Nigel Scullion

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Senator The Honourable
Nigel Scullion
Nigel Scullion Portrait 2010.jpg
Minister for Indigenous Affairs
Assumed office
18 September 2013
Prime MinisterTony Abbott
Malcolm Turnbull
Scott Morrison
Preceded byJenny Macklin
Minister for Community Services
In office
9 October 2003 – 3 December 2007
Prime MinisterJohn Howard
Preceded byJohn Cobb
Succeeded byJenny Macklin
Senator for the Northern Territory
Assumed office
10 November 2001
Preceded byGrant Tambling
Personal details
BornNigel Gregory Scullion
(1956-05-04) 4 May 1956 (age 62)
London, England, United Kingdom
CitizenshipAustralian
British (1956–2001)[1]
Political partyCountry Liberal Party
Other political
affiliations
The Nationals (federal caucus)
Coalition
Spouse(s)Jenny Scullion (divorced)
Carol Sexton
Children3
OccupationFisherman

Nigel Gregory Scullion (born 4 May 1956 in London, England) is an Australian politician who has been a Senator for the Northern Territory since November 2001, representing Country Liberal Party. He sits with the National Party in the Senate, and has been the Leader of the Nationals in the Senate since 2013; he previously served in that role between 2007 and 2008, and was Deputy Leader of the National Party between 2007 and 2013. Scullion has served as the Minister for Indigenous Affairs since 18 September 2013, in the governments of Tony Abbott, Malcolm Turnbull, and Scott Morrison.[2]

Early years and background[edit]

Scullin was born in London, England, then lived in Deakin, Canberra, during high school. He is married with 3 children.[3] Before entering the Senate he was a professional fisherman and graduated from the Australian Rural Leadership Program.[4]

Career[edit]

Scullion received media attention early in his career when questions arose over how his business relationships with government bodies might have affected his eligibility to sit in the Parliament.[5][6] Investigations continued for some time, but in the end did not affect his membership of Parliament.[7][8]

On 30 January 2007, he was appointed Minister for Community Services in the Australian Government. He held office for only 10 months before the Howard Government was defeated in an election.

In February 2007, Scullion was elected to the position of deputy Senate leader of the federal National Party and was subsequently promoted to the positions of deputy parliamentary leader of the National Party and leader of the party in the Senate on 3 December 2007, following the coalition's defeat.[9] On 6 December 2007 he was named as Shadow Minister for Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries in the shadow ministry chosen by new Opposition Leader Brendan Nelson.[10] In 2008, he was defeated by Barnaby Joyce for the Senate leadership,[11] but retained the deputy leadership of the National Party.[12]

Scullion was re-elected at the 2010 election and appointed Shadow Minister for Indigenous Affairs by Opposition leader, Tony Abbott.[13] In February 2012, Scullion appeared in the second episode of Kitchen Cabinet with Annabel Crabb, when they went into the mud flats for crustaceans, which she has recalled as the most memorable show.[14] Following Joyce's move to the House of Representatives in 2013, Scullion reclaimed his position of Senate leader but lost the deputy parliamentary leadership to Joyce.

On February 11, 2016, Joyce was elected leader of the Nationals with Fiona Nash as his deputy. As Nash is a Senator like Scullion, it looks like Scullion would have to relinquish the Senate leadership to deputy parliamentary leader Senator Nash. In fact Senator Nash had been Senator Scullion's Senate deputy prior to her election as deputy leader of the parliamentary party.

After the High Court ruled that Joyce and Nash were ineligible during the 2017 Australian parliamentary eligibility crisis, Scullion was appointed interim parliamentary leader of the National Party.[15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Crabb, Annabel (29 July 2017). "Section 44 forcing politicians into extraordinary feats of intrepidity". Radio Australia. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 5 September 2017.
  2. ^ "Tony Abbott's cabinet and outer ministry". smh.com.au. AAP. 16 September 2013. Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  3. ^ "Senator the Hon Nigel Scullion". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 4 August 2010.
  4. ^ "Biography for SCULLION, the Hon. Nigel Gregory". Parliament of Australia – Parlinfo Search. 8 December 2009. Retrieved 4 August 2010.
  5. ^ Loizou, John; Hinde, Suellen (7 May 2002). "Senator faces spotlight". Northern Territory News.
  6. ^ Faulkner, John; et al. (14 May 2002), "Senate Debates", Hansard, Parliament of Australia, pp. 1393–1398
  7. ^ "Senator probe". Northern Territory News. 25 September 2003.
  8. ^ Maharaj, Rajiv (17 February 2004). "Funds inquiry clears Territory senator". Northern Territory News.
  9. ^ "Truss wins Nationals leadership". ABC News. 3 December 2007. Retrieved 3 December 2007.
  10. ^ Parliament of Australia, Shadow Ministry list, 6 December 2007 Archived 25 October 2009 at the Wayback Machine., retrieved January 2008.
  11. ^ "Nationals won't toe Libs' line: Joyce". Retrieved 15 September 2016.
  12. ^ Barnaby Joyce promoted to Nats Senate leader: Fairfax 17/9/2008 Archived 17 September 2008 at the Wayback Machine.
  13. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 17 September 2010. Retrieved 20 May 2011.
  14. ^ Leys, Nick (2 September 2013). "Ten questions for Annabel Crabb". The Australian. Retrieved 4 September 2013.
  15. ^ Knaus, Christopher (28 October 2017). "Turnbull: Nationals happy for Julie Bishop to be acting prime minister". The Guardian. Retrieved 7 November 2017.

External links[edit]

Parliament of Australia
Preceded by
Grant Tambling
Senator for the Northern Territory
2001–present
Served alongside: Trish Crossin, Nova Peris
Incumbent
Political offices
Preceded by
John Cobb
Minister for Community Services
2003–2007
Succeeded by
Jenny Macklin
Preceded by
Jenny Macklin
as Minister for Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs
Minister for Indigenous Affairs
2013–present
Incumbent
Party political offices
Preceded by
Sandy Macdonald
Deputy Leader of the National Party of Australia in the Senate
2007
Succeeded by
Ron Boswell
Preceded by
Ron Boswell
Leader of the National Party of Australia in the Senate
2007–2008
Succeeded by
Barnaby Joyce
Preceded by
Warren Truss
Deputy Leader of the National Party of Australia
2007–2013
Preceded by
Barnaby Joyce
Leader of the National Party of Australia in the Senate
2013–present
Incumbent