Nigel Popplewell

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Nigel Popplewell
Personal information
Full name Nigel Francis Mark Popplewell
Born (1957-08-08) 8 August 1957 (age 59)
Chislehurst, Kent, England
Batting style Right-handed
Bowling style Right-arm medium
Role Occasional wicket-keeper
Domestic team information
Years Team
1979–1985 Somerset
1977–1979 Cambridge University
First-class debut 23 April 1977 Cambridge University v Leicestershire
Last First-class 3 August 1985 Somerset v Hampshire
List A debut 7 May 1977 Combined Universities v Kent
Last List A 1 September 1985 Somerset v Sussex
Career statistics
Competition FC LA
Matches 143 123
Runs scored 5070 2077
Batting average 27.11 23.33
100s/50s 4/22 0/8
Top score 172 84
Balls bowled 8290 2158
Wickets 103 49
Bowling average 43.11 32.63
5 wickets in innings 1 0
10 wickets in match 0 n/a
Best bowling 5/33 3/34
Catches/stumpings 110/– 42/2
Source: [1], 13 February 2010

Nigel Francis Mark Popplewell (born 8 August 1957) is a former English first-class cricketer who made over 200 appearances for Somerset between 1979 and 1985. A right-handed batsman and right-arm medium pace bowler, Popplewell also occasionally played as wicket-keeper.[1]

Early career[edit]

Nigel Popplewell was educated at Radley College, where he captained the First XI in 1975, scoring 720 runs at an average of 45.00 and taking 60 wickets at 10.13.[2] He went up to Selwyn College, Cambridge,[3] and played in the Cambridge University team from 1977 to 1979. He began playing for Hampshire Second XI in 1976.[4]

In 1976-77, aged 19 and before he had played first-class cricket, he took part in the first cricket tour of Bangladesh with Marylebone Cricket Club.[5] In 1978 he played two matches for Northamptonshire Second XI, and in 1979 he joined Somerset.[4]

Career with Somerset[edit]

A few weeks after playing his last match for Cambridge he made his Somerset debut against the touring Indians, scoring 37 and 32 at number eight to help Somerset avoid defeat.[6] He was a regular member of the Somerset team from 1980 to 1985, scoring over 1000 first-class runs in a season in 1984 and 1985.[7]

He was a member of Somerset's title-winning List A teams of the period: the 1979 John Player League; the 1981 Benson & Hedges Cup, after he had won the Man of the match award in the semi-final;[8] the 1982 Benson & Hedges Cup; and the 1983 NatWest Bank Trophy, when he made a valuable 35 at number six after going to the wicket with the score at 95 for 4.[9]

In August 1985, after scoring 1064 runs at an average of 38.00 in 18 first-class matches, and a few weeks after making his highest score, 172 against Essex in an opening partnership of 243 with Peter Roebuck,[10] Popplewell retired from cricket to resume his legal studies.[11]

Career after cricket[edit]

Popplewell taught school science during the winter recesses from cricket during his cricket years. He re-qualified as a solicitor in 1987, practising in Taunton, where he specialised first in litigation, then company law and subsequently tax.[12] He is now the joint head of Burges Salmon's corporate tax team, and chairman of the Law Society's Stamp Taxes Working Group.[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Player profile: Nigel Popplewell". CricketArchive. Retrieved 2010-02-13. 
  2. ^ Wisden 1976, p. 902.
  3. ^ Wisden 1980, p. 646.
  4. ^ a b "Second Eleven Championship Matches played by Nigel Popplewell". CricketArchive. Retrieved 1 January 2017. 
  5. ^ J.G. Lofting, "Bangladesh back on the map", The Cricketer, April 1977, p. 29.
  6. ^ Wisden 1980, pp. 342–43.
  7. ^ "First-class Batting and Fielding in Each Season by Nigel Popplewell". CricketArchive. Retrieved 1 January 2017. 
  8. ^ "Somerset v Kent 1981". CricketArchive. Retrieved 1 January 2017. 
  9. ^ Wisden 1984, p. 668.
  10. ^ "Essex v Somerset 1985". CricketArchive. Retrieved 1 January 2017. 
  11. ^ Wisden 1986, p. 517.
  12. ^ "Mr Nigel Popplewell MA, CTA(Fellow), Solicitor". ClerksRoom. Retrieved 1 January 2017. 
  13. ^ "Nigel Popplewell, Partner". Burges Salmon. Retrieved 1 January 2017. 

External links[edit]