Nordic Council of Ministers

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Stylised circular motif of a white swan on a blue background
Flag
Member states and regions of the Nordic Council of Ministers (blue).
Member states and regions of the Nordic Council of Ministers (blue).
Secretariat HeadquarterDenmark Copenhagen
Official languages
TypeIntergovernmental organisation
Membership
Leaders
• Presidency of the Nordic Council of Ministers
Denmark Denmark

Greenland Greenland

Faroe Islands Faroe Islands
• Secretary-General of the Nordic Council of Ministers
Finland Paula Lehtomäki
Establishment
• Nordic Council inaugurated
12 February 1953
1 July 1962
• Nordic Council of Ministers and Secretariat inaugurated
Jul 1971
Population
• 2018 estimate
27,210,000
Currency
Website
norden.org

In 1971, the Nordic Council of Ministers, an intergovernmental forum, was established as a result of the Helsinki Treaty.[1] The purpose of the Nordic Council of Ministers is to complement the Nordic Council and promote Nordic Cooperation.

Structure[edit]

The governments of the Nordic Countries each have a Minister for Nordic Cooperation.[2][3] This responsibility often goes to the Minister of Foreign Affairs or another ministerial post that the Nordic country has a special desire for cooperation. These Ministers for Nordic Cooperation delegate meetings for other Ministers to discuss avenues for cooperation in the minister's respective fields, thus the Ministers for Cooperation set up Ministerial Councils. Hence the name, Council of Ministers.

Short Code: Nordic Council of ministers for:
MR-SAM Cooperation
MR-A Labour
MR-VÆKST Sustainable Growth
MR-FJLS Fisheries, Aquaculture, Agriculture, Food and Forestry
MR-JÄM Gender Equality
MR-K Culture
MR-LAG Legislative Affairs
MR-MK Environment and Climate
MR-S Health and Social Affairs
MR-U Education and Research
MR-FINANS Finance
MR-DIGITAL Digitalisation 2017-2020

Cooperation with other International Organizations[edit]

The Council and the Council of Ministers are involved in various forms of cooperation with neighbouring areas, amongst them being the Baltic Assembly and the Benelux, as well as Russia and Schleswig-Holstein.[4] The Council of Ministers has offices in the following countries:

 Estonia
  • Tallinn (Head office)[5]
  • Tartu (Branch office)[5]
  • Narva (Branch office)[5]
 Latvia Riga[6]
 Lithuania Vilnius[7]

Closed offices[8]

 Russia
  • St. Petersburg (Office)
  • Kaliningrad (Office)
  • Petrozavodsk (Contact center)
  • Arkhangelsk (Contact center)
  • Murmansk (Information center)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Helsinki Treaty | Nordic cooperation" (PDF). www.norden.org. Retrieved 31 March 2020.
  2. ^ "Ministers for Co-operation (MR-SAM) | Nordic cooperation". www.norden.org. Retrieved 31 March 2020.
  3. ^ Opitz, Christian; Etzold, Tobias (January 2018). "Seeking Renewed Relevance -Institutions of Nordic Cooperation in the Reform Process" (PDF). German Institute for International and Security Affairs. Retrieved 31 March 2020.
  4. ^ "Initiatives by the Ministers for Nordic Co-operation | Nordic cooperation". www.norden.org. Retrieved 31 March 2020.
  5. ^ a b c "Contact". norden.ee. Retrieved 14 May 2020.
  6. ^ "Homepage". Ziemeļu Ministru padomes birojs Latvijā. Retrieved 14 May 2020.
  7. ^ "About us". Šiaurės ministrų tarybos biuras Lietuvoje. Retrieved 14 May 2020.
  8. ^ "Nordic countries close offices in Russia". Barentsobserver. Retrieved 14 May 2020.