Nina Marković

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Nina Marković
Alma mater
Awards
Scientific career
Fields
Institutions
ThesisTransport properties and quantum phase transitions in ultrathin films of metals[1] (1998[1])
Doctoral advisorAllen Goldman[1]
Notable studentsJames Medford[2]

Nina Marković is a Croatian-American physicist. Her work focuses on quantum transport in low-dimensional systems, superconductivity, nanostructures, and quantum computing. She received a Sloan Research Fellowship in 2004. Marković worked at Delft University of Technology, Harvard University, and Johns Hopkins University before joining the Goucher College Department of Physics and Astronomy in 2015.

Education[edit]

In 1993, Marković earned a Bachelor of Science in Physics from University of Zagreb under advisor Boran Leontić. At University of Minnesota in 1998, she earned a doctorate in physics.[2] She completed her thesis titled Transport properties and quantum phase transitions in ultrathin films of metals under her doctoral advisor Allen Goldman and received the Aneesur Rahman Award for best thesis.[1] From 1998–2000, Marković conducted postdoctoral research at Delft University of Technology with Herre van der Zant and Hans Mooij (de). She was a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University where she conducted research with Michael Tinkham from 2000–2002.[2]

Career[edit]

Marković joined the faculty at Johns Hopkins University as an assistant professor of physics and astronomy in 2003. She was awarded a Sloan Research Fellowship in 2004.[3] In August 2004, she was awarded $99,999 from the National Science Foundation to conduct a study on quantum entanglement of electrons.[4] She won a $500,000 National Science Foundation CAREER Award to pursue research on electrical properties in nanometer scale materials in 2006.[3] Marković was promoted to associate professor at Johns Hopkins in 2009.[2] In August 2011, she was awarded $360,000 from NSF to conduct a study on Spin Control in One-Dimensional Quantum Dots.[5] In the fall of 2015, Marković joined the Goucher College Department of Physics and Astronomy as an associate professor in 2015.[6][7] In August 2015, she was awarded $430,371 from NSF to conduct a study on Designing Quantum Matter with Superconducting Nanowires.[8]

She is a fellow of the American Physical Society and member of the Materials Research Society.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Markovic, Nina (September 1998). Transport properties and quantum phase transitions in ultrathin films of metals (Ph. D.). University of Minnesota. Docket 9903638. Retrieved March 12, 2018.
  2. ^ a b c d e Marković, Nina (2015). "Nina Markovic (CV)" (PDF). Johns Hopkins University. Retrieved March 11, 2018.
  3. ^ a b De Nike, Lisa (February 13, 2006). "Physicist Nina Markovic wins prestigious NSF CAREER Award". Johns Hopkins Gazette. Retrieved March 11, 2018.
  4. ^ "NER: Superconductor-nanotube Entangler". National Science Foundation. 2004. Retrieved March 11, 2018.
  5. ^ "Spin Control in One-Dimensional Quantum Dots". National Science Foundation. 2011. Retrieved March 11, 2018.
  6. ^ "New Faculty for Fall 2015". In The Loop. May 12, 2015. Retrieved March 11, 2018.
  7. ^ Sundermier, Ali (June 29, 2017). "New method could enable more stable and scalable quantum computing, physicists report". Phys.org. Retrieved March 11, 2018.
  8. ^ "Designing Quantum Matter with Superconducting Nanowires". National Science Foundation. 2015. Retrieved March 11, 2018.

External links[edit]