Nike Shox

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A pair of Nike Shox NZ

Shox is a shoe feature developed by Nike and incorporated in several of their flagship athletic sports shoes. The shoe design includes a support system feature, which is an arrangement of small hollow columns in the midsole supporting the shoe's heel, which are made primarily with polyurethane. There are different formations of the shox technology, but most models include four circular columns in a square formation to provide cushioning. Later variations in shox models added one or two additional shox, 25 mm high, though they may vary in height; as well as triangular and rectangular shox that Nike claims provide better stability. Some shoes have midsoles made entirely of Shox, like the TL series.

Nike claims that Shox not only absorb impact from heel strike while running, but also claims they "spring back" and add more power to a runner's stride. Aside from this alleged boost in speed, the Shox is supposed to provide superior shock absorption with high-tech elastic foam.

The newer Shox series is compatible with "Nike+ technology." The Nike Shox Saya+ is the most recent Shox with this feature. The new Nike Shox Q'Vida Hi shoe is a new woman's "dance boot" implementation of Shox.

Actor Hugh Laurie of Fox's House is said to have 37 pairs of size 12½ Shox that he wears on the show and off set.[citation needed]

Comedian Jerry Seinfeld is also a fan of, and wears Nike Shox.[1]

Some of Nike’s best selling shoes include Shox, like the Shox NZ and Shox Turbo, which are available in different colors. These shoes can be found for customization on NikeID, Nike's online shoe customizing site. There are numerous options like different colors and materials for the Shox, along with custom tags.

On February 17, 2006, BBC News reported that Nike had filed a patent infringement suit against rival Adidas, claiming that a range of their trainers replicated its technology.[2]

Timeline[edit]

Nike Shox Turbo 11

In 1984, designer Bruce Kilgore began researching the Shox project design. Inspiration for the shoe is said to have come from viewing indoor track sprinters appear to "bounce" after impacting the surface of the track. Nike developers experimented with many materials that were unable to provide the runner with sufficient support and also returning a small portion of energy to the runner following impact with the ground. Ultimately, polyurethane was developed as the key component to the Shox system success. Nike describes the Shox technology

2000[edit]

Nike releases the first Shox based shoe. The shoe attracted considerable excitement due in part to the timing of its release. The new millennium energized consumers with hopes for new technologies, which contributed heavily to Nike Shox' early success.[3]

During the 2000 Summer Olympics, the brand saw a tremendous boost in popularity when Team USA's Vince Carter dunked over a 7'2" center from Team France in a pair of Shox. Carter's dunk would become a major influence on Shox' advertisement strategy.[4]

2004[edit]

The release of two popular Shox basketball shoes, the Nike Shox Explosive and the Nike Shox Elevate. The Shox VC IV, Shox signature shoe for Vince Carter, is also released.

2008[edit]

Some of the new Shox are compatible with the Nike+iPod feature, particularly the Nike Shox Saya.

2017[edit]

Nike ends production of most designs implementing the Shox feature.

2018[edit]

Shox Gravity released in January 2018 with tagline, "The 'Boing' is Back". This new model replaces traditional string laces with "Flywire" cable retention.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]