Noor Tagouri

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Noor Tagouri
Noor Tagouri podcast 2018.png
Tagouri in 2018
Born (1993-11-27) November 27, 1993 (age 26)
West Virginia, United States
Citizenship
  • Libyan
  • American
EducationUniversity of Maryland
OccupationActivist, Model, Journalist

Noor Tagouri (born November 27, 1993) is a Libyan American journalist, activist, motivational speaker and producer of the documentary series on the mistreatment of people with mental disabilities titled The Trouble They've Seen: The Forest Haven Story[1], and of a podcast-series on sex trafficking in the U.S. titled Sold in America: Inside Our Nation's Sex Trade.[2] In 2016, she became the first Hijab wearing Muslim woman to appear in an issue of Playboy magazine.[3][4]

Education[edit]

Tagouri attended Prince George's Community College from 2010-2011. She also holds a Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree from the University of Maryland, with a major in broadcast journalism and a minor in international development and conflict management.[5]

Career[edit]

Tagouri started her broadcasting career in June 2012 working as an intern with the CBS Radio. After the death of Freddie Grey in 2015, a local Maryland TV station sent her to cover protests in Baltimore. She also worked for CTV News as a reporter for almost 2 years. In June 2016, she joined Newsy, an online video news site based in Washington, D.C., as an anchor and producer. She initiated a social media campaign in December 2012 called LetNoorShine. [6]. Tagouri's reporting has faced critique for being "myopic", "sheltered and completely alienated from the realities of capitalism". [7].

Podcasts[edit]

Tagouri's podcast Sold in America gave a window into the sex trade industry in the United States.[8]. Leading trans activist Avery Edison critiqued Tagouri's podcast heavily, citing it as "wall-to-wall anti-sex work propaganda" and "'Sold in America'” is less an interesting and informative exploration of the sex trade, and more a portrait of a young woman’s naïveté, credulousness, and lack of self-awareness." [9].

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Washingtonpost.com: Invisible Lives". www.washingtonpost.com. Retrieved March 26, 2019.
  2. ^ National, Scripps. "'Sold in America' docuseries: A look inside our nation's sex trade". NBC. Retrieved November 25, 2018.
  3. ^ About, Her. "Libyan American Journalist Noor Tagouri On Wearing The Hijab And The Power Of Identity". AboutHer. Retrieved November 23, 2018.
  4. ^ Barylo, William (July 20, 2017). Young Muslim Change-Makers: Grassroots Charities Rethinking Modern Societies. Routledge. ISBN 9781351681643.
  5. ^ Fox, MeiMei. "Hijab-Wearing Journalist Noor Tagouri On Why You Should Be Unapologetically Yourself". Forbes. Retrieved November 23, 2018.
  6. ^ Elidrissi, Rajaa. "This young professional turned a viral Facebook photo into a dream job". CNBC. Retrieved November 23, 2018.
  7. ^ Edison, Avery. "Twitter".
  8. ^ McCollum, Galady. ""Sold in America:" Bringing New Awareness to Sex Trafficking in the United States". Komorebi Post. Retrieved November 23, 2018.
  9. ^ Edison, Avery. "Twitter".