Norfolk Constabulary

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Norfolk Constabulary
England - Norfolk Constabulary Logo.png
Common nameNorfolk Police
MottoOur Priority is You
Agency overview
Formed1839
Preceding agencies
Employees1,602 police officers March 2020[1] 1,166 police staff
Volunteers193 special constables 138 police volunteers March 2020[1]
Jurisdictional structure
Operations jurisdictionNorfolk, England, UK
England Police Forces (Norfolk).svg
Map of police area
Size2,079 square miles (5,380 km2)[2]
Population908,000[2]
Legal jurisdictionEngland & Wales
Constituting instrument
General nature
Operational structure
Overviewed by
HeadquartersWymondham
Constables
  • 1,602 police officers March 2020[1]
  • 193 special constables
Police and Crime Commissioner responsible
Agency executive
  • Paul Sandford, Chief Constable
Website
www.norfolk.police.uk Edit this at Wikidata

Norfolk Constabulary is the territorial police force responsible for the county of Norfolk in England. In March 2020, the force had a strength of 1,602 police officers, 193 special constables, 1,166 police staff, and 138 volunteers.[1] The force serves a population of 908,000 in an area of 2,079 square miles (5,380 km2).[2]

In October 2017, Norfolk Constabulary announced plans to save money and became the first police force in England & Wales to remove the role of Police Community Support Officer.[3]

History[edit]

Norfolk Constabulary was founded in 1839 under the County Police Act 1839, and was one of the first county forces to be formed.

In 1965, it had an establishment of 636 officers and an actual strength of 529.[4] In 1968 it amalgamated with Norwich City Police and Great Yarmouth Borough Police to form the Norfolk Joint Constabulary. In 1974, it returned to the name Norfolk Constabulary.

21st century[edit]

Norfolk Police car

Proposals made by the Home Secretary on 20 March 2006 would see the force merge with neighbouring forces Cambridgeshire Constabulary and Suffolk Constabulary to form a strategic police force for East Anglia.[5] The Norfolk Police Authority was enthusiastic for the merger, but the neighbouring forces were not. With the announcement in July 2006 by the Home Office that the principle of merger was under review, the Norfolk Constabulary announced their intention to recruit a permanent Chief Constable, a process that they had delayed while merger was likely.

On 2 January 2007, Ian McPherson became the new Chief Constable of Norfolk Constabulary. Originally from Lancashire, his previous position was Deputy Chief Constable of North Yorkshire Police.[citation needed]

In 2008, the force changed uniforms to black combat style trousers with a polo shirt but reverted to the more traditional white shirt and tie on a trial basis in November 2012.[6] It has since reverted to the polo shirt.

In 2018, Norfolk abolished its use of PCSOs and made all of its remaining PCSOs redundant.[7][8]

Chief constables[edit]

Officers killed in the line of duty[edit]

The Police Roll of Honour Trust and Police Memorial Trust list and commemorate all British police officers killed in the line of duty. Since its establishment in 1984, the Police Memorial Trust has erected 50 memorials nationally to some of those officers.

The following officers of Norfolk Constabulary are just two[clarification needed] of those from the force that have been killed in the line of duty:[12]

  • PC Charles William Alger, 1909 (shot)
  • PC Robert Craig Orr McLaren, 1981 (his vehicle crashed during a police pursuit)

Governance[edit]

Since 2021, the force has been overseen by military veteran Giles Orpen-Smellie (Conservative) who is the Norfolk Police and Crime Commissioner.[13] Since 2021, the Chief Constable is Paul Sandford.[11]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "ANNUAL REPORT 2019/20" (PDF). Norfolk Police and Crime Commissioner. 8 December 2020. Retrieved 30 April 2021.
  2. ^ a b c d "Norfolk Constabulary". HMICFRS. Retrieved 27 September 2021.
  3. ^ Sian.Brooks (29 March 2018). "Police Chief pays tribute to PCSOs as 2020 plans take effect". Norfolk Constabulary. Retrieved 8 October 2018.
  4. ^ The Thin Blue Line, Police Council for Great Britain Staff Side Claim for Undermanning Supplements, 1965
  5. ^ "UK | UK Politics | Police forces 'to be cut to 24'". BBC News. 20 March 2006. Archived from the original on 12 March 2007. Retrieved 25 January 2016.
  6. ^ "Norfolk police uniform shirts set for switch". BBC News. 20 November 2012. Archived from the original on 25 September 2015. Retrieved 25 January 2016.
  7. ^ "Abolition of PCSOs plan going ahead". 29 March 2018. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
  8. ^ "Police force that axed PCSOs takes on zero-hours 'scene guards'". TheGuardian.com. 7 February 2019.
  9. ^ "Chief Constable Norfolk County Constabulary 1909-1915". 25 January 2016. Retrieved 19 June 2018.
  10. ^ "Captain Stephen Hugh Van Neck CVO, MC, Chief Constable, Norfolk (1928–1956)". ARTUK. Retrieved 19 June 2018.
  11. ^ a b Moxon, Daniel (1 July 2021). "Vow to make police 'visible and accessible' on new chief's first day". Eastern Daily Press. Retrieved 27 September 2021.
  12. ^ Lest we Forget. Norfolk Constabulary, 5 December 2006. Internet Archive. Retrieved 2 February 2016.
  13. ^ "Giles Orpen-Smellie delighted to become Norfolk's new PCC". Norfolk PCC. Retrieved 27 September 2021.

Bibliography[edit]

  • A Movable Rambling Police: An Official History of Policing in Norfolk, by Brian David Butcher published by the Norfolk Constabulary and printed in King's Lynn in 1989 no ISBN

External links[edit]