Norfolk Tides

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Norfolk Tides
Founded in 1961
Norfolk, Virginia
NorfolkTides16.png NorfolkTidesCap16.png
Team logo Cap insignia
Minor league affiliations
ClassTriple-A (1969–present)
Previous classesClass A (1961–1968)
LeagueTriple-A East (2021–present)
DivisionSoutheast Division
Previous leagues
Major league affiliations
TeamBaltimore Orioles (2007–present)
Previous teams
Minor league titles
Class titles (1)1983
League titles (6)
  • 1965
  • 1972
  • 1975
  • 1982
  • 1983
  • 1985
Division titles (5)
  • 1988
  • 1995
  • 2001
  • 2005
  • 2015
Team data
NameNorfolk Tides (1993–present)
Previous names
  • Tidewater Tides (1963–1992)
  • Portsmouth-Norfolk Tides (1961–1962)
ColorsGreen, black, orange, gray, sea foam
         
MascotsRip Tide and Triton[1]
BallparkHarbor Park (1993–present)
Previous parks
Owner(s)/
Operator(s)
Maryland Baseball Holding, LLC
PresidentKen Young[2]
General ManagerJoe Gregory[2]
ManagerGary Kendall

The Norfolk Tides are a Minor League Baseball team of the Triple-A East and the Triple-A affiliate of the Baltimore Orioles. They are located in Norfolk, Virginia, and are named in nautical reference to the city's location on the Chesapeake Bay. The team plays their home games at Harbor Park, which opened in 1993. The Tides previously played at High Rock Park in 1961 and 1962, Frank D. Lawrence Stadium from 1961 to 1969, and at Met Park from its opening in 1970 until the end of the 1992 season.

Originally known as the Portsmouth-Norfolk Tides, the team began play in 1961 as members of the Class A South Atlantic League. In 1963, they joined the Class A Carolina League and became known as the Tidewater Tides, taking their geographic identifier from the Tidewater region. The Tides were replaced by a Triple-A International League team in 1969. The Triple-A Tides carried on the history of the Class A team that preceded them. The club rebranded as the Norfolk Tides in 1993. In conjunction with Major League Baseball's reorganization of Minor League Baseball in 2021, the Tides were placed in the Triple-A East.

The team has won six league championships in its history. They won the Carolina League championship in 1965 as the Class A affiliate of the Chicago White Sox. During their 38-year Triple-A affiliation with the New York Mets from 1969 to 2006, they won the Governors' Cup, the championship of the International League, on five occasions (1972, 1975, 1982, 1983, and 1985) and won the Triple-A World Series in 1983.

History[edit]

Before the Tides[edit]

Both Norfolk and Portsmouth, Virginia, first hosted professional baseball teams in the late 19th century.[3][4] Among the clubs to hail from these neighboring cities were the Norfolk Tars, which played on and off from 1906 to 1955 primarily in the Virginia League and Piedmont League; the Portsmouth Truckers, which played at intervals from 1895 to 1935 mostly in the Virginia League; the Portsmouth Cubs of the Piedmont League from 1936 to 1952; and the Portsmouth Merrimacs also of the Piedmont League from 1953 to 1955.[3][4] The Tars folded in July 1955 due to low attendance and steep financial losses.[5] Fiscal problems also caused the Merrimacs to cease operations after the 1955 campaign.[6][7]

South Atlantic League (1961–1962)[edit]

Six years after the loss of the Tars and Merrimacs, the Portsmouth-Norfolk Tides were established as members of the Class A South Atlantic League.[4] They played some home games at Frank D. Lawrence Stadium in Portsmouth and some at High Rock Park in Norfolk.[8][9] The Tides had a limited affiliation with Major League Baseball's Kansas City Athletics.[10] Their inaugural season opener was a 7–4 victory in Portsmouth over the Charlotte Hornets with 3,158 people in attendance on April 17, 1961.[11] In 1962, they became an affiliate of the St. Louis Cardinals.[12] The Tides dropped out of the Sally League after losing their working agreement with St. Louis and following what Tides general manager Marshall Fox called "unfair treatment" by the league.[13]

Carolina League (1963–1968)[edit]

The Carolina League, a Class A circuit, accepted the Tides as members for 1963.[14] At this point, the team became known as the Tidewater Tides, taking their geographic identifier from the Tidewater region, and began playing their home games exclusively at Lawrence Stadium in Portsmouth.[4][8] They were not affiliated with any Major League Baseball team in their first Carolina League season.[15]

The Tides became the Class A affiliate of the Chicago White Sox in 1964. Under manager Allen Jones, they qualified for the playoffs that year for the first time in team history and defeated the Kinston Eagles in the semifinals to advance to the championship round where they lost to the Winston-Salem Red Sox.[16] Outfielder Ed Stroud won the league's Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award.[17] Jones led the team back to the postseason in 1965. After defeating the Peninsula Grays in the semifinals, the Tides won the Carolina League championship by sweeping the Durham Bulls, 2–0.[18]

Tidewater became an affiliate of the Philadelphia Phillies in 1966.[19] They made the postseason in 1967 and 1968, but they were defeated in the finals by Durham in 1967 and eliminated in the quarterfinals by the Raleigh-Durham Mets in 1968.[20][21]

International League[edit]

New York Mets (1969–2006)[edit]

In 1969, the New York Mets moved their Triple-A International League (IL) affiliate, the Jacksonville Suns, from Jacksonville, Florida, to Portsmouth as the Tidewater Tides.[22] The team was operated by Tidewater Professional Sports and owned by the Mets.[23] The Triple-A Tides carried on the history of the Class A team that preceded them.[23]

International League Manager of the Year Clyde McCullough led the team to a league-best 76–59 record in their first Triple-A season, but they were eliminated in the semifinals of the Governors' Cup playoffs to determine the IL championship.[24][25] The 1969 season was the team's last at Lawrence Stadium.[8] They moved into the new Met Park, located in Norfolk, in 1970.[26] After another semifinal exit that year,[27] the Tides reached the finals in 1971 but lost the championship to the Rochester Red Wings in the full five-game series.[28] Hank Bauer, manager of the 1972 club, led the Tides to win their first Governors' Cup with a 3–2 series defeat of the Louisville Colonels in the finals.[29] Following this win, Tidewater competed in the Kodak World Baseball Championship, a five-team round-robin tournament that included the champions of the American Association (the Evansville Triplets) and Pacific Coast League (the Albuquerque Dukes), the Caribbean All-Stars, and the hosting Hawaii Islanders.[30] The Tides went 3–2 but were eliminated.[30] Bauer was selected as the 1972 IL Manager of the Year.[24] The club returned to the playoffs in 1973 but could not advance past the semifinals.[31]

Tidewater finished atop the league standings in 1974 with an 86–55 record under manager Joe Frazier. After sweeping the Charleston Charlies, 3–0, in the semis, they won the IL championship over the Syracuse Chiefs, 3–1.[32] Afterwards, they met the Evansville Triplets, champions of the American Association, in the Junior World Series, which the Tides lost, 4–1.[30] The Tides swept the 1975 International League year-end awards with outfielder Mike Vail as the IL MVP and Rookie of the Year, Craig Swan as the Most Valuable Pitcher, and Frazier as Manager of the Year.[24]

Davey Johnson led the Tides to win the 1983 IL championship and the Triple-A World Series.

They next appeared in the postseason in 1977, 1979, and 1981, but they were unable to move on past the semifinals.[33][34][35] During this stretch, Juan Berenguer won the 1978 Most Valuable Pitcher Award, and outfielder Mookie Wilson won the 1979 Rookie of the Year Award.[24] Tidewater won back-to-back Governors' Cups in 1982 and 1983. Jack Aker's 1982 club swept the Columbus Clippers, 3–0, in the semifinals and did the same against Rochester in the finals.[36] Under Davey Johnson in 1983, the Tides dispatched Columbus in the semis, and then won a second consecutive IL title over the Richmond Braves.[37] That postseason, the Tides, the American Association champion Denver Bears, and Pacific Coast League champion Portland Beavers contested the Triple-A World Series, a round-robin tournament to crown an overall champion of the classification. Tidewater won the series, 3–1.[30] Walt Terrell was the IL's Most Valuable Pitcher for 1973.[24]

In 1985, Bob Schaefer led the team to its sixth and final Governors' Cup championship with a semifinal victory over the Maine Guides and a finals win over Columbus.[38] Though the Tides would remain members of the International League for the next 35 years, they were unable to win another league crown. They lost in the semifinals in 1986 and suffered defeats in the finals of both 1987 and 1988.[39][40][41] John Mitchell was selected as the IL Most Valuable Pitcher for 1986.[24] First baseman Randy Milligan won both the 1987 MVP and Rookie of the Year Awards.[24] Third basemen Tom O'Malley (1989) and Jeff Manto (1994) later won IL MVP Awards.[24]

The club went through a season of change from 1992 to 1993. First, in December 1992, the Mets sold the franchise to a group led by Tampa businessman Ken Young.[42] The Triple-A affiliation between the teams remained intact. In 1993, the Tides left Met Park and moved into the new US$16-million Harbor Park.[43] As they moved into the new facility, the team also replaced the "Tidewater" in its name with that of Norfolk.[42] Also in 1993, the Tides introduced their mascot, Rip Tide.[44] The franchise was awarded the 1993 John H. Johnson President's Award, recognizing them as the "complete baseball franchise—based on franchise stability, contributions to league stability, contributions to baseball in the community, and promotion of the baseball industry."[45]

The 1995 Tides led the league with their 86–56 record but were eliminated in the Governors' Cup finals by the Ottawa Lynx.[46] They did, however, win all four IL year-end awards: MVP (third baseman/outfielder Butch Huskey, Most Valuable Pitcher and Rookie of the Year (Jason Isringhausen, and Manager of the Year (Toby Harrah).[24] Norfolk made three more playoff appearances as a Mets affiliate, exiting in the semifinal rounds of 1996, 2001, and 2005.[47][48][49] Mike Fyhrie won the 1996 Most Valuable Pitcher Award, and first baseman Roberto Petagine was the 1997 IL MVP.[24] The 38-year Triple-A affiliation with New York ended after the 2006 season when the Mets elected to affiliate with the New Orleans Zephyrs for 2007.[50]

Baltimore Orioles (2007–2020)[edit]

The Tides have played at Harbor Park since 1993.

Norfolk became the Triple-A affiliate of the Baltimore Orioles in 2007. The Orioles preferred the quality of the facilities at Harbor Park as well as the more favorable weather and proximity of Norfolk compared to their previous location in Ottawa.[51] Maryland Baseball Holding, the Tides' ownership group led by Ken Young, also owned two other Orioles-affiliated teams at the time: the Bowie Baysox and Frederick Keys.[52]

From 2007 to 2014, the Tides regularly finished with losing records and only finished at or above .500 in 2009, 2012, and 2013.[4] The 2015 team, led by IL Manager of the Year Ron Johnson qualified for the Governors' Cup playoffs as winners of the Southern Division title but lost in the semifinals to Columbus in five games.[53] The Tides added a second mascot, a green sea creature named Triton, in 2016.[44] Norfolk continued to post losing seasons from 2016 to 2019.[4] In 2019, first baseman Ryan Mountcastle was selected as the IL MVP.[24] The start of the 2020 season was initially postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic before being cancelled altogether.[54][55]

Triple-A East[edit]

Baltimore Orioles (2021–present)[edit]

Following the 2020 season, Major League Baseball assumed control of Minor League Baseball in a move to increase player salaries, modernize facility standards, and reduce travel.[56] The Tides were organized into the Triple-A East and maintained their affiliation with the Baltimore Orioles.[56] Norfolk ended the season in sixth place in the Southeastern Division with a 48–72 record.[57] No playoffs were held to determine a league champion; instead, the team with the best regular-season record was the declared the winner.[58] However, 10 games that had been postponed from the start of the season were reinserted into the schedule as a postseason tournament called the Triple-A Final Stretch in which all 30 Triple-A clubs competed for the highest winning percentage over that stretch.[58] Norfolk finished the tournament tied for 20th place with a 4–6 record.[59]

Season-by-season records[edit]

Table key
League The team's final position in the league standings
Division The team's final position in the divisional standings
GB Games behind the team that finished in first place in the division that season
Class champions Class champions (1970–present)
League champions League champions (1961–present)
* Division champions (1963–present)
^ Postseason berth (1962–present)
Season-by-season records
Season League Regular season Postseason MLB affiliate Ref.
Record Win % League Division GB Record Win % Result
1961 SAL 66–72 .478 6th 21+12 Kansas City Athletics [60]
1962 SAL 55–85 .393 7th 37+12 St. Louis Cardinals [61]
1963 CL 65–79 .451 8th 4th 12+12 Unaffiliated [62]
1964
^
CL 75–63 .543 5th 2nd 4 2–2 .500 Won semifinals vs. Kinston Eagles, 2–0
Lost CL championship vs. Winston-Salem Red Sox, 2–0[63]
Chicago White Sox [64]
1965
^ League champions
CL 76–68 .528 4th 2nd 10 4–1 .800 Won semifinals vs. Peninsula Grays, 2–1
Won CL championship vs. Durham Bulls, 2–0[65]
Chicago White Sox [66]
1966 CL 58–81 .417 11th 5th 18 Philadelphia Phillies [67]
1967
^
CL 70–68 .507 5th 4th 5 4–2 .667 Won quarterfinals vs. Peninsula Grays, 1–0
Won semifinals vs. Raleigh Pirates, 2–0
Lost CL championship vs. Durham Bulls, 2–1[68]
Philadelphia Phillies [69]
1968
^
CL 80–60 .571 3rd 2nd 3+12 0–1 .000 Lost quarterfinals vs. Raleigh-Durham Mets, 1–0[70] Philadelphia Phillies [71]
1969
^
IL 76–59 .563 1st 3+12 1–3 .250 Lost semifinals vs. Columbus Jets, 3–1[72] New York Mets [73]
1970
^
IL 74–66 .529 4th 10 0–3 .000 Lost semifinals vs. Syracuse Chiefs, 3–0[74] New York Mets [75]
1971
^
IL 79–61 .564 2nd 7 5–3 .625 Won semifinals vs. Charleston Charlies, 3–0
Lost IL championship vs. Rochester Red Wings, 3–2[76]
New York Mets [77]
1972
^ League champions
IL 78–65 .545 3rd 2+12 8–5 .615 Won semifinals vs. Charleston Charlies, 2–1
Won IL championship vs. Louisville Colonels, 3–2[78]
Lost Kodak World Baseball Championship, 3–2[30]
New York Mets [79]
1973
^
IL 75–70 .517 5th 2nd 10 2–3 .400 Lost semifinals vs. Pawtucket Red Sox, 3–2[80] New York Mets [81]
1974 IL 57–82 .410 7th 4th 28+12 New York Mets [82]
1975
^ League champions
IL 86–55 .610 1st 7–5 .583 Won semifinals vs. Charleston Charlies, 3–0
Won IL championship vs. Syracuse Chiefs, 3–1[83]
Lost Junior World Series vs. Evansville Triplets, 4–1[30]
New York Mets [84]
1976 IL 60–78 .435 7th 28 New York Mets [85]
1977
^
IL 73–67 .521 3rd 7 1–3 .250 Lost semifinals vs. Charleston Charlies, 3–1[86] New York Mets [87]
1978 IL 69–71 .493 5th 16 New York Mets [88]
1979
^
IL 73–67 .521 4th 12+12 1–3 .250 Lost semifinals vs. Columbus Clippers, 3–1[89] New York Mets [90]
1980 IL 67–72 .482 6th 15+12 New York Mets [91]
1981
^
IL 70–68 .507 3rd 17+12 2–3 .400 Lost semifinals vs. Richmond Braves, 3–2[92] New York Mets [93]
1982
^ League champions
IL 74–63 .540 3rd 7 6–0 1.000 Won semifinals vs. Columbus Clippers, 3–0
Won IL championship vs. Rochester Red Wings, 3–0[94]
New York Mets [95]
1983
^ League champions Class champions
IL 71–68 .511 4th 11+12 9–4 .692 Won semifinals vs. Columbus Clippers, 3–2
Won IL championship vs. Richmond Braves, 3–1[96]
Won Triple-A World Series vs. Portland Beavers and Denver Bears, 3–1[30]
New York Mets [97]
1984 IL 71–69 .507 5th 11+12 New York Mets [98]
1985
^ League champions
IL 75–64 .540 3rd (tie) 3+12 6–3 .667 Won semifinals vs. Maine Guides, 3–2
Won IL championship vs. Columbus Clippers, 3–1[99]
New York Mets [100]
1986
^
IL 74–66 .529 4th 6 0–3 .000 Lost semifinals vs. Richmond Braves, 3–0[101] New York Mets [102]
1987
^
IL 81–59 .579 1st 3–4 .429 Won semifinals vs. Pawtucket Red Sox, 3–1
Lost IL championship vs. Columbus Clippers, 3–0[103]
New York Mets [104]
1988
*
IL 77–64 .546 1st (tie) 1st 1–3 .250 Won Eastern Division title
Lost IL championship vs. Rochester Red Wings, 3–1[105]
New York Mets [106]
1989 IL 77–69 .527 3rd (tie) 2nd (tie) 4 New York Mets [107]
1990 IL 79–67 .541 3rd 2nd 8 New York Mets [108]
1991 IL 77–65 .542 3rd 2nd 7 New York Mets [109]
1992 IL 56–86 .394 8th 4th 38 New York Mets [110]
1993 IL 70–71 .496 6th 4th 16 New York Mets [111]
1994 IL 67–75 .472 8th 4th 13+12 New York Mets [112]
1995
*
IL 86–56 .606 1st 1st 4–5 .444 Won Western Division title
Won semifinals vs. Richmond Braves, 3–2
Lost IL championship vs. Ottawa Lynx, 3–1[113]
New York Mets [114]
1996
^
IL 82–59 .582 2nd 2nd 2+12 0–3 .000 Lost semifinals vs. Columbus Clippers, 3–0[115] New York Mets [116]
1997 IL 75–67 .528 5th 3rd 4 New York Mets [117]
1998 IL 70–72 .493 7th 2nd 9 New York Mets [118]
1999 IL 77–63 .550 4th 3rd 4+12 New York Mets [119]
2000 IL 65–79 .451 10th (tie) 3rd 16+12 New York Mets [120]
2001
*
IL 85–57 .599 2nd 1st 2–3 .400 Won Southern Division title
Lost semifinals vs. Louisville RiverBats, 3–2[121]
New York Mets [122]
2002 IL 70–73 .490 8th 3rd 9+12 New York Mets [123]
2003 IL 67–76 .469 10th 3rd 7+12 New York Mets [124]
2004 IL 72–72 .500 7th 3rd 8+12 New York Mets [125]
2005
*
IL 79–65 .549 3rd 1st 2–3 .400 Won Southern Division title
Lost semifinals vs. Toledo Mud Hens, 3–2[126]
New York Mets [127]
2006 IL 57–84 .404 13th 3rd 22 New York Mets [128]
2007 IL 69–74 .483 9th 3rd 11 Baltimore Orioles [129]
2008 IL 64–78 .451 11th 2nd 9 Baltimore Orioles [130]
2009 IL 71–71 .500 7th 3rd 11 Baltimore Orioles [131]
2010 IL 67–77 .465 10th (tie) 3rd (tie) 21+12 Baltimore Orioles [132]
2011 IL 56–87 .392 13th 4th 24+12 Baltimore Orioles [133]
2012 IL 74–70 .514 7th 2nd 9 Baltimore Orioles [134]
2013 IL 77–67 .535 4th (tie) 2nd 10 Baltimore Orioles [135]
2014 IL 65–79 .451 13th 3rd 10 Baltimore Orioles [136]
2015
*
IL 78–66 .542 4th 1st 2–3 .400 Won Southern Division title
Lost semifinals vs. Columbus Clippers, 3–2[137]
Baltimore Orioles [138]
2016 IL 62–82 .431 13th 4th 3+12 Baltimore Orioles [139]
2017 IL 66–76 .465 10th 3rd 20 Baltimore Orioles [140]
2018 IL 69–71 .493 8th 3rd 10+12 Baltimore Orioles [141]
2019 IL 69–79 .432 12th 4th 20 Baltimore Orioles [142]
2020 IL Season cancelled (COVID-19 pandemic)[55] Baltimore Orioles [143]
2021 AAAE 48–72 .400 19th 6th 29 4–6 .400 Won series vs. Charlotte Knights, 3–2
Lost series vs. Durham Bulls, 4–1
Placed 20th (tie) in the Triple-A Final Stretch[59]
Baltimore Orioles [57]
Totals 4,251–4,215 .502 76–77 .497

Radio and television[edit]

All Tides home and road games are broadcast on ESPN 94.1 WVSP-FM.[144] Live audio broadcasts are also available online through the station's website as well as on the team's website and the MiLB First Pitch app. Games can be viewed through the MiLB.TV subscription feature of the official website of Minor League Baseball, with audio provided by a radio simulcast.[145]

As of 2021, Pete Michaud is the play-by-play announcer. Several former Tides broadcasters have gone on to work in Major League Baseball or other major league sports, including: Ford C. Frick Award winner Marty Brennaman (1970–1973), Pete Van Wieren (1974–1975), Larry Matson (1976), Bob Rathbun (1980–1985, 1990), Charlie Slowes (1986, 1991–1992), Ken Levine (1989–1990), and Bob Socci (2006–2011).[144]

Roster[edit]

Players Coaches/Other

Pitchers

Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders


Manager

  • 35 Gary Kendall

Coaches

  • 54 Tim Gibbons (hitting)
  • 39 Malcolm Holland (development)
  • 16 Ramon Sambo
  • 21 Kennie Steenstra (pitching)


Injury icon 2.svg 7-day injured list
* On Baltimore Orioles 40-man roster
~ Development list
# Rehab assignment
∞ Reserve list
‡ Restricted list
§ Suspended list
± Taxi squad
† Temporarily inactive list
Roster updated October 14, 2021
Transactions
→ More rosters: MiLB • Triple-A East
Baltimore Orioles minor league players

Awards[edit]

The franchise has been awarded these honors by Minor League Baseball.[45]

Minor League Baseball Awards
Award Season Ref.
John H. Johnson President's Award 1993 [45]
Charles K. Murphy Patriot Award 2018 [45]

One player won a league award in recognition for their performance with Tidewater in the Carolina League.[17]

Carolina League Awards
Award Recipient Season Ref.
Most Valuable Player Ed Stroud 1964 [17]

Fourteen players, five managers, and two executives won league awards in recognition for their performance with Tidewater/Norfolk in the International League.[24]

International League Awards
Award Recipient Season Ref.
Most Valuable Player Mike Vail 1975 [24]
Most Valuable Player Randy Milligan 1987 [24]
Most Valuable Player Tom O'Malley 1989 [24]
Most Valuable Player Jeff Manto 1994 [24]
Most Valuable Player Butch Huskey 1995 [24]
Most Valuable Player Roberto Petagine 1997 [24]
Most Valuable Player Ryan Mountcastle 2019 [24]
Most Valuable Pitcher Craig Swan 1975 [24]
Most Valuable Pitcher Juan Berenguer 1978 [24]
Most Valuable Pitcher Walt Terrell 1983 [24]
Most Valuable Pitcher John Mitchell 1986 [24]
Most Valuable Pitcher Jason Isringhausen 1995 [24]
Most Valuable Pitcher Mike Fyhrie 1996 [24]
Rookie of the Year Mike Vail 1975 [24]
Rookie of the Year Mookie Wilson 1979 [24]
Rookie of the Year Randy Milligan 1987 [24]
Rookie of the Year Jason Isringhausen 1995 [24]
Manager of the Year Clyde McCullough 1969 [24]
Manager of the Year Hank Bauer 1972 [24]
Manager of the Year Joe Frazier 1975 [24]
Manager of the Year Toby Harrah 1995 [24]
Manager of the Year Ron Johnson 2015 [24]
Executive of the Year Dave Rosenfield 1975 [24]
Executive of the Year Dave Rosenfield 1982 [24]
Executive of the Year Dave Rosenfield 1987 [24]
Executive of the Year Dave Rosenfield 1993 [24]
Spirit of the International League Kenny Magner 2019 [24]

Managers[edit]

Johnny Antonelli managed the Tides from 1973 to 1974.
John Stearns managed the Tides in 2004.
Gary Allenson managed the Tides from 2007 to 2010 and in 2011.

Norfolk has had 32 managers since their inaugural 1961 season.

No. Manager Season(s)
1 Granny Hamner 1961
2 Chase Riddle 1962
3 Allen Jones 1963–1965
4 Bobby Morgan[n 1] 1966
5 Lou Kahn[n 1] 1966
6 Bob Wellman 1967–1968
7 Clyde McCullough 1969
8 Chuck Hiller 1970
9 Hank Bauer 1971–1972
10 Johnny Antonelli 1973–1974
11 Joe Frazier 1975
12 Tom Burgess 1976
13 Frank Verdi 1977–1980
14 Jack Aker 1981–1982
15 Davey Johnson 1983
16 Bob Schaefer 1984–1985
17 Sam Perlozzo 1986
18 Mike Cubbage 1987–1989
19 Steve Swisher 1990–1991
20 Clint Hurdle 1992–1993
21 Bobby Valentine 1994
22 Toby Harrah 1995
Bobby Valentine[n 2] 1996
23 Bruce Benedict[n 2] 1996
24 Rick Dempsey 1997–1998
25 John Gibbons 1999–2001
26 Bobby Floyd 2002–2003
27 John Stearns 2004
28 Ken Oberkfell 2005–2006
29 Gary Allenson[n 3] 2007–2010
30 Bobby Dickerson[n 3] 2010
Gary Allenson 2011
31 Ron Johnson 2012–2018
32 Gary Kendall 2019–present

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Bobby Morgan was fired on July 23, 1966, and Lou Kahn was appointed manager on July 24.[146]
  2. ^ a b Bobby Valentine was promoted to manager of the New York Mets on August 26, 1996, and third base coach Bruce Benedict was appointed manager of the Tides.[147]
  3. ^ a b Gary Allenson was promoted to third base coach of the Baltimore Orioles on June 4, 2010, and Bobby Dickerson, Baltimore's minor league and Latin America field coordinator, was appointed interim manager.[148]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Tides Mascots". Norfolk Tides. Minor League Baseball. Retrieved July 21, 2021.
  2. ^ a b "Front Office Staff". Norfolk Tides. Minor League Baseball. Retrieved July 21, 2021.
  3. ^ a b "Portsmouth, Virginia Encyclopedia". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved August 5, 2021.
  4. ^ a b c d e f "Norfolk, Virginia Encyclopedia". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved August 5, 2021.
  5. ^ "Fourth Place Norfolk Tars Pull Out of Shaky Piedmont League". The News Leader. Staunton. July 14, 1955. p. 14 – via Newspapers.com.
  6. ^ "Outlook Dim in Piedmont". The Progress-Index. Petersburg. December 9, 1955. p. 14 – via Newspapers.com.
  7. ^ "Lawrence Will Quit Baseball Operations". The Times Dispatch. Richmond. February 16, 1956. p. 21 – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ a b c "Frank Lawrence Stadium". Stats Crew. Retrieved August 5, 2021.
  9. ^ "High Rock Park". Stats Crew. Retrieved August 5, 2021.
  10. ^ Rolfe, Shelley (January 2, 1961). "Hamner Studying Sally Bus Schedules". The Times-Dispatch. Richmond. p. 17 – via Newspapers.com.
  11. ^ Karmosky, Charles (April 18, 1961). "3,158 See Tides Break Tie, Whip Charlotte, 7-4, in Class 'A' Bow". Daily Press. Newport News. p. 13 – via Newspapers.com.
  12. ^ "1962 South Atlantic League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  13. ^ "Orphaned Tides may See Bid to Class 'B' Carolina League". Daily Press. Newport News. November 9, 1962. p. 30 – via Newspapers.com.
  14. ^ Karmosky, Charles (January 14, 1963). "Seven-Year Wait Over, Pro Baseball Back on Peninsula". Daily Press. Newport News. p. 9 – via Newspapers.com.
  15. ^ "1963 Carolina League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  16. ^ "1964 Carolina League". Stats Crew. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  17. ^ a b c "Carolina League Award Winners". Carolina League. Minor League Baseball. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  18. ^ "1965 Carolina League". Stats Crew. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
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  20. ^ "1967 Carolina League". Stats Crew. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  21. ^ "1968 Carolina League". Stats Crew. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  22. ^ Kouvaris, Sam (December 19, 2020). "Sam Kouvaris: Triple-A Leap Brings New Opportunities for Jumbo Shrimp". The Florida Times-Union. Retrieved April 23, 2021.
  23. ^ a b "2021 Norfolk Tides Media Guide". Norfolk Tides. Minor League Baseball. 2021. p. 123. Retrieved August 5, 2021 – via Issuu.
  24. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am "International League Award Winners". International League. Minor League Baseball. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
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  26. ^ "Metropolitan Park". Stats Crew. Retrieved August 5, 2021.
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  28. ^ "1971 International League". Stats Crew. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  29. ^ "1972 International League". Stats Crew. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  30. ^ a b c d e f g "Triple-A Baseball Interleague Post-Season Play Results". Triple-A Baseball. Archived from the original on July 10, 2019. Retrieved August 3, 2021.
  31. ^ "1973 International League". Stats Crew. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  32. ^ "1975 International League". Stats Crew. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  33. ^ "1977 International League". Stats Crew. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  34. ^ "1979 International League". Stats Crew. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  35. ^ "1981 International League". Stats Crew. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  36. ^ "1982 International League". Stats Crew. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  37. ^ "1983 International League". Stats Crew. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  38. ^ "1985 International League". Stats Crew. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
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