Nimrod Kamer

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Nimrod Kamer
Nimrod Kamer Miami Basel.jpg
Nimrod in Miami Basel, 2017
Nationality Romanian, Israeli
Education Sam Spiegel Film and Television School
Genres Gonzo journalism, satire
Notable works and roles The Social Climber's Handbook, 2018 book

Nimrod Kamer is a satirist, comedy writer/performer and journalist based in London.

Life and career[edit]

Nimrod Kamer in Essex Fashion Week

Kamer claims to hold both Romanian and Israeli passports.[1] Kamers' public career started in Israel in 2005, as the Sudoku tutor known as "Captain Sudoku".[2] In 2006, he started writing for the Hebrew-language financial newspaper Globes under editor Roy Arad.[citation needed] He contributed to the first edition of Maayan, an Israeli arts magazine edited by Roy Arad and Joshua Simon.[3] In 2009, Kamer became social media manager of BIP, a comedy channel owned by Keshet Broadcasting. Under that channel he eventually created comedy shows Michael and I[4] and Jobless Nimrod.[5]

Moving to London in 2011, Kamer started publishing periodically in film and written form on BBC Newsnight,[6] VICE Magazine,[7] The Guardian,[8] WIRED magazine,[9] The Huffington Post,[10] London Evening Standard,[11] GQ,[12] and The Daily Dot.[13] In 2012 he began appearing as himself on UK's Channel 4 show Random Acts alongside Heydon Prowse, as well as on Russia Today news. In September 2013 he presented a Guardian show titled #Thinkfluencer[14] in association with Arte Channel.

In late 2016 Kamer began as an art editor for British GQ magazine, which lasted until the early part of 2018.[15] He has interviewed Takashi Murakami, Svetlana Marich, Kamiar Maleki and Adrian Cheng, and featured numerous graduate artists from Manchester School of Art and Goldsmiths, University of London.

On 13 July 2017, Kamer attended The Spectator summer party in Whitehall and briefly spoke to then Prime Minister Theresa May about his concerns as a Romanian passport holder residing in the UK in the wake of Brexit. The PM assured him he can stay in the country and Fraser Nelson reassured it once hearing that Kamer is also an Israeli passport holder.[1][16]

Selected spoofs, satires and journalism[edit]

Nimrod Kamer at a garden party hosted by Evgeny Lebedev alongside Rupert Murdoch and Nigel Farage, 2016

Kamer has made several adversarial news films alongside satirical reporting.

In 2006, he visited Egypt and made a documentary titled Girls at the Cairo National Stadium, on female spectators at the Cairo International Stadium, during one of the matches of the Africa Cup of Nations. In the film he focused on the girls in the crowd, which caused the Daily News Egypt to write an article called "Filming Gone Too Far?", about the ethics of filming Egyptian lady fans without permission.[17]

In April 2012, he made a series of prank videos in which he extorted celebrities vis-á-vis vandalising their Wikipedia pages.[18][19][20] In May 2012, he posed as a rich man and made "indecent proposals" to celebrities such as Kelly Brook attending the Cannes Film Festival.[21] In April 2012, he appeared in the video series produced by Don't Panic, dressed in an old lord outfit whilst arriving at the House of Lords to claim various expenses (Lords are reimbursed for expenses). He "purchased" land in Scotland, a token amount for £29.99, which presumably made him a de facto lord.[22] In October 2012, Kamer created a fake Obama Kenya birth video to highlight the "Birthers" and Donald Trump's obsession with getting an old 8mm footage of the US President alleged African birth.[23][24]

During 2013 he created a fake TED Talk with Billie JD Porter to ridicule the TED apparatus and satirise individuals and companies who use Wikipedia for profit. It was embedded on Gawker.[25][26] In March 2013 he reported on the new "finger hashtag" in Wired magazine.[27] Also in 2013, Kamer filed a Russia Today report, where he asked West Bank Settlers about sweet real estate deals for Jews only.[28]

In June 2014, Nimrod Kamer joined Katharine Hamnett to perform a stunt outside Hackney Town Hall, aiming to make Hackney Mayor Jules Pipe ban all Monsanto round-up herbicides being used in the borough.[29] In July 2014, Kamer travelled to Nassau to investigate a leak by Edward Snowden that suggested the NSA are listening to phone calls made in the Bahamas. He spoke with local ministers, parliament members and attended a local Freedom of Information rally.[30][31] In December 2014, Business Insider,[32] as well as the Daily Mail[33] reported on Kamer's satirical quest to become the worst rated passenger in Uber's history.

Other works[edit]

In November 2015, Kamer and German novelist Delilah Jay released a song titled It's A Boy with the hope of representing the United Kingdom in the upcoming Eurovision Song Contest 2016. Eurovision news source Wiwibloggs published the story.[34] Kamer is also hosting The Golden News Shower on Fair Planet, directed by William Pime and commissioned by Joseph Reich.[35]

In 2018, Kamer published a 133-page book The Social Climber's Handbook: A Shameless Guide (BIS Publishing) with illustrations by Charlie Behrens (son of Timothy Behrens).[36]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "EU citizen confronts Theresa May telling her: 'I'm about to get deported'". The Independent. Retrieved 2017-07-24.
  2. ^ Gal Karniel (21 July 2005). "Moreover / Zen and the art of Sudoku". Haaretz. Israel. Retrieved 21 September 2014.
  3. ^ "maayan2 - Roy Chicky Arad Online האתר של רועי צ'יקי ארד". sites.google.com. Retrieved 2016-10-07.
  4. ^ Avi Schneebaum (1 December 2009). "Funny, in 140 characters or less". Haaretz. Israel. Retrieved 21 September 2014.
  5. ^ Nimrod Kamer (February 2010). "Jobless Nimrod". Channel 2 (in Hebrew). Israel. Retrieved 21 September 2014.
  6. ^ Nimrod Kamer and James Clayton (8 January 2014). "London Men's Fashion Week LCM". Newsnight. BBC. Retrieved 21 September 2014.
  7. ^ Nimrod Kamer and William Pine (14 September 2012). "Nimrod Visits Downton Abbey". Vice. Retrieved 21 September 2014.
  8. ^ Heydon Prowse and Nimrod Kamer (3 February 2014). "Benefits Street: the alternative. Welcome to Bonus Street". The Guardian. Retrieved 21 September 2014.
  9. ^ Nimrod Kamer (6 March 2013). "Finger-Hashtags". Wired. Retrieved 21 September 2014.
  10. ^ Nimrod Kamer (14 April 2013). "Twenty Twitter Etiquette Rules". Huffington Post. Retrieved 21 September 2014.
  11. ^ Nimrod Kamer (14 March 2014). "The new Yoofemisms: stay down with the kids with some super-hot lingo". London Evening Standard. Retrieved 21 September 2014. Pictures by William Pine and Zoë Jenkin
  12. ^ Nimrod Kamer (28 October 2016). "7 ART APPS THAT TERRIFY ARTISTS". GQ. Retrieved 28 October 2016.
  13. ^ Nimrod Kamer (February 2014). "How to troll Twitter in ways you've never even imagined". The Daily Dot. Retrieved 21 September 2014.
  14. ^ "Emoji to get some long-awaited diversity with new range of skin tones". The Guardian. 4 November 2014. Retrieved 4 November 2014.
  15. ^ "Nimrod Kamer at GQ". GQ. Retrieved 26 April 2017.
  16. ^ "Theresa May And David Davis Confronted By Romanian Journalist At Spectator Summer Party". Huffingtonpost.co.uk. 2017-07-14. Retrieved 2017-07-24.
  17. ^ Farah El Alfy (27 February 2006). "Filming Gone Too Far?". The Daily News Egypt. Archived from the original on 14 February 2012. Retrieved 21 September 2014.
  18. ^ Fruzsina Eördögh (25 April 2012). "Israeli prankster Nimrod Kamer faces Wikipedia deletion for celebrity extortion". The Daily Dot. Retrieved 21 September 2014.
  19. ^ Milo Yiannopoulos (20 April 2012). "Warring With Wikipedia". The Kernel. Retrieved 21 September 2014.
  20. ^ Thomas Halleck (8 November 2013). "Wikipedia And Paid Edits: Companies Pay Top Dollar To Firms Willing To 'Fix' Their Entries". International Business Times. Retrieved 18 November 2013.
  21. ^ "Indecent proposal". The Irish News. 28 May 2012. Retrieved 21 September 2014.
  22. ^ "Comedian Descends on House of Lords". Political Scrapbook. 19 April 2012. Retrieved 21 September 2014.
  23. ^ Drew Grant (31 October 2012). "Exclusive: The Making of the Very Fake 'Obama's Kenya Birth Video'". The New York Observer. Retrieved 21 September 2014.
  24. ^ Ron Friedman (4 November 2012). "Israeli behind fake Obama birth video". The Times of Israel. Retrieved 21 September 2014.
  25. ^ John Cook (13 June 2013). "Must-Watch TED Talk On Monetizing Wikipedia". Gawker. Retrieved 21 September 2014.
  26. ^ Drew Grant (20 June 2013). "Exclusive: New Media's Merry Prankster Takes on Sacred Techno-Calf with 'TED(µ) Talk'". The New York Observer. Retrieved 21 September 2014.
  27. ^ Drew Grant (6 March 2013). "Don't Start Finger Hashtagging Quite Yet". The New York Observer. Retrieved 21 September 2014.
  28. ^ Anissa Naouai (22 January 2013). "'Expansion a win-win welfare state for Israel': Nimrod Kamer on gonzo foray into Ei settlement". Russia Today. Retrieved 21 September 2014.
  29. ^ Emma Bartholomew (2 June 2014). "Katharine Hamnett accuses Hackney Council of ignoring weedkiller petition". Hackney Gazette. Retrieved 21 September 2014.
  30. ^ "'US spies on whole world, so what?' – Bahamas minister". Russia Today. 9 July 2014. Retrieved 21 September 2014.
  31. ^ Ryan Devereaux (9 July 2014). "Bahamians React to NSA Surveillance". The Intercept. Retrieved 21 September 2014.
  32. ^ Caroline Moss (2 December 2014). "UK Journalist Claims He's The First Uber User With A 1-Star Average Rating". Business Insider. Retrieved 2 December 2014.
  33. ^ Alexandra Klausner (3 December 2014). "Man goes on journey to become Uber's worst passenger and films the confused reaction of drivers when he asks to be scored just one star". Daily Mail. Retrieved 3 December 2014.
  34. ^ William Lee Adams (15 December 2015). "Delilah Jay And Nimrod Kamer Submit Outrageous Song To UK Eurovision Selection". Wiwibloggs. Retrieved 3 December 2014.
  35. ^ Engage., fairplanet | Read, Debate:. "Video Column produced in London | FAIRPLANET.ORG | Read, Debate: Engage". fairplanet | Read, Debate: Engage. Retrieved 2017-10-19.
  36. ^ Nimrod Kamer (May 2018). The Social Climber's Handbook: A Shameless Guide. BIS Publishers. p. 112. ISBN 978-9063694838.