Norelgestromin

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Norelgestromin
Norelgestromin.svg
Clinical data
AHFS/Drugs.com International Drug Names
MedlinePlus a602006
Routes of
administration
Transdermal patch
Legal status
Legal status
  • ℞ (Prescription only)
Identifiers
CAS Number 53016-31-2 N
ATC code G03AA13 (WHO) (only combinations with estrogens)
PubChem CID 62930
DrugBank DB06713 YesY
ChemSpider 56648 YesY
UNII R0TAY3X631 YesY
KEGG D05205 YesY
ChEBI CHEBI:111762 N
ChEMBL CHEMBL1200807 N
Synonyms 17-Deacetylnorgestimate, levonorgestrel 3-oxime
Chemical data
Formula C21H29NO2
Molar mass 327.461 g/mol
 NYesY (what is this?)  (verify)

Norelgestromin (INN, USAN, BAN), or norelgestromine, also known as 17-deacetylnorgestimate or levonorgestrel 3-oxime,[1] is a steroidal progestin of the 19-nortestosterone group used in the contraceptive patch called Evra or Ortho Evra, where it is combined with the estrogen ethinyl estradiol.[2][3] It is one of the active metabolites of norgestimate.[4][5] Unlike many other 19-nortestosterone derivatives, norelgestromin has negligible androgenic activity.[5] The drug was introduced in 2002.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ IARC Working Group on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans; World Health Organization; International Agency for Research on Cancer (2007). Combined Estrogen-progestogen Contraceptives and Combined Estrogen-progestogen Menopausal Therapy. World Health Organization. pp. 150–151. ISBN 978-92-832-1291-1. 
  2. ^ Drugs.com: Norelgestromin/Ethinyl Estradiol Patch
  3. ^ Crosignani, Pier Giorgio; Nappi, Carmine; Ronsini, Salvatore; Bruni, Vincenzina; Marelli, Silvia; Sonnino, Davide (2009). "Satisfaction and compliance in hormonal contraception: the result of a multicentre clinical study on women's experience with the ethinylestradiol/norelgestromin contraceptive patch in Italy". BMC Women's Health 9 (1). doi:10.1186/1472-6874-9-18. ISSN 1472-6874. 
  4. ^ Annette M. Doherty (2003). Annual Reports in Medicinal Chemistry. Academic Press. pp. 362–. ISBN 978-0-12-040538-1. 
  5. ^ a b Stefan Offermanns; Walter Rosenthal (14 August 2008). Encyclopedia of Molecular Pharmacology. Springer Science & Business Media. pp. 391–. ISBN 978-3-540-38916-3. 
  6. ^ John E. Macor (2012). Annual Reports in Medicinal Chemistry. Academic Press. pp. 620–. ISBN 978-0-12-396492-2.