Ninoy Aquino Stadium

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Ninoy Aquino Stadium
Ninoy Aquino Stadium.jpg
Former names Rizal Multi-Purpose Arena
Location Manila, Philippines
Owner Philippine Sports Commission
Operator Philippine Sports Commission
Capacity 6,000
Construction
Renovated January 1989
Tenants
UAAP (1997–2000, 2006–2007)
NCAA (1999, 2006)
PBA
Manila Metrostars (1998)
PBL (1990–1996)
Shakey's V-League

The Ninoy Aquino Stadium is one of two indoor sporting arenas located in the Rizal Memorial Sports Complex in Manila, Philippines, the other being the Rizal Memorial Coliseum.

The arena is named after former Senator Benigno S. Aquino Jr., commonly known as Ninoy Aquino.

History[edit]

The venue was formerly an open-air stadium before being converted into a covered indoor arena. Formerly called the Rizal Multi-Purpose Arena, the arena was renovated in time for the 1989 ABC Under-18 Championships hosted by the Philippines, which opened in January 24, 1989. At the opening of the tournament, the arena was renamed the Ninoy Aquino Stadium and a marker dedicating the arena was unveiled. The renovation included new chairs and a new scoring system from South Korea installed by Korean technicians.[1][2][3]

The arena hosted the volleyball tournament of the 1991 Southeast Asian Games, The table tennis competitions of the 2005 Southeast Asian Games and the 2013 FIBA Asia Championship as the second venue of the tournament.

It has also hosted mostly college basketball games such as the UAAP, NCAA, NCRAA and the NAASCU. Currently, it is also known for hosting taekwondo tournaments, the two editions of the BSCP National Pool Championships and as one of the alternate venues of PBA games. It was also the home court of the Manila Metrostars in the now-defunct Metropolitan Basketball Association.

Notable events at the Ninoy Aquino Stadium[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Mysterious no show by Youth cage". Manila Standard. 4 January 1989. Retrieved 15 June 2015. 
  2. ^ "Sin to bless cage site". Manila Standard. 9 January 1989. Retrieved 15 June 2015. 
  3. ^ "It could have cost much less". Manila Standard. 22 March 1989. Retrieved 15 June 2015. 

Coordinates: 14°33′51″N 120°59′28″E / 14.56417°N 120.99111°E / 14.56417; 120.99111