieved October 24, 2014.
  13. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved October 24, 2014.
  14. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". US Census Bureau. Retrieved October 24, 2014.
  15. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). US Census Bureau. Retrieved October 24, 2014.
  16. ^ Leip, David. "Atlas of US Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved October 10, 2018.
  17. ^ The leading "other" candidate, Progressive Theodore Roosevelt, received 825 votes, while Socialist candidate Eugene Debs received 70 votes, Prohibition candidate Eugene Chafin received 53 votes, and Socialist Labor candidate Arthur Reimer received 24 votes.
  18. ^ "County Board | Nicollet County, MN - Official Website". www.co.nicollet.mn.us. Retrieved 2020-06-29.
  19. ^ "MN State Senate". www.senate.mn. Retrieved 2020-06-29.
  20. ^ "Rep. Jeff Brand (19A) - Minnesota House of Representatives". www.house.leg.state.mn.us. Retrieved 2020-06-29.
  21. ^ "Rep. Jack Considine Jr. (19B) - Minnesota House of Representatives". www.house.leg.state.mn.us. Retrieved 2020-06-29.
  22. ^ "Representative Jim Hagedorn". Representative Jim Hagedorn. Retrieved 2020-06-25.
  23. ^ "U.S. Senator Amy Klobuchar". www.klobuchar.senate.gov. Retrieved 2020-06-24.
  24. ^ "Home". Senator Tina Smith. Retrieved 2020-06-24.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 44°20′N 94°15′W / 44.34°N 94.25°W / 44.34; -94.25