Nordic House (Iceland)

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The Nordic House in Reykjavík

The Nordic House (Icelandic: Norræna húsið) in Reykjavík is a cultural institution opened in 1968 and operated by the Nordic Council of Ministers. Its goal is to foster and support cultural connections between Iceland and the other Nordic countries. To this end the Nordic House organizes a diverse program of cultural events and exhibitions. It is the venue for several events in the Icelandic cultural calendar: the Reykjavík International Film and Literary Festivals, Iceland Airwaves and The Nordic Fashion Biennale.

The Nordic House maintains a library that is unique in Iceland because of its architecture and design by Alvar Aalto and its collection of over 30,000 items in seven Nordic languages, though not including Icelandic. Library users may loan books, eBooks, films, magazines and graphic art by Nordic artists from the Artotek, use the Internet, study or have a cup of coffee and read a range of Nordic newspapers that are flown in daily.

In addition, the Nordic House has a shop for Nordic design, exhibition space and auditoriums. Dill Restaurant was also originally located there; the current restaurant is AALTO Bistro, which serves fresh, local food in New Nordic style. The chef is Sveinn Kjartansson.

The Nordic House was designed by the Finnish modernist architect Alvar Aalto. One of his later works, it features most of Aalto's signature traits: for example, the organic shape of the ridgeline of the ultramarine-tiled roof, echoing the range of mountains in the distance; the central well in the library; and the extensive use of white, tile and wood throughout the building. Aalto also designed most of the furnishings in most of his buildings. In the Nordic House, all installed furnishings, lamps and almost all of the furniture are by Aalto.

The Director is Mikkel Harder.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Om húsið: Starfsfólk og stjórn", Nordic House, retrieved 15 June 2017 (in Icelandic).

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 64°08′17″N 21°56′49″W / 64.1381°N 21.9469°W / 64.1381; -21.9469