Nobukazu Teranishi

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Nobukazu Teranishi (寺西 信一, Teranishi Nobukazu, born 1953[1]) is a Japanese engineer who researches image sensors, and is known for inventing the pinned photodiode, a component of modern digital cameras. He was one of four recipients of the 2017 Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering. As of 2017, he is a professor at the University of Hyogo and at Shizuoka University.[1]

Biography[edit]

Teranishi studied physics at the University of Tokyo.[1] He joined NEC Corporation in 1978, where he invented the pinned photodiode in 1980; the device was named in 1984. The pinned photodiode is a development of the charge-coupled device (CCD) imager. It has improved efficiency compared with the CCD, resulting in reduced pixel size and higher image resolution. It remains an important component of digital camera technology.[1][2][3] Teranishi continued to work for NEC Corporation until 2000, when he moved to Panasonic Corporation (until 2013). As of 2017, he is a professor at the University of Hyogo and at Shizuoka University in Japan.[1]

Awards[edit]

Teranishi received the Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering in 2017, with Michael Tompsett, Eric Fossum and George Smith.[1][2] His earlier awards include medals from the British Royal Photographic Society (2010) and the Photographic Society of America (2011), the Yamazaki Teiichi Award (2013)[1] and the J.J. Ebers Award of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE; 2013).[4] He is a fellow of the IEEE.[3]

Selected publications[edit]

  • N. Teranishi, A. Kohono, Y. Ishihara, E. Oda, K. Arai (1982). No image lag photodiode structure in the interline CCD image sensor. Proc IEDM (Electron Devices Meeting, 1982 International, 13–15 December 1982): 324–27 doi:10.1109/IEDM.1982.190285

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Professor Nobukazu Teranishi, Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering, 1 February 2017, retrieved 3 February 2017
  2. ^ a b Pallab Ghosh (1 February 2017), £1m Queen Elizabeth Prize: Digital camera tech lauded, BBC, retrieved 3 February 2017
  3. ^ a b Samuel K. Moore (2 February 2017), Four IEEE Fellows Share Queen Elizabeth Prize for Digital Cameras, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, retrieved 3 February 2017
  4. ^ J.J. Ebers Award, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, retrieved 3 February 2017