No Need to Argue

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No Need to Argue
CranberriesNoNeedToArgueAlbumcover.jpg
Studio album by
Released3 October 1994
RecordedNovember 1993–August 1994
Studio
Genre
Length50:30
LabelIsland
ProducerStephen Street
The Cranberries chronology
Everybody Else Is Doing It, So Why Can't We?
(1993)
No Need to Argue
(1994)
To the Faithful Departed
(1996)
Singles from No Need to Argue
  1. "Zombie"
    Released: 19 September 1994
  2. "Ode to My Family"
    Released: 21 November 1994
  3. "I Can't Be with You"
    Released: 27 February 1995
  4. "Ridiculous Thoughts"
    Released: 31 July 1995

No Need to Argue is the second studio album by Irish alternative rock band the Cranberries, released on 3 October 1994. It is the band's best selling album, and has sold 17 million copies worldwide as of 2014.[7] It contains the band's most successful single, "Zombie". The album's mood is darker and harsher than that on Everybody Else Is Doing It, So Why Can't We?, released a year before.

Composition[edit]

In some of the songs, the band decided to take on a rockier and heavier side, using distortion and increasing the volume. The song "Yeats' Grave" – incorrectly listed on the album as "Yeat's Grave" and never corrected for any of the album's physical re-releases  – is about William Butler Yeats, and quotes one of his poems, No Second Troy. The O'Riordan written track "Zombie" is, according to her, about the Warrington IRA bombings in 1993 that resulted in the death of two children.[8]

Cover art[edit]

For the sleeve design, Art Director Cally re-enlisted photographer Andy Earl and hired the same sofa that featured on the debut album. The sofa was transported by hand to many locations in and around Dublin including Dalkey Island, coming to rest in a photo studio in Dublin where the white room had been constructed for the cover shot. The band, somewhat influenced by a recent Blur photo, decided to dress up and wear suits. The hand lettering was by Charlotte Villiers, video coordinator at Island Records and distant relative of the Villiers engine manufacturing family.[9]

Each single sleeve featured the band on the sofa in a different location. These images also appeared in the album's booklet. The disc itself featured a photo of just the sofa in the same room. The sofa later appeared in the video for "Alright" by the British band Supergrass in 1995.[10]

Critical Reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic4/5 stars[11]
Chicago Tribune3/4 stars[12]
Entertainment WeeklyB[13]
NME4/10[14]
Q4/5 stars[15]
Robert Christgau(2-star Honorable Mention)(2-star Honorable Mention)[16]
Rolling Stone2.5/5 stars[17]
San Francisco Examiner3/5 stars[18]
Sputnikmusic4.5/5[19]

Dylan Yadav of Immortal Reviews wrote: "No Need To Argue, their 1994 record that cemented their importance in Irish music". Yadav described that the "rustic upbringing" of O'Riordan's childhood—reflected on "Ode to My Family", "gives credence to the rest of the album and it's personal, grassroots presence". "Yeat's Grave", in "similar fashion" of "Zombie", "is dark and describes those struggles", Yadav opined. He finished the retrospective review by stating that "the Cranberries turned their struggles to art in No Need To Argue, an album that helped bring to light what the culture of Ireland was. Dolores O'Riordan made it all happen with her voice, and that's not to discredit the rest of the band; but that voice is what made the Cranberries stand out amongst the rest. She voiced the struggle of a whole country".[20] In a contemporary review, J. D. Considine wrote that some songs reminded the vocal styles of other artists like "Ridiculous Thoughts" recalling Sinead O'Connor, "particularly the way O'Riordan handles the phrase 'Twister, aow' and "Zombie" is a bit too much like early Siouxsie and the Banshees". Though Considine positively added, "neither song makes that debt seem especially problematic". The reviewer praised O'Riordan for her performance; "the most memorable thing about her delivery is its unvarnished emotionality".[21] In a retrospective review, AllMusic noted a progression in O'Riordan's way of singing: "No Need to Argue starts to see O'Riordan take a more commanding and self-conscious role", notably on the heavy rock track "Zombie". However, reviewer Ned Raggett stated; "where No Need succeeds best is when the Cranberries stick at what they know, resulting in a number of charmers like "Twenty One," the uilleann pipes-touched "Daffodil's Lament," [...] and the evocative "Disappointment"."[11]

Legacy[edit]

On 5 August 1995, Billboard stated that No Need To Argue was the largest seller of albums since its release, with 5.1 million copies sold in six months.[22] On 10 March 1996, the Cranberries won a Juno Awards for Best-Selling Album.[23] In 2009, No Need To Argue was ranked No. 90 on Billboard magazine: "300 Best-Selling Albums of All Time".[24][25] In July 2014, Guitar World placed No Need to Argue at No. 41 in their "Superunknown: 50 Iconic Albums That Defined 1994" list.[26]

Track listing[edit]

All lyrics are written by Dolores O'Riordan; all music is composed by O'Riordan and Noel Hogan, except where noted.

No.TitleMusicLength
1."Ode to My Family" 4:30
2."I Can't Be with You" 3:07
3."Twenty One" 3:07
4."Zombie"O'Riordan5:06
5."Empty" 3:26
6."Everything I Said" 3:52
7."The Icicle Melts"O'Riordan2:54
8."Disappointment" 4:14
9."Ridiculous Thoughts" 4:31
10."Dreaming My Dreams"O'Riordan3:37
11."Yeat's Grave"O'Riordan2:59
12."Daffodil Lament"O'Riordan6:14
13."No Need to Argue"O'Riordan2:54
Total length:50:30
No Need to Argue: The Complete Sessions 1994–1995 (bonus tracks)
No.TitleWriter(s)Length
14."Away" 2:38
15."I Don't Need" 3:32
16."(They Long to Be) Close to You"2:41
17."So Cold in Ireland" 4:45
18."Zombie" (Camel's Hump mix) 7:54
Total length:73:50

2020 No Need To Argue remastered and expanded[edit]

No.TitleLength
14."Yesterday’s Gone" (from MTV Unplugged) 
15."Away" 
16."I Don’t Need" 
17."So Cold in Ireland" 
18."(They Long to Be) Close to You" 
19."Zombie" (A Camel’s Hump Remix by The Orb) 
CD 2 – Demos + live tracks
No.TitleLength
1."Song to My Family" (Magic Shop Demo) 
2."So Cold in Ireland" (Magic Shop Demo) 
3."Empty" (Magic Shop Demo) 
4."Ridiculous Thoughts" (Magic Shop Demo) 
5."Everything I Said" (Magic Shop Demo) 
6."Yeats’ Grave" (Magic Shop Demo) 
7."Serious" (Demo) 
8."Away" (Demo) 
9."I Don’t Need" (Demo) 
10."Dreaming My Dreams" (Live at the Liverpool Royal Court, 14 October 1994) 
11."Daffodil Lament" (Live at the Liverpool Royal Court, 14 October 1994) 
12."The Icicle Melts" (Live at the Liverpool Royal Court, 14 October 1994) 
13."No Need to Argue" (Live at the Liverpool Royal Court, 14 October 1994) 
14."Empty" (Live at the Liverpool Royal Court, 14 October 1994) 
15."I Can’t Be with You" (Live at the National Stadium, Milton Keynes, 30 July 1995) 
16."Ridiculous Thoughts" (Live at the National Stadium, Milton Keynes, 30 July 1995) 
17."Zombie" (Live at the National Stadium, Milton Keynes, 30 July 1995) 

Personnel[edit]

  • Dolores O'Riordan – vocals, electric and acoustic guitars, keyboards
  • Noel Hogan – electric and acoustic guitars
  • Mike Hogan – bass guitar
  • Fergal Lawler – drums and percussion

Soundtracks[edit]

  • "Away" was featured in the 1995 film Clueless.
  • "Ridiculous Thoughts", "Away", "I Don't Need" and "No Need to Argue" were featured in the British film Butterfly Kiss.[27]
  • "Ode to My Family", "Empty" and "Dreaming My Dreams" were featured in episodes of the American TV series Party of Five.
  • "No Need to Argue" was featured in the closing credits of the 2014 ITV drama show Prey.

Chart positions[edit]

Certifications and sales[edit]

Region Certification Certified units/sales
Argentina (CAPIF)[50] Platinum 60,000^
Australia (ARIA)[51] 5× Platinum 350,000^
Austria (IFPI Austria)[52] Platinum 50,000*
Belgium (BEA)[53] 2× Platinum 100,000*
Canada (Music Canada)[54] 5× Platinum 500,000^
Finland (Musiikkituottajat)[55] Gold 31,876[55]
France (SNEP)[57] Diamond 1,555,400[56]
Germany (BVMI)[58] Platinum 500,000^
Indonesia
combined sales of first two albums
170,000[59]
Malaysia
combined sales of first two albums
150,000[59]
Mexico
combined sales of first two albums
200,000[59]
Netherlands (NVPI)[60] Platinum 100,000^
New Zealand (RMNZ)[61] Platinum 15,000^
Poland (ZPAV)[62] Platinum 100,000*
Spain (PROMUSICAE)[63] 3× Platinum 300,000^
Sweden (GLF)[64] Platinum 100,000^
Switzerland (IFPI Switzerland)[65] Platinum 50,000^
United Kingdom (BPI)[66] 3× Platinum 900,000^
United States (RIAA)[67] 7× Platinum 7,000,000^
Summaries
Europe (IFPI)[69] 5× Platinum 5,500,000[68]
Worldwide 17,000,000[7]

* Sales figures based on certification alone.
^ Shipments figures based on certification alone.

References[edit]

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