Nordic combined at the 2006 Winter Olympics – Team

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Team
at the XX Olympic Winter Games
Nordic combined pictogram.svg
Pictogram for Nordic combined
Venue Pragelato
Dates February 15–16
Competitors 44 from 11 nations
Winning time 49:42.6
Medalists
1st, gold medalist(s)  Austria
Christoph Bieler, Felix Gottwald, Michael Gruber, Mario Stecher
2nd, silver medalist(s)  Germany
Ronny Ackermann, Jens Gaiser, Georg Hettich, Björn Kircheisen
3rd, bronze medalist(s)  Finland
Anssi Koivuranta, Antti Kuisma, Hannu Manninen, Jaakko Tallus
← 2002
2010 →

The Men's team Nordic combined competition for the 2006 Winter Olympics was held in Pragelato, Italy. It was originally scheduled for 15 February, but high winds meant that only part of the ski jumping competition was completed on that day, with the conclusion, and the cross-country race, taking place on 16 February.[1]

Results[edit]

Ski Jumping[edit]

Each of the four team members, performed two jumps, which were judged in the same fashion as the Olympic ski jumping competition. The scores for all the jumps each team took were summed, and used to calculate their deficit in the cross-country race. Each one point behind the leading score of Germany was equivalent to one second of time deficit.[2] Heavy winds delayed the competition after the first round of jumps; these jumps eventually counted, and the competition was resumed the following day. The world championship team from Norway had to pull out of the competition, as four of its athletes became sick. Had the competition been restarted, they would have been able to compete with a different group of athletes, but keeping the scores from the first day meant that Norway was out. Italy also had to pull out, when Davide Bresadola was forced to go to hospital on account of illness.[1]

Rank Athlete Run 1 Rank Run 2 Rank Total Deficit
1  Germany
Jens Gaiser
Björn Kircheisen
Ronny Ackermann
Georg Hettich
464.5
114.5
113.7
114.2
125.1
1 449.0
108.7
114.1
109.5
116.7
2 913.5 0:00
2  Austria
Michael Gruber
Mario Stecher
Felix Gottwald
Christoph Bieler
453.4
115.9
108.3
110.5
118.7
2 449.8
109.6
113.5
107.0
119.7
1 903.2 0:10
3  Russia
Dimitry Matveev
Ivan Fesenko
Anton Kamenev
Sergej Maslennikov
450.1
106.8
105.9
106.6
130.8
3 440.0
102.7
103.7
109.6
124.0
3 890.1 0:23
4  Finland
Anssi Koivuranta
Antti Kuisma
Hannu Manninen
Jaakko Tallus
444.7
120.4
97.9
112.5
113.9
4 433.9
108.1
100.1
111.9
113.8
4 878.6 0:35
5  Japan
Yosuke Hatakeyama
Norihito Kobayashi
Takashi Kitamura
Daito Takahashi
437.7
112.4
109.9
105.5
109.9
5 433.9
111.6
111.4
93.6
109.9
5 864.2 0:49
6  France
Francois Braud
Nicolas Bal
Ludovic Roux
Jason Lamy Chappuis
431.9
112.3
93.0
102.7
123.9
6 416.3
93.4
89.1
110.5
123.3
6 848.2 1:05
7  Switzerland
Jan Schmid
Andreas Hurschler
Ronny Heer
Ivan Rieder
427.5
112.8
103.1
111.5
100.1
7 412.1
109.4
90.3
100.5
111.9
7 839.6 1:14
8  United States
Bill Demong
Carl Van Loan
Johnny Spillane
Todd Lodwick
409.9
107.0
82.1
112.8
108.0
8 410.7
111.0
82.1
105.4
112.2
8 820.6 1:33
9  Czech Republic
Ales Vodsedalek
Tomas Slavik
Ladislav Rygl
Pavel Churavy
396.3
98.7
99.0
96.6
102.0
9 408.8
109.0
99.6
99.9
100.3
9 805.1 1:48
 Italy
Davide Bresadola
Jochen Strobl
Daniele Munari
Giuseppe Michielli
393.9
111.4
88.5
89.8
104.2
10 DNS
 Norway
Havard Klemetsen
Kristian Hammer
Magnus Moan
Petter Tande
DNS

Cross-Country[edit]

The start for the 4 x 5 kilometre relay race was staggered, with a one-point deficit in the ski jump portion resulting in a one second deficit in starting the cross-country course. This stagger meant that the first team across the finish line, Austria was the overall winner of the event. The German team, which started first, led after the third relay leg, but Austria's Mario Stecher gained 36 seconds on Germany's Jens Gaiser on the final leg, taking the Austrian team to the gold medal.[2]

Rank Athlete Deficit Time Rank Total
1Gold medal icon.svg  Austria
Michael Gruber
Christoph Bieler
Felix Gottwald
Mario Stecher
+0:10 49:42.6
11:50.3
13:01.0
12:01.4
12:49.9
1 49:52.6
2Silver medal icon.svg  Germany
Björn Kircheisen
Georg Hettich
Ronny Ackermann
Jens Gaiser
+0:00 50:07.9
11:23.9
12:50.4
12:27.6
13:26.0
4 +0:15.3
3Bronze medal icon.svg  Finland
Antti Kuisma
Anssi Koivuranta
Jaakko Tallus
Hannu Manninen
+0:35 49:44.4
11:56.8
13:01.0
12:25.5
12:21.1
2 +0:26.8
4  Switzerland
Ronny Heer
Jan Schmid
Andreas Hurschler
Ivan Rieder
+1:14 50:00.9
11:42.5
13:23.0
12:02.5
12:52.9
3 +1:22.3
5  France
Francois Braud
Ludovic Roux
Jason Lamy Chappuis
Nicolas Bal
+1:05 50:19.6
12:09.2
12:49.6
12:23.6
12:57.2
6 +1:32.0
6  Japan
Daito Takahashi
Takashi Kitamura
Norihito Kobayashi
Yosuke Hatakeyama
+0:49 50:47.0
12:02.5
12:49.5
12:33.7
13:21.3
7 +1:43.4
7  United States
Johnny Spillane
Carl Van Loan
Bill Demong
Todd Lodwick
+1:33 50:19.5
11:53.2
13:20.9
12:24.2
12:41.2
5 +1:59.9
8  Czech Republic
Ladislav Rygl
Pavel Churavy
Ales Vodsedalek
Tomas Slavik
+1:48 52:10.5
12:33.7
12:38.2
13:15.8
13:42.8
8 +4:05.9
9  Russia
Ivan Fesenko
Anton Kamenev
Dimitry Matveev
Sergej Maslennikov
+0:23 53:42.1
12:38.0
13:52.4
13:18.5
13:53.2
9 +4:12.5

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Janie McCauley (February 16, 2006). "Germany Leads Nordic Combined; U.S. Eighth". Associated Press. SFGate.com. Retrieved June 2, 2009. [dead link]
  2. ^ a b "Torino 2006 Official Report - NordicCombined" (PDF). Torino Organizing Committee. LA84 Foundation. March 2009. Retrieved June 2, 2009.