Nobody's Sweetheart Now

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"Nobody's Sweetheart Now"
Song
Published 1924
Songwriter(s) Gus Kahn and Ernie Erdman
Composer(s) Billy Meyers and Elmer Schoebel
1924 sheet music cover, Mills Music, New York.

"Nobody's Sweetheart", also known as "Nobody's Sweetheart Now" and "You're Nobody's Sweetheart Now", is a popular song, written in 1924, with music by Billy Meyers and Elmer Schoebel, and lyrics by Gus Kahn and Ernie Erdman. The song is a jazz and pop standard.

Background[edit]

The song was introduced by Ted Lewis in the Broadway revue The Passing Show of 1923.[1] The song was duly published in 1924 by Mills Music in New York by Jack Mills. It was first recorded on February 22, 1924 by Isham Jones and his Orchestra and released on Brunswick Records as a 78 single.[2]

Joel Whitburn assessed the early popular recordings of the song as being by Isham Jones (1924); Red Nichols (1928); Paul Whiteman (1930); Cab Calloway (1931); and by The Mills Brothers (1931).[3]

Other recordings[edit]

The song is a jazz and pop standard recorded by the following musicians:

Film appearances[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fuller, Bill. "In Tune". earlyjas.org. Retrieved September 17, 2017. 
  2. ^ Nobody's Sweetheart Now. Second Hand Songs.
  3. ^ Whitburn, Joel (1986). Joel Whitburn's Pop Memories 1890-1954. Wisconsin, USA: Record Research Inc. p. 559. ISBN 0-89820-083-0. 
  4. ^ Rayno, Don (2003). Paul Whiteman: Pioneer in American Music Vol. 1: 1890-1930. Maryland, USA: Scarecrow Press. p. 671. ISBN 0-8108-4579-2. 
  5. ^ "45worlds.com". 45worlds.com. Retrieved September 18, 2017. 
  6. ^ "The Online Discographical Project". 78discography.com. Retrieved September 18, 2017. 
  7. ^ "Discogs.com". Discogs.com. Retrieved September 18, 2017. 
  8. ^ "A Bing Crosby Discography". BING magazine. International Club Crosby. Retrieved September 17, 2017. 
  9. ^ "45cat.com". 45cat.com. Retrieved September 18, 2017. 
  10. ^ "Discogs.com". Discogs.com. Retrieved September 18, 2017. 
  11. ^ "Discogs.com". Discogs.com. Retrieved September 18, 2017. 

External reference[edit]